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"Joe's Special" - Spinach, Beef and Egg Hash

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 31 August 2017 at 15:07
"Joe's Special" - Spinach, Beef and Egg Hash



I found this in Saveur's online magazine, and intend to try it:

Quote The debate rages on as to the origin of this San Francisco dish—"Joe's" restaurant has seen several incarnations. Original Joe's on Taylor Street, however, has had it on the menu for 59 years.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Spinach-Beef-and-Egg-Hash


This artcle was from 2002, so the dish is at least 74 years old at the time of this posting, and I would assume that it could be much older than that. In the comments section, one person wrote this note:

Quote I am 69 years old, grew up in Berkeley, California. I remember my dad making "Joe's Special" for us kids when we were 4-, 5- and 6-year-olds. So, it has been around longer than the 59 years mentioned in the article. I was told that Joe's Special was a dish invented by newly-rich miners from the gold fields in the 1850's.


I'm not sure if the dish goes back to the California Gold Rush, but it is certainly possible.


As usual, Saveur "cheffed it up" just a bit; here's their recipe:

Quote To serve 2:

1.5 pounds fresh spinach (to yield 3⁄4 lb.)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 yellow onion, peeled and chopped
1⁄2 pound ground chuck
3 eggs, beaten
Grated parmigiano-reggiano
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Trim spinach, wash in several changes of water, then blanch in a pot of boiling salted water over medium-high heat for 2 minutes. Drain in a colander and cool under cold running water. Squeeze out excess water; roughly chop.

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook for 10 minutes; add ground chuck and cook, breaking up with a spoon, until brown, about 3 minutes.

Add spinach, cook for 2 minutes; add eggs and cook, without stirring, for 30 seconds. Remove from heat, stir, and season to taste with grated parmigiano-reggiano, salt, and pepper.


I am guessing that the world would probably not end if a person:

1. Skipped the first step, blanching the spinach
2. Used butter, rather than olive oil
3. Used plain, ol' Kraft grated Parmesan cheese out of the can

I know that I intend to try this, probably with the variations I've enumerated above. I might also use corned beef, rather than ground beef - simply because my son and I like to cook corned beef hash for breakfast, now and then.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 September 2017 at 02:45
Sounds good Ron....just trying to wrap my head around the idea of "hash" without any potatoes. Actually kind of a spinach omelette that got scrambled...interesting.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 September 2017 at 05:57
Just guessing, Ron, but I'd say the blanching is to maintain the vibrant green color.

Dave, I'm with you. Can it really be hash with no spuds?
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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