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Looking for a coddle recipe

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dla69 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 08 January 2011 at 18:35
Does anyone have a recipe for a Dublin coddle?  I had this hearty, simple stew when I visited the city in 2009.

I've been looking at some of the recipes online and before I tried one of them, I figured I'd ask here.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 January 2011 at 05:32
That's a new one on me Dave...never even seen it, much less make it. Looks like you may be on your own experimenting with the coddle.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 January 2011 at 07:33
That's a new one here, too.  Guess you need to try a recipe and educate the rest of us.  Look foward to learning more about coddle. Big smile  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 January 2011 at 08:32
I'd never heard of it, so I looked it up. Judging from this:http://homecooking.about.com/od/porkrecipes/r/blpork20.htm, it sounds delicious!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dla69 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 January 2011 at 10:16
Thanks, everyone. 

Looks like I've got a little experimenting to do.  Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 January 2011 at 18:27
from wiki:
 
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Coddle (sometimes Dublin Coddle) is an Irish dish consisting of layers of roughly sliced pork sausages and rashers (thinly sliced, somewhat fatty back bacon) with sliced potatoes, and onions. Traditionally, it can also include barley.

Coddle is traditionally associated with Dublin, Ireland.[1] It was reputedly a favourite dish of Seán O'Casey and Jonathan Swift,[2] and it appears in several Dublin literary references including the works of James Joyce.[3]

The dish is semi-boiled, and semi-steamed in the stock produced by boiling the rashers and sausages. Some traditional recipes favour the addition of a small amount of Guinness to the pot, but this is very rare in modern versions of the recipe.[2] The dish should be cooked in a pot with a well-fitting lid in order to steam the ingredients left uncovered by water.[1] The only seasoning is usually salt, pepper, and occasionally parsley. It could be considered a comfort food in Ireland, and is inexpensive, easy to prepare and quick to cook. It is often eaten in the winter months. In the days when Catholics were not supposed to eat meat on Fridays, this was a meal often eaten on Thursdays as it allowed a family to use up any remaining sausages or rashers.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 January 2011 at 18:32
Dublin Coddle

This is a very popular dish, especially in Dublin, and has been so for many years. It is nourishing, tasty, economical and warming - what more could you ask? Although it is best made with a good stock - water in which a ham has been boiled, or even a ham bone - a light stock cube will substitute.

1lb/ 500g best sausages
8oz/ 250g streaky bacon
1/2pt/ 300ml/ 1 cup stock or water
6 medium potatoes
2 medium onions
salt and pepper

(serves four)

Cut the bacon into 1in/ 3cm squares. Bring the stock to the boil in a medium saucepan which has a well-fitting lid, add the sausages and the bacon and simmer for about 5 minutes. Remove the sausages and bacon and save the liquid. Cut each sausage into four or five pieces. Peel the potatoes and cut into thick slices. Skin the onions and slice them. Assemble a layer of potatoes in the saucepan, followed by a layer of onions and then half the sausages and bacon. Repeat the process once more and then finish off with a layer of potatoes. Pour the reserved stock over and season lightly to taste. Cover and simmer gently for about an hour. Adjust the seasoning and serve piping hot.

From the Appletree Press title: A Little Irish Cookbook.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dla69 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 January 2011 at 18:26
My wife is going to try making this later this week. 

I think it will be a variant of this one.  http://www.europeancuisines.com/Irish-Dublin-Coddle
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 January 2011 at 03:01
Looking forward to a post on that Dave...sounds very interesting.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 January 2011 at 16:39

indeed - let's see how it comes out ~

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 January 2011 at 22:31
Interesting, looking forward to hearing how it turns out.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dla69 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 January 2011 at 17:40
My wife made it for dinner tonight. 

She used loose sausage instead of the cased that I had in Dublin.  She made it on the stove top and made sure to not boil the dish.  The dish had a wonderfully rich broth.  It was simple, hardy and tasty.

The next time that we make it, I'll take some pictures. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2016 at 11:26
The histories I've read about this dish disagree to some extent. There really isn't any one preferred recipe for this as it may have been originally intended as a way to use up leftover meat(s) on a Thursday before the coming no meat Friday.  One thing the various histories seem to agree upon is it was a slow cooked one pot meal that could hold up after many hours of cooking.

Corned beef and cabbage is an American thing so yesterday, St Paddy's Day,  I made A Dublin Coddle served with Irish Soda Bread although any good bread will do.

The recipe I doctored up a bit is simple and delicious:

Dublin Coddle with Irish Soda Bread

Cut 1 pound thick sliced bacon into 1" pieces and fry in a Dutch Oven until crispy

Remove bacon and fry 4 or 5 high quality pork sausages in the bacon fat until well browned.

Remove sausages and slice into thirds

Pour out bacon and sausage fat leaving 1 or 2 tablespoons

Begin layering with thick sliced onion (full rings)

Then bacon

Then sausage

Then large pieces of carrot

2" chunks of rutabaga

Large chunks of potato

Scatter chopped fresh parsley between each layer, about 1/4 C total
Add 2 C ham broth (I used chicken) and bring to a boil on stove top.

When broth begins to boil, cover and place in a 300ºF oven for 90 to 120 minutes.  It will go longer if you plan on being at the local pub for longer than 2 hrs.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2016 at 18:59
Absolutely beautiful gMan - I really like what you've done, there!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 April 2016 at 23:05
That looks wonderful. Good enough to re-evaluate my opinion of coddling sausages.
As a child I lived in fear of coddled sausages. My Gran made them. They did NOT look like that. Grey, watery sausage and potato lumps, the carrots were the highlight. No onion because it 'repeated'. It was an awful awful awful dinner and the green parsley somehow made it all look more billious.
She was a good cook and better baker - and her coddled eggs - I think I will share with you all.
But those sausages belong in the 1960's kitchen never to see the light of day ever again.
This version looks delicious.
Thanks gMan.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 March 2018 at 09:29
I'm bumping this should anybody wish to try an "authentic" Irish recipe for St Paddy's day rather than the standard American corned beef with cabbage. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 March 2018 at 09:57
That REALLY gooks good - The Beautiful Mrs. Tas loves her Corned Beef and Cabbage, but I would like to try this ... maybe on a weekend.

Thanks for bumping it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 March 2018 at 10:39
Nothing wrong with corned beef and cabbage.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 March 2018 at 17:41
I'm planning to make colcannon.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2018 at 07:40
Melissa, colcannon (along with raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens) is one of my favorite things (apologies to Julie Andrews).  I prefer cabbage to kale but they are both fantastic. Add ham (a substitute for Irish "bacon") for a complete meal.  If you have Kerrygold Irish butter available, the deep yellow makes a great looking presentation used in the butter "well" in the center.
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