Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Other Food-Related Topics > Around the Kitchen Table
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Learning a region and its foodways
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Learning a region and its foodways

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8206
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Learning a region and its foodways
    Posted: 29 November 2017 at 10:31
A while ago, Tomáš (Furtwangler) shared some insights with me on the attempt to revive Slovakia's "traditional" foodways after so many years of enforced conformity. I found these concepts to be interesting, and many of those ideas also carry over when attempting to learn or re-create foods from any region:

Originally posted by Tomáš Tomáš wrote:

In Slovakia, there are two big challenges when rediscovering our own cuisine. Most obviously, we had 40 years of communism, during which time the cooking had deteriorated drastically. But beyond that, there is also a problem with Slovak cookbooks.

Firstly, we don't have great food writers like Elizabeth David, Curnonsky, Patience Grey or Diane Kochilas. We have, I think, lost the connection with good peasant cuisine or good classic bourgeois cooking and we're only rediscovering it now.

What this means is that when I see a recipe in a contemporary cookbook listing cooking oil among ingredients, I use lard instead. Or when I see vinegar, I know they mean that distilled white vinegar, which to my mind doesn't have many good culinary uses. So I tend to use wine vinegar or cider vinegar or something like that. Something that simply makes sense in the terroir. For example, if the recipe comes from the vicinity of, say, Trnava, which is a wine-growing region, wine vinegar or verjuice is a safe bet.

So, in many respects, I am trying to rediscover the cuisine. I am lucky in that I can still buy the traditional specialties such as plum jam, top-quality raw honey, raw cow's milk to make fresh tvaroh, unpasteurized 100%-sheep's milk bryndza in season, uncultured žinčica, good Slovak smoked bacon, and - if I am lucky - homemade jaternice or krvavničky from someone. But as far as recipes and general food culture go, it is quite a challenge and a learning experience. For instance, while zabíjačky still take place in the countryside, with all of the related culinary festivities, I live in a city and there is not a single restaurant cooking good traditional food.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5738
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2017 at 15:46


The whole región of far Eastern  Europe,  Bulgaria,  Romania, Lithuania,  Slovakia, Estonia, Armenia and further east,  non E.U. countries,  The  Ukraine and others, have experienced same former Ussr  devastation and are all finally re-discovering their products and inviting chefs from  France to coach chefs and have been  opening culinary academies too ..  

Very fascinating Project surely ..  

Keep us posted ..   

www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4239
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 December 2017 at 07:52
Interesting how this pattern appears over and over again. After the demise of Franco, Spain went through a similar rebirth of interest in it's traditional foods, many of which had been suppressed

What would be really interesting is to see if the eastern European countries simultaneously develop avent guarde cusines side by side with re-emerging traditional ones, as happened in Spain.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8206
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 December 2017 at 08:18
Originally posted by Brook Brook wrote:

What would be really interesting is to see if the eastern European countries simultaneously develop avent guarde cusines side by side with re-emerging traditional ones


Based on what I have seen from some Polish, Czech, Romanian and even Balkan chefs, I would say that this is quite probable. A few of them are turning out very creative and innovative things based on their humble ancestral foods.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.031 seconds.