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molokhia ( Egyption Food)

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lamiaa View Drop Down
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Joined: 06 April 2015
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lamiaa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: molokhia ( Egyption Food)
    Posted: 06 April 2015 at 20:19

Directions for: Egyptian Molokhia
INGREDIENTS
4 cup chicken broth
3 bay leaves
Salt and pepper
2 lb(s) prepared molokhia leaves, purchased frozen and
thawed
6 clove garlic and minced
2 Tbsp cumin seed
½ cup olive oil
__________________________________
how to cooke :
1. Pour the broth into a soup pot and add , salt and
pepper and bring to a simmer. Add the molokhia and
season with salt and pepper. Stir well. Simmer for 20
minutes.
2. Pour the olive oil into a large skillet over medium high
heat. Stir in the garlic and cumin seed. Continue stirring
or swirling the pan. When the garlic is golden brown,
pour the hot oil over the surface of the simmering
molokhia . and serve immediately.

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2015 at 06:42
Hi, Lamiaa.

Glad you found your way to our little corner of the culinary world. We are a diverse group, with members from all over the globe. But you are, I believe, our first from Egypt.

You might head over to the members lounge and tell us a little about yourself, the things you like to cook, and so forth.

Meanwhile, I've got a question: What are molokhia leaves? I'm sure I'm not the only member unfamiliar with them. So if you can clarify it would be a big help.

And, again, welcome to the Foods of the World Forum.

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Hoser View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2015 at 02:07
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Hi, Lamiaa.

Glad you found your way to our little corner of the culinary world. We are a diverse group, with members from all over the globe. But you are, I believe, our first from Egypt.

You might head over to the members lounge and tell us a little about yourself, the things you like to cook, and so forth.

Meanwhile, I've got a question: What are molokhia leaves? I'm sure I'm not the only member unfamiliar with them. So if you can clarify it would be a big help.

And, again, welcome to the Foods of the World Forum.

From the little research I have done Brook...it appears that Molokhia is made from jute leaves, which I have never seen here in America. Jute is the plant used to make fiber for burlap bags, etc. I too, am wondering if there is a readily available substitute.

I suppose we could give it a try with frozen spinach and see what happens.

The dish sounds quite intriguing, and I'd like to give it a shot.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2015 at 07:39
it appears that Molokhia is made from lute leaves

Probably just a typo, Dave, but don't you mean jute? I don't know anything about molokhia, but jute is the fiber used for burlap.

FWIW, jute twine is what I use for my bean trellises, because it's biodegradable. At the end of the season the whole thing goes into the compost pile; vines, twine, and all.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2015 at 08:05

   Sounds like a wonderful dish!  I'm not entirely sure where the flavor profile would land with the molokhia, I've got no previous knowledge or experience with it.  I'll be interested to see if I can source it for a decent price.

   The construction of dish sounds really nice as well.  Simmering the leaves in a seasoned broth, then adding the hot garlic and cumin oil, nice!

   How would you recommend serving this?  I've seen some dishes where it's served over other proteins, such as chicken, etc.  I could see a wide range of uses...but what is common for you and your cooking/eating?

   All this aside, the molokhia seems to be incredibly nutritious...

    Nutritionally, it has three times the calcium and phospherous as Kale, and four times the amount of riboflavin. It also provides 70% of the RDA value for Vitamin C, 25% of the RDA of Vitamin A amongst a host of other minerals and vitamins. Put simply, it’s an extremely nutrient dense vegetable that’s widely eaten throughout the Middle East and Asia.

   Thanks for sharing...and welcome!
Enjoy The Food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2015 at 08:49
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:


I suppose we could give it a try with frozen spinach and see what happens.
The dish sounds quite intriguing, and I'd like to give it a shot



   After doing some reading, I may be inclined to use frozen spinach and okra too. There seems to be a texture aspect that spinach alone may miss.  But some form of spinach may be the best many of us can do...at least until we find a better source.
Enjoy The Food!
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Hoser View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2015 at 01:55
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

it appears that Molokhia is made from lute leaves

Probably just a typo, Dave, but don't you mean jute? I don't know anything about molokhia, but jute is the fiber used for burlap.

FWIW, jute twine is what I use for my bean trellises, because it's biodegradable. At the end of the season the whole thing goes into the compost pile; vines, twine, and all.

That was indeed a typo Brook (now corrected)

I think Dan's idea of frozen spinach and okra might be just the ticket.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2015 at 07:08
Interesting stuff.  However...

"Let's get one thing straight: it's not spinach nor can spinach be used as a substitute."

From The Egyptian Kitchen
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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2015 at 18:45
Originally posted by gracoman gracoman wrote:

Interesting stuff.  However...

"Let's get one thing straight: it's not spinach nor can spinach be used as a substitute."

From The Egyptian Kitchen


   This would certainly be a compromise...but spinach would only fill one part of the substitute, okra would be the other.  It seems okra is in the same mallow family as molokhia.  Molokhia has looks to have some qualities that are similar to spinach, in that it is leafy like spinach (it is sometimes called Egyptian spinach).  The other qualities look to be mallow qualities, thick, mucousy, stringy...this is where the okra would come in to produce these qualities.

   The author, stating spinach cannot be used as a substitute, may have a good point...but when cooking foods from around the world you have to come up with substitutes and compromises that capture the essence of what you cannot source.

     Graco, have you tasted molokhia?
Enjoy The Food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2015 at 11:58
I have used substitutes and compromises many times but never for the main ingredient.  Heck, the main ingredient is the name of the dish.  In this case, It seems a bit like substituting ham for beef when cooking a steak dinner Smile 

No. I haven't tasted molokia.  I've never even heard of molokia until now.  That's what makes it so interesting.  That and the nutritional profile.  I haven't found a source other than ordering seeds.  Perhaps  a Middle Eastern market.
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