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Lemon cucumbers

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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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    Posted: 19 January 2012 at 18:06
I just ordered some lemon cucumber seeds. Has anyone here grown them?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 January 2012 at 03:14
First I've heard of them Melissa....are they an Asian variety?

Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 January 2012 at 03:37
Strange looking little devils for sure....supposed to be very good for pickling from what little I've read.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 January 2012 at 14:49
http://www.ehow.com/how_4693552_grow-lemon-cucumbers.html

Apparently they're just old-fashioned, and called that for their looks, not their taste. I've never grown them before. The seeds came today, but it'll be months before I can plant them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote s.shooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2012 at 14:04
Yes! they are wonderful! Pick them on the small side the quality will be much better. The seeds get huge in a hurry.
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2012 at 15:33
I love the thought of "snack sized" cucumbers.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marissa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 13:37
I've planted them 4 years in a row and only got a crop of them last year!  I think we just must not have the right conditions for that variety.  The ones that did grow were great though.  And s.shooter has it right - the "blow up" fast.  Pick them small!
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 15:54
What zone are you in?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 15:56
We grew them one year. Found the window between "wow, these are great," and "omigosh, these are nothing but seed" to be rather small, and didn't bother with them again.
 
Going to seed like that seems to be a function of small cukes. The Little Whites do the same thing, for instance.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marissa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 16:08
Originally posted by Melissa Mead Melissa Mead wrote:

What zone are you in?

Zone 8...should go edit my profile for a more specific location!
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 16:31
I'm in 5b. I hope that's not too cold!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 18:55
Guys, despite all the attention paid to them, for vegetable growers knowing your zone is the next best thing to useless information---even if you have the recently updated ones; which use more realistic information.
 
All the USDA Agriculural Hardiness Zones (to use their formal moniker) tell you is whether a particular plant will winter over, unprotected, where you live. But most vegetables are grown as annuals, even if they aren't. So knowing how hardy they are won't help.
 
What's important is knowing the average last and first frost dates. They determine the length of your growing season, and, thus, what you can grow and when to plant it.
 
Here's an example using tomatoes, because they are the number one most popular veggie in home gardens. You start tomatoes six to eight weeks before last frost. Doesn't matter what zone you are in, it's always six to eight weeks before last frost.
 
So, you count back six to eight weeks from last frost and set your seed indoors. Tomatoes are classed as tender garden plants, which means frost will kill them. So the days between the two frost dates determine the growing season for tomatoes. Armed with that info you decide on varieties.
 
It should be obvious that if you only have 70 growing days between frosts that you not choose long-season varieties, cuz they need 80 plus days to mature. Conversely, if you have 120 growing days, pretty much any tomato will grow where you are (although there are other factors affecting choice as well).
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