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Making Mayonnaise

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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 11:53
Peanut oil! lol. Cool
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 11:57
if it does the trick, it works for me ~ lol ~
 
the other thing i will do is bite the bullet and do it in the blender. i've tried a stand mixer, a wand blender, hand-held beaters and whisking by hand. there have been various problems with each of these, but i have learned a few things.
 
i will say this - each time, using the original recipe in my first psot - it's always tasted GREAT! it just hasn't been right in texture etc. ~ if i can figure it out and get it right, this will be some wonderful stuff!
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 15:20
You could try avocado oil. It emulsifies beautifully in salad dressing. Tastes good too.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 16:51
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:


as for the oil, i like the idea of using all olive oil
Actually, you only think you do.  Heavy or flavorful oils will result in a much different product than what you think of as mayonnaise from the jar -- a product that many people find overpowering and offensive.  A very light, flavorless oil like canola will result in something more familiar -- and wastes less money if your technique is insufficient to produce success.

I'd recommend that you start with cheap, light and flavorless oil, and only experiment with blending in more flavorful oils once your technique is solid.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 16:55
hey, daikon - that sounds like good advice, especially since i am having so much trouble getting the technique down.
 
i originally considered canola oil, wasn't sure how it would work. it always seems to have an "off" smell to me but perhaps the other ingredients would over-ride that.
 
i  will give it a shot using straight olive oil first, then see if a blend or lighter olive oil might be in the works after that.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 17:03
If you don't like canola, then just use some other cheap, light, fairly flavorless "vegetable oil" blend.  Mayonnaise is mostly about texture, and you should work on getting that right before you move on to experiment with different flavors.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 15:14
Alright, people, i haven't yet had the chance to make another attempt at this, but with spring approaching, i can see all sorts of opportunities. with that in mind, plus the fact that so many people seem to be able to make this with no problems, i wanted to post a few pix here and see if we can find out where i am going wrong.
 
in all cases, i've been usng the recipe from Fime/Life's Foods of the world - The Cooking of Provincial France, 1968:

Quote Sauce Mayonnaise

To make about 2 cups:

3 egg yolks, at room temperature

1 to 3 teaspoons lemon juice or wine vinegar

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon white pepper

1 and 1/2 cups olive oil or vegetable or a combination of both

2 Tablespoons boiling water (optional)

 

Warm a large mixing bowl in hot water. Dry it quickly but thoroughly, and drop the egg yolks into it. With a wire whisk, rotary or electric beater, beat the yolks vigorously for about 2 minutes or until they thicken and cling to the whisk or beater. Add a teaspoon of the lemon juice or vinegar and the dry mustard, salt and pepper. Then beat in the oil, 1/2 teaspoon at a time; make sure each addition is absorbed before adding more. By the time 1/2 cup of the oil has been beaten in, the sauce should be like thick cream. Add the rest of the oil by teaspoonfuls, beating constantly. Taste and season with lemon juice, salt and pepper if necessary. To make the mayonnaise creamier and lessen the danger of separating, beat in the boiling water, 1 tablespoon at a time. Keep the mayonnaise in the refrigerator, tightly covered, until ready to use. For mayonnaise aux fines herbes, add two tablespoons finely chopped parsley and 1 tablespoon each of finely cut fresh chives and fresh tarragon.

 
this recipe seems to be similar and in proportion to other recipes i have seen, so i don't think that the problem is with the recipe; if someone who has enjoyed success with mayonnaise before would like to try this recipe and offer thoughts, i would be grateful. please note that the step at the end with the boiling water is an optional step, or a stop-gap against separation. i tried it once, but it didn't seem to work, so i haven't tried it since.
 
also, please note - for this attempt, i am using a wire whisk, but i have also used a wand blender and a stand mixer, with pretty much the same negative results, so i am guessing that the problem lies somewhere else.
 
also, no one is allowed to laugh at my equipment! LOL yes, i know it is rather pitiful ~ lol
 
anyway, here we go ~
 
here are the goods:
 
 
here are the salt, pepper and ground mustard, ready to go:
 
 
somehow, the salt got a little lemon juice on it, but that's ok.
 
we heated and dried the heavy mixing bowl as per the recipe; next, we commenced with separating the egg yolks from the whites, using this handy little tool:
 
 
and now my big secret is out: the beautiful mrs. tas eats her cereal from a hello kitty bowl.
 
when separating the eggs, i noticed there was a little bit of goop sticking to the yolks:
 
 
but i can't imagine that this is too much of a problem.
 
previously, i had tried using a stand mixer and also a wand blender, but with both of those attempts, it seemed that the blades/beeters couldn't "reach" the yolks to get started well, so for this attempt, i tried this:
 
 
my "real" wire whisk was MIA, so i used this, which came from an old set of hand-held electric beeters; it was a little worse for wear, as you will see in other pictures, but works fine with other similar whisking projects, so i don't think this was a problem, either.
 
we gave it some very vigorous whisking, and seemed to be doing well, so we added the lemon juice, salt, pepper and mustard and continued to whisk:
 
 
maybe this time, we would succeed?
 
once the seasonings were well-blended into the yolks, i began adding oil, very slowly, according to the instructions, while #3 son billy whisked:
 
 
we traded off the whisking task periodically, so as to keep a good  rhythm with as little algging as possible.
 
from the picture above, it seemed that we got off to a pretty good start, but there came a point, when there was still probably half the oil left to add, that it started getting a little precarious:
 
 
however, we kept at it, and the problem seemed to take care of itself; here, as we added a few more drops of oil, it looked like this whole project might work this time:
 
 
but by the time we got to this point:
 
 
it was clear that we were going to end up with the same, soupy, runny mess that we had experienced before.
 
it had good colour, tasted very good and even stayed together for a while, but it wasn't long before the components separated, and we were pretty much at the same pont as we had been with the other two attempts.
 
for future attempts, i've resolved to use larger eggs, making sure they are as fresh as can be; i've also committed to using a different oil, rather than strict olive oil, as i had used before. i don't know if either of these two changes will make any difference. 
 
any other ideas?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 16:50
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

Alright, people, i haven't yet had the chance to make another attempt at this, but with spring approaching, i can see all sorts of opportunities. with that in mind, plus the fact that so many people seem to be able to make this with no problems, i wanted to post a few pix here and see if we can find out where i am going wrong.
 
in all cases, i've been usng the recipe from Fime/Life's Foods of the world
You F'd it up already!


Seriously though, you should probably simplify until you're sure of the basic technique: 1 large egg yolk into a clean, medium-size mixing bowl; whisk that yolk until it turns light yellow (and a poor quality whisk does make your life considerably more difficult throughout the process...); thoroughly whisk in a couple of drops of acid (either vinegar or lemon juice); whisk like mad while adding just one drop of oil; keep whisking way beyond the point where you think it could possibly be doing any good;  repeat the last two steps;  repeat them again;  repeat them again; arm hasn't fallen off yet?  Good.  Repeat again; seriously, you can keep going this way for as long as you like until you have eventually added a full cup of oil to that one egg yolk -- you can't screw things up by going too slow; you can screw things up by going too fast.  Once you've got 1/2 a cup of oil whisked into a stable emulsion, you can pretty safely start to go faster, but not too fast!  

What's too fast?  That is where experience comes into play.  Do this once a day, every day for a week, and you'll have it figured out just how fast you can go.  It will have cost you 7 eggs, 7 cups of oil, and a little bit of vinegar.  A pretty cheap lesson!  And your whisking technique has greatly improved.  And you've got an arm like Popeye.  And you've made a least some edible mayonnaise.

Once you've successfully completed your apprenticeship, you can start improving flavor with salt, pepper, dry mustard, different oils, different vinegars, herbs, using mixing machines, etc.  But there is no point in wasting money on the extras until you have got the basic technique mastered with just an egg yolk, a little vinegar, and a cup of cheap oil.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 17:44
Dry mustard? Why? Try using prepared mustard instead, which adds a bit of acid. And fresh lemon juice.
 
I'm just guessing but, in like with Daikon's comments, I believe you added the oil too quickly, for one thing, and haven't whisked the mixture enough, for another. Do not discount that last; even with a power tool it takes much longer than you think for the emulsification to take place. Whisking by hand can take two days longer than forever.
 
One thing that's definately not causing the problem is contamination by egg white. Mayo can be made with yolks only, with whole eggs, or with mixed yolks and whole eggs.
 
Although I've done it in the past, I no longer make mayo by hand. Arthritis won't allow it. Of all the power tools in the kitchen, the best for this job is a blender. A stand mixer with whip works only if you're making a lot of mayo. As you found out, the whip doesn't enter deeply enough into the ingredients with a standard recipe. A mini-food processor works well too.
 
I've seen dozens of mayo recipes, and they're all essentially the same. F'rinstance, my basic recipe is:
 
Have everthing at room temperature. BTW, eggs should always be at room temperature before you cook them in any recipe. It does make a difference.
 
Put into a blender container
 
2 egg yolks
1 whole egg
1 tbls French style mustard (any prepared mustard will do, in fact)
Grind of black pepper
Pinch of salt
Juice of one lemon
 
Turn on the blender and let it run ten-15 seconds to thoroughly combine ingredients. Then, with the machine still running, add 2 cups oil, a drop at a time. As others have noted, use a light, neutral oil until you get the technique down. Then you can play with other oils.
 
When all the oil has been added turn off the machine. Taste the mayo, and adjust the seasonings. Whirl it a few more seconds to thicken up and scrape into a non-reactive bowl.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 17:53
Various mixers, blenders, food processors, etc. can be made to work, but I'm of the old-school opinion that you should really learn how to do it by hand first.  Hands-on, face in the bowl, and your own sweat invested tends to lead to better-learned lessons that you can then apply to machine-assisted techniques.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 17:59
You get no argument from me on that, Daikon. And, frankly, I'd prefer making it by hand, if I were still able to.
 
My point was simply that it takes a lot more whisking to make mayo than most people are aware. And that the oil needs to be added very slowly, whether making the mayo by hand or machine.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 18:05
Yup.  Have you ever come across something like Ruhlman's comment, linked above, that insufficient water can lead to early failure of the emulsion?  I can't say that I have seen that before, nor have I seen a solid explanation of the science for why that would be the case, but maybe a few more drops of water or acid at the beginning would help (or wouldn't hurt.)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 18:48
Ooooo, if you want to geek-out on mayo, here's a pretty good resource: http://foodsci.wisc.edu/courses/fs532/01mayonnaise.html

Among many interesting components of that lab manual discussion is this particular note:

Indeed, with this consideration in mind, it is probable that the only reason that a stable mayonnaise emulsion is possible is due to the presence of the mustard. The mustard presumably operates as a finely-divided solid in stabilization of the mixture.

It is definitely possible to achieve an emulsion with a fresh egg yolk and without mustard, but it probably won't be stable for days without the mustard....

Another interesting bit: hard water can make the emulsion unstable.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2012 at 03:32
Have you ever come across something like Ruhlman's comment, linked above, that insufficient water can lead to early failure of the emulsion?
 
I must have missed that. Only comment I picked up on about water was using it to thin the mayo if it was too thick.
 
Normally I have a lot of respect for Ruhlman. But I don't understand either of these statements.
 
There must be some science behind the one you quote, but I can't guess what it is. My recipe doesn't use any water. I make Eric Ripert's truffled aioli quite often, and it doesn't use any water either.
 
Patterson, in his Sauces, does not include water. Listed as ingredients for traditional mayonnaise are egg yolks, mustard, salt, white pepper, wine vinegar or lemon juice, and safflower oil. And he stresses the traditional ratio of one cup oil to one egg yolk.
 
BTW, Patterson also says a broken mayonnaise can be brought back together by beating the broken mixture bit by bit into a fresh egg yolk. Basically, you use the broken sauce as if it were oil. I have no idea if this is true or not. But Patterson also says that mayo will not hold in the fridge overnight without separating, and I know that's not true.  
 
As to the other, I can't imagine mayo that is too thick, nor any reason to thin it. A true aioli is thin, compared to mayo. But if that's what you want, you make one. Many people think an aioli is merely garlic-flavored mayo, but such is not the case. A true aioli is a beaten (as opposed to whipped) emulsion, and will never achieve the fluffyness of mayo.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2012 at 03:33
In Spain, making home made Mayonnaise and home made Garlic Ali Oli is very common ... So, here are my traditional Spanish recipes for the two types ... and some tips:
 
TRADITIONAL HOME MADE MAYONNAISE
 
* LARGE METAL BOWL ONLY
* A STURDY LARGE WHISK
 
2 egg yolks
 
a pinch of regular salt ( do not use sea salt or kosher salt ) ( *** and ur spices )
 
16. fl. oz. high quality extra virgin olive oil ( if you can obtain a Green variety Spanish one like Hojiblanca 100% or Arbequina 100% from BORGES ( they import to USA ), this is even the better ) 
  
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice from the citrus fruit
 
1) beat the yolks in a metal bowl only until creamy and add pinch of salt to mixture ( and ur spices )
 
2) very slowly, drizzle and pour to incorporate olive oil, whisking at a quick beat by hand constantly until thick ( do not use a food processor or electric mixer ) AND ONLY MIX IN 1 DIRECTION
 
3) when it is not possible to add more of the olive oil, you shall notice that it floats on surface and does not combine
 
4) add the lemon juice to taste and Bottle this concoction in refrigerator overnight or 48 hours
 
5) then, it shall be perfect mayonnaise
 
TRADITIONAL SPANISH ALI OLI
 
**** a large metal bowl
*** a sturdy good brand whisk
*** a mortar
*** a pestle
 
4 large garlic cloves
5 fl. oz. E.V. Olive Oil
1 tsp. salt ( do not use sea salt or kosher salt )
 
1) in mortar, crush and smash the garlic cloves with salt to form a thick thick paste
2) add the E.V. olive oil a few drizzles at a time and very slowly and WHISK ONLY IN 1 DIRECTION
3) continue whisking until a creamy white ivory emulsion forms
4) when this is achieved, do NOT add any more olive oil
5) the garlic has reached its capacity to emulsify
6) continuing shall cause the the Ali Oli to break up and separate
 
Best of luck with this and keep me posted.
 
I make my own all the time, and if you follow this, you should succeed !
Margi.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2012 at 06:08

How to make a fantastic mayo in... 15 seconds;

You will not believe how easy it is to make a fantastic white, dense and tasty mayo. I'm very convinced you will not find a better commercial mayo!

Must-haves; a narrow mixing container (use the one that came with your hand-mixer) and yes, a hand-mixer or whatever you call that thing.

Break 1 whole egg (yolk + white) in the container, add 2 generous teaspoons of Dijon-style mustard, pinch of salt and pepper and 1 tbsp of white vinegar. I use my simple to make tarragon vinegar. Gently add around 300 ml oil. I use sunflower, any other oil works fine too, as long as it's no motoroil or other industrial types. (300 ml oil should be around 1/3 of a quarter??).

VERY IMPORTANT; plunge the mixer in but do not start it until it's at the bottom and the blades are in contact with the egg. Now start the mixer but do NOT move the mixer until you feel that the emulsion (mayo) starts to form. This will only take around 5 seconds. Then very gently move the mixer up and down. The whole mixing takes no longer than... 15 seconds!

Taste for seasoning. I always add another tbsp of tarragon vinegar. You could use lemon juice instead. Your mayonnaise should look like this;

How to make tarragon vinegar; http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/my-secret-flavoring-agents-tweaked-vinegars_topic1836.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2012 at 06:41
I shall try yours too even though mine is tried and true, yours is surely quite tasty.  
Thanks for posting.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2012 at 03:19
Originally posted by ChrisBelgium ChrisBelgium wrote:


Break 1 whole egg (yolk + white) in the container, add 2 generous teaspoons of Dijon-style mustard, pinch of salt and pepper and 1 tbsp of white vinegar. I use my simple to make tarragon vinegar. Gently add around 300 ml oil. I use sunflower, any other oil works fine too, as long as it's no motoroil or other industrial types. (300 ml oil should be around 1/3 of a quarter??).

agents-tweaked-vinegars_topic1836.html


34 ml is equal to 1 US fluid ounce Chris, so it would be just under 9 ounces or a little over 1 cup.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2012 at 05:28
.....or a little over 1 cup.
 
Putting it right on the rule-of-thumb of one cup oil for each egg.
 
 
 
edited to reflect the fact that "egg" is spelled with two gs
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2012 at 08:21

say, everyone ~ thak you for so many great replies - lots of useful food for thought here.

daikon's suggestion appeals to me, as a great way to get down into some fundamentals. i think i will begin with that, and then progress my way up from there. chris, margi and brook, thanks to all of you for putting things into perspective for me as well. with so many good comments, i believe i can bring this into focus a bit.
 
we'll see what happens!
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