Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Asia > The Middle East
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Manna From Heaven
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Manna From Heaven

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4155
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Manna From Heaven
    Posted: 27 June 2017 at 04:57
This is a double post, from the bread forum. It just seems to fit here, as well.

If you choose to participate in this thread (and I hope you do), please make your posts at the bread thread. Thanks.

Y’all remember the time several of us set off on a discovery regarding Mesopotamia, barley, and how bread was made in the ancient world? Instead of doing something useful, like shooting craps in a back ally, we cumulatively spent months researching and experimenting and, all in all, having a roaring great time.

For you newer members, the record of that activity can be found here: http://www.foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/babylonian-bread_topic3336.htmlhttp://www.foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/babylonian-bread_topic3336.html

Now I’m off on another such hunt, and I hope many of you will join me. The object of today’s lesson: Ezekiel Bread.

Haven’t heard of it? This is, and isn’t, surprising. On one hand, it’s not a common product, available in every bread isle. On the other, the internet is filled will references and recipes for it.

I had no idea what Ezekiel bread was until seeing it used as a basket ingredient in a Chopped episode. In fact, I’d never even heard of it. It appeared to be a whole grain bread, and was said to be very healthy. I was intrigued, and did a quick search. Turns out, the internet is covered up with references. Who knew?

The bread is named after chapter 4:9 in the Old Testament book of Ezekiel, which translates to: “Take wheat and barley, beans and lentils, millet and spelt; put them in a jar, and use them to make bread for yourself.” Thus, it is sometimes called Ezekiel 4:9. And, because some scholars believe this is actually the manna the Israelites depended on out in the desert, it can sometimes be found as Manna Bread.

Nutritionally, Ezekiel bread is nothing short of incredible. Presuming this discussion takes off, we’ll have much to say about that as we progress. But, in short, it is high protein (comparable to milk or eggs, in fact), contains all 18 essential amino acids; promotes digestibility and the absorption of minerals; increased the bioavailability of vitamins; and is a great source of fiber. Evidence indicates that some people with gluten sensitivity might be able to eat it with impunity. And those on low carb diets for health reasons---such as Type 2 diabetics---can actually benefit from eating it.

The secret behind all of this is sprouting. The grains and legumes used to make Ezekiel bread are first sprouted, then dried and ground into flour.

So, yes! As we discovered with making Mesopotamian bread, uncovering the actual process, prepping ingredients, and finding answers to many of the inherent questions, pretty much defined the quest. I suspect we’ll run into the same thing with this project.

For example: So far, all but one reference and recipe I’ve seen, for both home-made and commercially prepared Ezekiel bread, is for a risen loaf. But it seems to me, if this was the bread of a nomadic people, it’s more likely to have been a flatbread. And probably rather heavy and dense as well. Given that the grinding most likely was done in a form of mortar and pestle, I suspect it would have been a course flour, which would have contributed to the denseness.

Y’all remember how the Children of Israel yearned for the fleshpots of Egypt? Understandable if their menu mainstay was that sort of bread.

In case I haven’t been clear, I have not, as yet, actually made Ezekiel bread. So this will be a voyage of discovery for myself as well as anyone else coming along for the ride.

Let’s start with the sprouting. Most of us, at one time or another, have sprouted grains or legumes. As a foodstuff, sprouts are simple. Take a jar with a strainer lid. Put in a tablespoon or two of the appropriate seed. Cover with water. Let sit for a while, and drain. Then, once or twice a day, water and drain until the sprouts form.

For making bread, that approach won’t work because of the quantities required. We’re talking about ingredients measured in cupsful, not spoonsful. There are several approaches to this, but here’s the one I think most sensible.

Keep in mind that the grains and legumes will sprout at different rates. So do them separately. My guess is that starting the legumes a day or two ahead of the grains would work.

Put the grains/legumes in a large bowl. Fill with enough water to fully cover them. Some sources suggest the addition of a tablespoon of vinegar as well. Personally, I don’t think that’s necessary, but have not done a comparison.

Let the grains/legumes soak overnight and drain in a colander. Meanwhile, line a sheet pan with paper towels. Spread the grains/legumes out in an even layer and cover with dampened paper towels. Set in a warm location. Once or twice daily, refresh the paper towels. You want to keep them damp, but not soaking wet. Probably the best way of doing this is with a spray bottle.

Keep this process going until the grains/legumes have sprouted “tails” about a quarter inch long.

Next, dry the grains/legumes. In a dehydrator this will take about 18 hours. Alternatively, use an oven, overnight, at the lowest setting.

Grind the grains/legumes. Ideally, this will be done in a grain mill. Alternatively, a blender or food processor will get the job done. Once you have the flour made you can either freeze it in jars, or start making the Ezekiel bread. You can also freeze the dried, sprouted grains/legumes and grind them when ready to use.

Hey! Nobody said it would be easy! But no matter what other changes and amendments we make, this part is crucial.

I’m very intrigued by this bread. I’ll be gathering the ingredients this week, and get started soon.

If you plan on joining me for the ride, here are the ingredients will be using:

Wheat berries (about 3 cups)
Spelt (about 2 cups)
Barley (about ¾ cup)
Millet (about ¾ cup)
Green lentils (about 3/8 cup)
Soy, mung, or other starchy beans (about 8 tablespoons)


You’ll also need honey, olive oil, active dry yeast, and salt. But I presume you already have those as staples.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 783
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2017 at 10:19
I think I may have seen that episode of chopped, or at least another show that was talking about Ezekiel bread, not too long ago. It sounded interesting  to me. I think I might just join you on this ride.  My question is, what's the difference between sprouting and malting?

For example would you be able to use the malted barley that's used for beer instead of sprouting your own? Seems like exactly the same process, but from what I can tell it seems like the malting process is stopped when the roots grow from the seed, but in sprouting it's allowed continue until the actual sprout forms. Would that make a whole lot of difference?

Just thinking out loud here, but my feeble brain seems to think that the formation of the sprout would require conversion of a lot of the carbohydrates/sugars in the malted barley into energy for the sprout to grow so they would in fact be different.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4155
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2017 at 11:40
Mike, see my response in the bread forum.

I do hope you'll ride along. I think this is going to be fun.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7991
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 August 2017 at 13:07
Brook -

I am heading to Great Falls soon - probably over Labor Day Weekend the way things are shaping up. I will see if I can gather these up.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.