Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > The Best Foods You Can Get - Your Own > Gardening
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - My Seed List - 2012
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

My Seed List - 2012

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4819
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: My Seed List - 2012
    Posted: 10 October 2012 at 13:20
Here is the list of historic garden seed I'll have available this year.
 
Some of it is still drying, but all seeds will be available starting mid-November. Some of it is in limited supply, so it doesn't hurt to get your orders in early. I'll fill them on a first-come, first-served basis.
 
All seed was grown in the historic gardens at Fort Boonesborough SP, and represents something that would have been grown in colonial and federalist Virginia. In many cases, it's the actual variety that would have appeared in those gardens and farm fields.
 
All seed sales help support my continuing work preserving these heirlooms.
 
When ordering, please make checks payable to Historic Foodways.
 

HISTORIC FOODWAYS

PO BOX 519

RICHMOND, KY 40476

859-623-2765

 HistoricFoodways@hotmail.com

 

 

2013 HISTORIC SEED LIST

 

1. Amber Globe Turnip:  A yellowish-white, sweet tasting turnip, similar to the extinct Dutch Yellow that was popular in the 18th century. Amber Globe can be dated previous to 1840.

 

2. Brown Flax:  Fibers from flax were used to make linen. The brown is more fibrous than the more popular Blue Flax grown today for its oil-rich seeds. Brown Flax can be dated previous to 1700.

 

3. Bull Nose Pepper:  Originally a small, not particularly sweet pepper used to make “mangoes.” Breeders in the 19th century kept selecting for size and sweetness until creating a full-sized bell pepper; the #1 commercial bell pepper by the end of the century. Bull Nose can be dated previous to 1800.

 

4. Clabbord Bean:  An 18th century pole bean that was grown up the sidewalls of buildings, in the clapboards, thus providing its name. Currently available under the name “Caseknife Bean,” Clabbord can be dated by name previous to 1796.

 

5. Crookneck Squash:  A warted, yellow summer squash, grown by Native Americans and early settlers. Crookneck can be dated previous to European contact.

 

6. Fire-Creek Okra:  Grown by the Fife family of southern Mississippi since being gifted with seed by a Creek woman visiting them from the Indian Nations. It’s large pods remain tender when as much as 7 inches long. Fife-Creek, which may be a variant of the Texas Cowhorn variety, can be dated previous to 1890.

 

7. Jimmy’s White Cucumber:  White cucumbers were well known in the 18th century. This one is a full-sized cuke grown in the same Kentucky family for more than 100 years. Jimmy’s White can be dated previous to 1890.

 

8. KY Flat Tan Field Pumpkin:  A light tan colored culinary pumpkin of the “cheese” type, this is one of the sweetest eating pumpkins around. Rampant vines produce well, with fruits to about 25 pounds. A Kentucky heirloom, Flat Tan can be dated to the late 19th century.

 

9. Large Red Tomato:   A popular commercial tomato in the last quarter of the 19th century, Large Red’s size and shape is typical of the tomatoes grown in the 18th century. Large Red can be dated previous to 1875.

 

10. Long Standing Kale:   A heat-tolerant kale variety long grown in the middle ground, primarily in Tennessee, which is the original source of this seed. No definitive dating is available for Long Standing Kale.

 

11. Orinoco Tobacco:  Originally grown by John Rolfe at Jamestown in 1611 from seed smuggled out of South America, this is the most common tobacco grown in America previous to 1800. Orinoco can be dated previous to 1600.

 

12. Plum Granny:  A naturalized, non-edible melon, with a pleasing aroma, often used to cover body odor. Small, colorful, and aromatic. Can be dated previous to European contact.

 

13. Scarlet Runner Bean: A true runner bean with showy red flowers, large seeds, and long pods, brought to North America by English colonists in the 1600s.

 

14. Sugar Pea:  A pole type cowpea with a sweeter flavor than black-eyed peas, although smaller in size. Sugar Peas can be dated at least to the early 19th century, and may be older than that.

 

15. Va. Gourdseed Corn:  A white dent variety, grown by Native Americans and early settlers in southern Virginia and the Carolinas. Tall (10-12 feet) stalks produce two ears with large, flattish, kernels that resemble the seed of gourds. Va. Gourdseed can be dated previous to 1600.

 

16. Whippoorwill Cowpea:  A bush type cowpea, Whippoorwill was the most popular cowpea previous to the Civil War. This line has been in the same family since at least 1820. Whippoorwill can be dated previous to 1800.

 

17. Yellow Pear Cherry Tomato:  A bright yellow, teardrop-shaped cherry tomato often used to make preserves. Yellow Pear can be dated previous to 1720.

 

 

 

 

ORDER FORM

HISTORIC FOODWAYS

PO BOX 519

RICHMOND, KY 40476

859-623-2765

 HistoricFoodways@hotmail.com

 

Ship to:

 

Name________________________________________________

 

Street_________________________________________________

 

City________________________________State_____ Zip_____

 

Phone _____  ___________________  Email__________________

 

 

ITEM

UNIT PRICE

NUMBER

EXTENDED PRICE

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

$3.25

 

 

 

                                                                                                 SUBTOTAL: ____________

 

                                                                           SHIPPING & HANDLING: _______________

 

                                                                                       TOTAL ENCLOSED: _______________

 

 

                                                      Ordering Information

 

Historic seeds are packaged as starter packs, with a minimum of 25 seeds per pack.

 

Shipping and handling costs are based on the value of your order, according to the following schedule:

 

                        Up to $12.00:   $3.00                                     $60.01 - $72.00:     $17.00

                        $12.01 - $24.00:   $6.00                                  $72.01 - $85.00:     $19.00

                        $24.01 - $36.00:   $9.00                                  $85.01 - $100.00:   $21.00

                        $26.01 - $48.00:   $12.00                                $101.00 - $150.00: $25.00

                        $48.01 - $60.00:   $15.00                             More than $150.00: $30.00

 

Make checks or money orders payable to Historic Foodways.

 

 

THANK YOU FOR YOUR ORDER!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 October 2012 at 13:30
very cool, brooke - i see a couple-three i would be quite interested in, assuming they would do well in montana's climate and growing season.
 
i've got a couple of irons in the fire, but will get in touch as i make plans for next year.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.090 seconds.