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Lusse Brod

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 30 January 2013 at 12:02

Many years ago, using a recipe I’d clipped from Gourmet Magazine, I attempted making what they called Swedish Saffron Buns. They were an abysmal failure. Was it the recipe? My inexperience at the time? Who’s to say?

Suffice it to say I came across the recipe card in my file, and had decided to give it another try. Lo and behold, it turns out there is a similar recipe in Bread: Breads of the World and How To Bake Them At Home.

So far I’ve been impressed with every recipe I’ve tried from that book, so decided to go with that version. They came out perfectly.

Lusse Brod translates as “Lucy’s Bread.” Traditionally, these buns are made on Santka Lucia Day, December 13. Many people believe they are a Christmas celebration bread, but they’re actually made to celebrate the earlier Saint’s Day.

Ron has provided some great insights into St. Lucy at http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/potatis-korv-fr-sankta-lucia-och-julafton_topic2970.html, so there’s no need to repeat it.

Although these buns are made in various shapes, the most common is the double-twist, similar to that used on Pane Siciliano, http://www.foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/pane-siciliano_topic208.html 

 In both cases, this ornate shape is said to represent the Saint’s eyes. Although it looks complex it’s really quite simple. Roll the dough into a rope, tapered at both ends, about 11 inches long. Then spiral it inwards, equally from both ends. Do it once and you’ll have it down pat.  

The buns will look smallish, even after the second rising. Don’t worry about it. There’s a lot of oven spring, and they come out just like any dinner roll in size.

LUSSE BROD

 

½ cup milk

Pinch of saffron threads, crushed

3 ½ cups all-purpose or bread flour

½ cup ground almonds

½ tsp salt

6 tbls sugar

2 tsp (one envelope) active dry yeast

½ cup lukewarm water

Few drops almond extract

¼ cup butter, softened

1 egg

1 tbls water

 

Line two sheet pans with parchment paper and sprinkle lightly with cornmeal or semolina.

 

Preheat oven to 400F.

 

Heat milk almost to the boil. Add the saffron, remove from heat, and let infuse about 15 minutes. Meanwhile combine the flour, almonds, salt and sugar in a large bowl.

 

In a small bowl, mix the yeast with the water. Add the saffron liquid, yeast mixture, and almond extract to the flour mixture and mix into a dough. Gradually beat in the softened butter.

 

Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead for five minutes, until smooth and elastic. Place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover, and let rise in a draft-free location until doubled in bulk, about an hour.

 

Punch down the dough. Divide into 12 equally sized pieces. Shape each piece into a double-twist as outlined above. Transfer each shaped bun to a sheet pan. Cover with lightly oiled plastic film and set in a draft-free location for 30 minutes. Buns will rise, but not necessarily double in size.

 

Beat the egg and water to form a glaze. Brush each bun with the egg glaze.

Bake until golden, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack. Let cool slightly, to serve warm, or let cool completely to serve cold.

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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MarkR View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MarkR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 January 2013 at 12:27
That sounds excellent!
As far as the failure, I have had both great success and complete failure with the same roll recipe. I chalk the failure up to the guy in the mirror!
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 January 2013 at 14:10
That was my reaction, Mark. Especially back then, when I had no idea what I was doing, breadwise.
 
As is usually the case, when making a bread for the first time, I followed the recipe exactly. And there were no significant problems. I did add about a tablespoon more water, as the dough was kneaded, and that was it.
 
The difference between then and now is that today I recognize when a dough is too wet/dry and can fix it. Back then? Not a chance.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 February 2013 at 08:11
Sounds pretty good, Brook, a great tradition to add to the Sankta Lucia celebration!
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