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manchego and gruyere

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Tom Kurth View Drop Down
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    Posted: 21 January 2017 at 20:28
There is a large Walmart about 35 miles from home that keeps imported parmesan and/or romano cheeses so I made a detour on the way home from work this AM since I was about out of same. Had too much money in my pocket so I also picked up some gruyere and manchego, as well. Don't really know what to do with them, especially the manchego. Figured I would get better ideas here than from the internet. So, how 'about it, what ya got for me?
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Tom

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 January 2017 at 02:36
Gruyere is the traditional topping for French onion soup Tom...melted over the top.

Not really sure about the Manchego
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 January 2017 at 06:47
Manchego is one of Spain's iconic cheeses, Tom. It's made from sheep's milk, and originates in La Mancha---hence the name.

It's a hard cheese with a nutty flavor (some say it resembles Brazil nuts) and notes of caramel. The older the cheese the more depth of flavor it has.

Texture is kind of self-contradictory, as it is at once dry, but creamy.

Manchego can be eaten out of hand, or used for cooking. Well aged manchego is often marinated in aromatic green olive oil (along with herbs), which intensifies the flavors of both.

Manchego Croquettes---often served with a quince sauce---are a fairly common tapas, with many variations on the theme. This one is adapted from a recipe by Janet Mendel as it appears in “Spain And The World Table”:

1 lb 4 oz russet potatoes     
3/4 tsp salt
2 tsp evoo
1 2/3 cup grated Manchego (loosely packed)
2 tsp minced green onions
3 tbls finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Pinch thyme
Pinch hot pimento or cayenne
3 large eggs, divided use
3/4 tsp red wine vinegar
2/3 cup dry breadcrumbs
1 quart olive oil for frying
2/3 cup Quince Sauce if using     

Place the unpeeled potatoes in a saucepan, cover with 8 cups water. Add ¼ teaspoon salt and bring to a gentle boil over medium high heat. Cover partially and cook until tender, about 30 minutes. Drain. Return potatoes to pot, cover tightly, and let sit 5 minutes.

Using a towel or oven mitt to prevent burning your hand, cut each potato in half. Scrape out the flesh into a bowl and discard skins. Add the oil and mash the potatoes until smooth.

Stir the cheese into the potatoes. Add the green onion, parsley, ½ teaspoon salt, thyme, and pimeton.

Separate two of the eggs. Place the whites in a medium clean dry bowl. Stir the yolks into the potato mixture. Beat the egg whites to stiff peaks. Beat in the vinegar until just combined. Fold half of the beaten whites into the potato mixture until thoroughly combined, then fold in the remaining whites.

Beat the remaining egg in a shallow bowl. Spread the breadcrumbs on a baking pan.

Scoop tablespoonfuls of the potato mixture onto a second baking sheet, then use your hands to shape the portions in balls or ovals. Drop the croquettes one at a time into the beaten egg and roll them to coat all sides. Lift each one with a spoon and fork, allowing excess egg to drip off. Transfer te drained croquette to the breadcrumbs. Working with up to six at a time, roll them in the crumbs to coat all sides. Transfer to a parchment-paper covered baking pan. Continue until all the potato mixture has been used.

Heat the oil in an 8-inch wide deep skillet to 360F. Fry the croquettes in batches of six, turning them once with a slotted spoon, and transfer to a baking sheet lined with paper towels. Hold the finished croquettes in a warm oven until ready to serve.

Quince Sauce

6 tbls membrillo (quince paste)
2 tsp Sherry vinegar
1/3 cup hot water
     
Combine ingredients in a blender on low speed until smooth, 5-10 secons. Serve at room temperature or slightly warmed. Sauce will keep in the refrigerater
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 January 2017 at 07:17
Here’s another possibility, Tom:

Ensalada De Queso Y Rabanos
(Cheese & Radish Salad)


14 oz fresh Manchego
7 oz ham
5 radishes, sliced
12 walnuts, halved
1 tbls chopped parsley
5 oz arugula or other lettuce greens, rinsed and shredded
2 tbls white-wine vinegar
6 tbls olive oil
Salt & pepper

Cut the cheese and ham into ¾-inch strips. Put the cheese, ham, radishes, walnuts, parsley and lettuce in a salad bowl and mix together.

In a bowl beat the vinegar with a pinch of salt with a fork, then beat in the oil and add pepper to taste. Pour the dressing over the salad just before serving.

Adapted from “The Book of Tapas.”




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 January 2017 at 10:22
I've made some nice grilled cheese sandwiches with Gruyere.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 January 2017 at 10:59
Just opened those cheeses: The manchego is quite reminiscent of an imported parmesan. The gruyere is something else indeed.  Upon opening the package I was overwhelmed with the odor of dead mouse. Being of an adventurous nature, I sampled it anyway. Kinda sweet and nutty, but is it REALLY supposed to smell that way? You sure got some 'splainin to do, Lucy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 January 2017 at 20:17
Gruyere can have a slight funkiness about it, Tom. But dead mouse is kind of an overstatement. The cheese, itself, should smell clean, and have an earthy, nutty flavor.

Often misidentified as French, gruyere is actually from Switzerland, and is the basic cheese used in fondue. Obviously, it's a great melting cheese, and works beautifully in any such application. As Melissa points out, it's great in a grilled cheese sandwich; either alone or mixed with other cheeses.

I suspect the piece you got has been in the package for some time, leading to the heavy aroma. Let it air a bit and see if the smell doesn't dissipate.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 January 2017 at 07:32
Bunuelos con Chorizo y Queso
(Chorizo and Cheese Puffs)


1 cup all-purpose flour
¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
3 eggs, separated
2 tbls evoo
¾ cup warm beer
½ tsp salt
Black pepper
4 cups peanut or corn oil
10 oz Spanish chorizo, casing removed and finely chopped
3 tbls chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 cup grated Manchego

Sift the flour into a bowl. Add the red pepper flakes and mix well. Lightly beat the egg yolks. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and add the egg yolks, olive oil, beer, salt, and pepper. With a spoon mix well but do not allow the batter to get stringy. Let rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

In a deep saucepan, heat the oil to 375F. A drop of batter shold sizzle when dropped into the oil.

Meanwhile, heat a frying pan over medium heat and cook the chorizo, stirring occasionally, until it begins to turn golden, about 3 minutes.

In a clean bowl, beat the egg whites until they form stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites, chorizo, parsley, and cheese into the batter. Drop the batter by heaping tablespoonfuls into the hot oil. Cook, turning occasionally, until golden, 2-3 minutes. Drain on paper towels.

Place on a platter and garnish with parsley leaves. Serve immediately

Adapted from “From Tapas to Meze,” Joanne Weir, Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, CA., 2004

Saganaki
(Fried Cheese with Lemon and Olives)


Note: This is a meze originally using the Greek cheese Kephalotyri, Gruyere substitutes perfectly.

Olive oil for frying
1 ½ lb chunk Kephalotyri or Gruyere about ½ inch thick
1 cup all-purpose flour
Juice of 1 lemon
Dried oregano
Cracked black pepper
3 lemon wedges
12 kalamata olives

Heat ½ inch of olive oil in a small frying pan over medium-high heat. As soon as it ripples, reduce the heat to medium-low.

Cut the cheese into sticks ½-inch wide. Place in a bowl of water. Place the flour in a separate bowl. Remove the sticks of cheese from the water and immediately place them in the flour. Do not tap off the excess.

Fry the cheese sticks in a single layer until golden and crusty, turning them with a fork, 1-2 minutes per side. They should be soft all the way through but not melting.

Serve immediately on a warm platter drizzled with lemon juice. Sprinkle with oregano and cracked black pepper. Garnish with lemon wedges and olives.

Note: These must be served hot, or the cheese turns rubbery.

Adapted from “From Tapas to Meze,” Joanne Weir, Ten Speed Press, Berkely, CA., 2004

Gougere
(Pate’ Choux Puffs)


Gougere can be thought of as a savory version of cream puffs. While they are made with all sorts of cheezes, Gruyere is the traditional choice. The following is my own recipe; a composite of several others.

1 cup cold water
1 stick (1/4 lb) butter, cut in small pieces
1 tsp salt
Dash pepper
1 cup sifted flour
4 eggs
¼ lb gruyere, grated
Dash of dry mustard
Milk for brushing

In a saucepan, bring to boil the water, butter, salt, and pepper. Once butter is melted, add flour all at once, and cook the paste over low heat, beating well with a wooden spoon, until it forms a ball and leaves the sides of the pan.

Remove pan from heat. Let paste cool about five minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition until the shine goes away. Add the cheese and dry mustard. Mix well.

Pre-heat oven to 425F. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Place 2 tablespoons of mixure on sheet. Repeat, spacing gougeres about an inch apart. Brush each with milk.

Bake for 10 minutes. Lower heat to 375F and bake an additional 25 minutes, until puffed and golden.

Cool on a wire rack. When cooled, store in an airtight container. If more than a few hours before use, keep in refrigerate until ready to use and reheat gently in oven.





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