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Mongolian Hot Pot Culture

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Karl View Drop Down
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Joined: 23 January 2012
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    Posted: 26 January 2012 at 17:30
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Despite my fixation on fondue pots, I do not own one of these yet.  I do have a few fondue pots that should work very well though.  I have picked up on a few tips like freezing the meat first so that you can slice it very thin and it will cook faster absorbing more flavor.  Despite its rarity here I am beginning to see that hot pot is more of a "culture" than just a cooking style.  Now I just have to convince my depressingly non-adventurous family to try it.

Does anyone happen to know any exciting dipping "soup" recipes for a hot pot?

http://chinesefood.about.com/od/festivalsandholidayfood/a/hotpot.htm

http://www.littlesheephotpot.com/

http://fantes.com/mongolian-hot-pot.html

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 January 2012 at 19:38
say, karl - i am really glad someone brought this topic into play! when my sister gave me a fondue set for Christmas a couple of years ago, i was intrigued by the idea of the mongolian hot pot, but haven't tried it yet. i may have one or two recipe that will work well for this. will check and see.
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GarethM View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 January 2012 at 08:04
I think I have some, will try and post on Monday

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 January 2012 at 05:58
Karl

Depending upon whether you are using fish or meat:
Vietnamese
1 Large fish head
8 cups water
3 spring onions/shallots
2" root ginger
1tp peppercorns
2 chicken stock cubes
2tbs fish sauce
2tbs sesame oil
1 lime (sliced)

Add fish, water, onions, ginger and peppercorns to a large pan.  Bring to boil, then simmer gently for 2 hours.  Cool and strain, then add the remaining ingredients and reheat.

Korean
4lbs beef rib bones
2lbs shin beef
4 slices of ginger
salt
cold water

Wash bones.  Add ingredients to a large pan and cover with cold water.  Bring to boil, remove any scum and simmer for 2-3 hours on a low heat.  Cool, strain, then reheat.

Gareth

PS I have never tried either, so I am offering them as is (can't find the recipe I used Cry )
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Karl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 February 2012 at 13:46
Gareth - Thank you!  Those both look good and relatively easy to do.  I especially would not have thought of ginger on my own.

Fish heads are not hard to come by locally but I am tempted to try one particular type of fish, an Irish Lord.



They are a VERY common local garbage fish.  They are not bad eating but it is amazing that something can live with such a huge head and tiny body.  I can barely get two fish sticks off of a 2' Irish Lord but if I need a head to boil down this will be interesting to try.   I have a whole salmon left in the freezer until the fishing weather improves.  

Would you suggest sticking to just seafood in the Vietnamese fish based "soup" or would chicken and beef taste OK cooked in it too?  I do have two electric fondue pots that should work fine if the fish soup sounds wrong.







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GarethM View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 February 2012 at 03:07
Karl

I have only used my steamboat twice and should really use it more. We stuck to fish with the fish stock and meat with meat stock.  You would bulk it up with a selection of finely cut vegetables.

I did find chilling the meat allowed me to slice it more thinly, so we had a selection of beef, chicken and lamb.  The resulting soup after we had cooked and eaten the meat and veg was delicious.

I can heartily recommend  trying them, it is a very social/sharing meal.  An electric fondue seems quite a good option, as one of the reasons why I so rarely used it, was that it was a pain lighting the BBQ coals then dropping them down the centre stem.

Have fun
Gareth
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