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Making stock from various wild game

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Joined: 25 January 2010
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    Posted: 26 February 2019 at 08:53
From The Hunting and Fishing Library:

Quote Good stock is fundamental to good cooking. It is used as the base for sauces, and as the cooking liquid in many recipes. Game stock is usually made by boiling the bones of big-game animals, birds or small game, usually with vegetables or seasonings. It adds more flavor to recipes than commercial beef or chicken broth. For convenience, freeze stock in 1-cup batches or can it in a pressure cooker. Leave 1/2-inch space in pint jars; process at 10 pounds pressure for 20 minutes.


Venison Stock:

Browning the bones in the oven makes the stock rich and dark. Venison stock requires long cooking to bring out all the flavor from the large bones. This recipe will produce about three quarts of stock.

Enough deer, antelope, elk or moose bones to fill stockpot (5 to 10 pounds)
4 to 6 carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
3 or 4 stalks of celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 medium onions, cut into quarters
2 bay leaves
10 whole black peppercorns
4 or 5 sprigs of fresh parsley
1 sprig fresh thyme, or 1/2 tsp. dried thyme leaves

Arrange bones in roasting pan. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Roast until well-browned, about one hour, turning bones once during roasting. Transfer bones to stockpot.

Loosen browned bits from roaster by stirring, adding 1 cup water if necessary. Pour liquid into large measuring cup. Skim fat and discard. Add liquid to stockpot.

Add remaining ingredients to stockpot. Cover bones with cold water. Heat to boiling over medium-high heat. Reduce heat. Skim foam from top of stock. Simmer for about 8 hours, skimming periodically, adding water as necessary to keep bones covered.

Strain stock through a double thickness of cheesecloth. Discard bones and vegetables. Pour stock into stockpot. Heat to boiling over medium-high heat. Cook until reduced to about 3 quarts. Cool slightly. Refrigerate overnight. Skim any solidified fat from top.


Game Bird Stock:

Pheasant, partridge, grouse, turkey or any waterfowl work best. Save the backbone and neck when portioning birds, and any bones left after boning, until you have enough to make stock game bird stock cooks quicker than venison stock. This recipe will produce about three cups of stock.

1.5 to 2 pounds uncooked game bird backs and bones
1 small onion, quartered
1 stalk celery, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 carrot, cut into 1-inch pieces
1/4 cup snipped, fresh parsley
1/2 tsp. dried marjoram leaves
1/2 tsp. dried thyme leaves
6 whole black peppercorns
2 whole cloves
1 bay leaf
1.25 tsp. salt (optional)
4 to 6 cups water

In large saucepan, combine all ingredients, adding enough water to completely cover the bones and vegetables. Heat to boiling over medium-high heat. Reduce heat. Skim foam from top of stock. Simmer for 1-1/2 to 2 hours, skimming periodically. Strain through a double thickness of cheesecloth. Discard bones and vegetables. Cool stock slightly. Refrigerate overnight. Skim any solidified fat from top.


Rabbit Stock:

Follow recipe for game bird stock, substituting 1.5 to 2 pounds rabbit backs, ribs and other bones for the game bird bones. Continue as directed, cooking 2 to 2.5 hours.


Note: If you make a large batch of stock, you may want to try a technique used by professional chefs. Prepare the stock without adding salt, then strain it through a double thickness of cheesecloth. Allow the strained stock to cool completely, then skim off any fat. Boil the strained, skimmed stock until it is reduced by half to make a demi glace (half-glaze), which is the base for many classic French sauces. Reducing the demi glace even further produces a hard, rubbery glaze that can be cut into small chunks and frozen. A small chunk of the glaze added to a sauce or braising liquid intensifies the flavor of the dish without adding liquid. If a recipe calls for a teaspoon of instant bouillon granules, you can substitute a small chunk of glaze and a bit of salt.

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