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Karides Güveç

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 08 November 2017 at 14:18
Karides Güveç
Shrimp Stew

This recipe comes from Burcu at the Almost Turkish Recipes Blog, and looks incredible. Several of the comments noted that this recipe brings back very fond memories of visiting or living in Turkey, and it seems to be a huge favourite among many; Burcu herself refers to it as a "family favourite."


Photo Credit: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_2_XiQzKi0Wo/R9GyTcXQG9I/AAAAAAAABPY/VbhnpleL9Ik/s400/DSCN3078.JPG

Quote Karides Güveç

To serve 6:

1 or 2 pounds raw, peeled shrimp (use 2 pounds if you are having company)
1 onion, finely chopped
4 to 5 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
3 tbsp olive oil
2 green peppers, chopped
2 red peppers, chopped
Sliced white mushroom (use as much as you want)
3 to 4 tomatoes, diced (if you will use canned diced tomato, put it in a blender)
4 bay leaves
1/2 bunch parsley, finely chopped
Salt and pepper
1 to 2 cups of grated mozzarella cheese (the best cheese to use is Kashkaval, if you can find it)

Optional: crushed red pepper flakes


Heat oil in a broad pot. Cook onion and garlic until soft. Add peppers and stir for 2 minutes. Add mushroom and cook until almost soft. Stir in tomato [and add bay leaves]. If the tomatoes you are using are not very juicy, add some water to barely cover the vegetables and mushroom. [Salt and pepper to taste]

Cover and cook for 5 to 8 minutes, until tomato is cooked. Stir in shrimps. Cover and cook for 5 to 6 minutes...No more! Add the parsley.

Divide the Güveç into individual oven safe soup bowls or souffle dishes; or put the whole stew in a big casserole. Bake at 350F for 15 to 20 minutes.

After 20 minutes, cover the stew with grated mozzarella and bake until golden brown.

Serve with white rice.

http://almostturkish.blogspot.co.uk/2008/03/shrimp-stew-karides-gve.html



Photo Credit: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_2_XiQzKi0Wo/R9Gyx8XQG-I/AAAAAAAABPg/JLVqgSKUg_s/s400/DSCN3075.JPG

The recipe doesn't mention the usage of the bay leaves or the salt and pepper, so I added my suggestions in [brackets] above.

Needless to say, this recipe has been added to my efer-growing list of dishes to try....
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 November 2017 at 12:17
We tried this last night, and it was very good, indeed! My #2 son, Mike made it, and followed the recipe pretty closely; the only real difference was that we used a mix of red, yellow and orange peppers, rather than any green.

I enjoyed it very much - a little bit of crushed Aleppo pepper really made it nice, in my opinion.

This is a good one!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 November 2017 at 15:31
Sounds pretty good, Ron.

I'm surprised at the quantity of cheese, though. I would have thought it would overpower the delicacy of the shrimp.

And even without the word "guvec" in the title, you know it's Turkish, because of their penchant for tossing a tomato or six into every dish.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 November 2017 at 15:38
The cheese didn't seem to interfere at all, in my opinion. The step after adding the shrimp seemed a little silly to him, but what he did was to pour it all into a rectangular earthenware casserole, then proceeded from there. The cheese made a thin, toasty layer that way; however, with individual serving dishes, there might have been a greater perceived presence of the cheese.

The Guvec was a tad thin to my preference, but that is probably because the shrimp were frozen, raw shrimp, and carried quite a bit of moisture to the pot. I am guessing that, properly thawed and drained, it might have been thicker, and just right...either that, or that how it is supposed to be. In any case, it was wonderful, from a flavor standpoint.
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