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Kasha With Mushroom/Onion Sauce

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 16 May 2012 at 08:54
Kasha is a staple grain of central- and eastern-Europe. What is it? Kasha is simply the roasted groats (think seeds) of buckwheat.
 
The basic cooking method seems to be consistent. Mix one cup of kasha with an egg. Dry roast that mixture in a saucepan until the egg is fully cooked and absorbed. Add 1 1/2 cups water, bring to boil, reduce to simmer, cover, and cook until groats are tender, about 15 minutes.
 
It's what you do with the kasha that makes one dish different from another, one housewives special touch different than the one next door. All sorts of veggies are combined with the kasha. Onions and mushrooms are common ingredients, as are bowtie noodles. I've had versons that mixed the groats with cauliflower, however, and even zucchini.
 
This is my own take on a classic combination:
 
Kasha With Mushroom/Onion Sauce
 
1 cup cooked kasha
1/2 cup cooked bowtie pasta
3 tbls sesame oil
2 cups mushrooms, thinkly sliced
1 1/2 cups chicken stock
1 1/2 tbls arrowroot
2 tls tamari or other soy sauce
 
Combine the kasha and bowties. Set aside.
 
Saute mushrooms in the oil until golden brown. Add onions and continue cooking until they caramelize slightly. Add stock to pan.
 
Make a paste with the tqamari and arrowroot. Add to pan, stirring until thick. Add the kasha/bowtie mixture. Stir to combine well and heat through.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2012 at 10:52
Sound good it reminds me of my granny's  food . at home we call it kasha varnishkas .
Thanks for reminding me of her
Ahron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2012 at 11:58
My Mom's kasha varnishkas never had mushrooms, Ahron. Just the onions, bowties, and kasha.
 
She'd serve it with her pot roast---which, by itself, was to die for---and we'd use the jus from the roast as sauce for the kasha.
 
I've tried replicating her pot roast many times. I've come close. But never the true gelt. Unhappy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2012 at 12:03
interesting - i recently purchased some kasha, and was considering it as part of a traditional filling for holubky - perhaps mixed with chopped and sauted onions and mushrooms, with or (if i want to go more "peasant" with my preparation) without meat.
 
your information on kasha gives me some direction ~ thanks, brook!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2012 at 12:48
your information on kasha gives me some direction
 
Uh, huh! And just who was it saying what about who's interest in central European foods. Wink
 
Just guessing here, Ron, but I think raw kasha would work if you cooked them on the stovetop, but there might not be enough time-in-liquid with the oven cooking.
 
My mom always made stuffed cabbage on the stovetop, and used raw rice as the filler (not instant or minute rice). But they cooked for hours, and the rice had plenty of time to get cooked through.
 
Best bet, as usual, would be to try it both ways and see what happens.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2012 at 13:46
my granny's kasha didn't have mushrooms either ,onion few Pisces of brisket or any cheap piece of meat  and a lot of bones with maduvae(Marrow bones).
Ahron
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