Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Food Groups > Fats, Oils, Sauces, Sweets and Condiments
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Making It With Mustard
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Making It With Mustard

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
Author
Message
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4396
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2013 at 19:16
Shouldn't matter that much, Ron. The brown seed is slightly hotter, but there's not that much of it.

The Plochman's contains grated horseradish. You could try that in lieu of the brown seed. Maybe a tablespoonful in the entire recipe?

If you buy a commercial grated horseradish (which is in vinegar), you can start mixing it in after the fact. Start with a teaspoonful, mix well, and taste. Slowly add more if necessary.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4396
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 May 2013 at 07:43
Ron, this should really appeal to you:

I did some research, and it turns out many Serbian recipes, oddly enough, specify "Finnish" mustard. I wasn't aware that there was such a thing, so researched it.

Turns out Finnish mustard is sweet & hot. Recipes I found, while they vary in other ingredients, always start with equal amounts of hot mustard powder and sugar.

Hot mustard powder isn't common in the U.S., so many of the adapted recipes I saw included a hint of cayenne.

If you do a search under Finnish Mustard you'll find a recipe that appeals, I'm sure. To take it more in a Balkan direction, substitute yogurt where the recipe calls for heavy cream.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8582
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2013 at 08:27
Good information there, Brook - and a bit unexpected. I knew that the Scandinavian mustards tend to be sweet/hot, but did not know that the preference reached down into the Balkans. Then again, there was quite a bit of raiding and trading going on along that route, so perhaps some habits remained behind.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4396
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2013 at 09:07
Not just raiding, Ron. There were all sorts of shifting alliances and strange bedfellows. 400 or so years ago, the Swedish king was fighting on the side of the Poles, for instance, in one of those interminable wars that swept that part of the world.

I don't doubt that culinary influences traveled with the armies.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4396
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 August 2014 at 06:23
When researching my Ukrainian themed meal I discovered that Ukrainians are crazy about mustard; all sorts of mustard. Mustard on meats. Mustard on fish. Mustard on vegetables. Mustard mixed into salad dressings. Mustard on soft pretzels. All sorts of mustards.

Considering my recently acquired fascination with making my own mustards, well, ya gotta love it when a plan comes together, even if there hadn’t been a plan.

Basic Ukrainian mustard is similar to most whole grain yellow mustards. Here’s the recipe:

¼ cup yellow mustard seeds
1 ½ tbls mustard powder
1 tsp salt
1 tsp granulated sugar
3 tbls white vinegar
2 tbls sunflower oil

Coarsely grind the mustard seeds using a mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder. Put the ground seeds in a small bowl, add just enough cold water to moisten (about 2 tablespoons) and leave sit for 10 minutes.

Add the remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly. Spoon the mustard into a small jar or mustard pot, cover tightly, set in a cool place, and let the flavors develop for two weeks before opening.

This basic mustard is modified in various ways by removing a good dollop of it from the jar and mixing in a drizzle of various herbs and other flavorings. Among the possibilities, according to Annette Ogrodnik Corona, in her book, The New Ukrainian Cookbook, are:

Dill Mustard: pairs well with fish dishes, smoked fish, and potatoes.
Mint Mustard: pairs well with lamb dishes, beef, pork meatballs, and potatoes.
Cherry Mustard: pairs well with all smoked meats, game meats, pork, duck, and goose.
Ginger Mustard: pairs well with herring dishes and pork dishes.
Cognac Mustard: pairs well with pork, beef, game meats, salmon, and strongly flavored vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, or kohlrabi.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8582
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 January 2018 at 15:12
FarmSteady's Beer Mustard

One of my goals for this coming weekend is to make Soft Pretzels and Beer Cheese, using the kit that I purchased from FarmSteady:

http://farmsteady.com/instructions-how-to-make-soft-pretzels/

In their instructions, they also include a recipe for beer mustard, so I'll be making that, as well.

I am adding this recipe to the collective knowledge here, in case anyone wants to try it:

Quote How to Make Beer Mustard

Equipment

Food Processor or Blender
Sauce Pan
Non-Reactive Bowl

Ingredients

1.5 oz of mustard seeds
2 Tablespoons (30 ml) vinegar (Apple cider vinegar is best)
1/4 Cup (60 ml) Beer (Dark and malty German, Belgian, or English beer is best)
Spice Pack*

In non-reactive bowl, add mustard seeds.

Add vinegar and 2 tablespoons (30 ml) beer to mustard seeds. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 8-12 hours while mustard seeds acidify.

Note: Mustard seeds only start to taste hot, spicy, and mustard-like after soaking in something acidic. Otherwise, they taste more like seeds than mustard.

After your mustard has sat in the fridge for 8-12 hours, combine spice pack and 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of beer in a small sauce pan.

On medium heat, bring to a boil while stirring, then remove from heat. Let cool for 10 minutes.

In a food processor or blender, combine the mustard seeds (with its liquid) from the fridge with the spice and beer mixture from the sauce pan.

Blend until desired smoothness is reached. A great mustard can be super smooth or quite chunky. Make it how you like it.

Transfer to a sealed container and refrigerate for at least 8 hours before eating. This allows for the flavor and consistency to meld.

Enjoy with pretzels and beer. If you don't eat it all right away, your beer mustard will keep in the fridge for a month.

http://farmsteady.com/instructions-how-to-make-beer-mustard/


*My kit didn't come with this, so I have written to the company so that they can send one to me. It will arrive too late to use it this time, but that's okay; more incentive to make it again! In the meantime, a quick internet search reveals that common spices used in various beer mustard recipes include salt, brown sugar, allspice, onion and garlic. With this in mind, I'll improvise something for my first attempt.

Note that this recipe uses a food processor. I might prepare it in a mortar and pestle instead, for a coarser mustard.

More as it happens, etc. &c....

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.