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My take on Chili and home-made tortillas

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Addtotaste View Drop Down
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Joined: 18 May 2012
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    Posted: 17 July 2013 at 11:29
This week my recipe is as above. With the ingredients we were given this is what I made. If you like it please click on the link below the recipe to vote.


Inspiration behind this recipe: I've never cooked with beef suet before but knew lard was normally used to make flour tortillas, so I looked for a recipe that used beef fat. That led me into the vast world of the Texas chilli. I got my inspiration and ideas there and created my own version from the wonderful ingredients we were given.


 

Ingredients

For the chilli

200g beef suet
500g beef shin
2 tsp (heaped) chilli powder
1 tsp (level) pepper
1 punnet PnP Soup Mix (carrot, leek, celery, tomato, turnip, potato)
1 Knorr Beef Stock Pot
62.5ml PnP White Wine Vinegar
1 PnP star anise
Water to cover
Salt to taste

For the tortillas

2 cups flour
2 tbsp beef tallow (melted beef suet)
1 cup water (more or less)
Salt to taste

To serve

1 onion, finely chopped
Cheese of your choice, grated

Method

Chilli

If you are using a Dutch oven, turn your oven on to 110 degrees Celcius.

Place the beef suet in a pan on a low heat and allow to melt. You need 4-5 tbsp plus 2 tbsp for the tortillas.

Cut shin into cubes and place in a bowl (put any bones to one side). Add the chilli powder and pepper to the bowl and make sure the meat is covered.

When you have the desired amount take the pieces of suet out. You can also render all and put what is left over in a bowl. Allow to cool, cover, refrigerate and use later. Remove 2 tbsp of tallow for tortillas and brown meat in pot. When seared on all sides, place meat in a Dutch oven or slow cooker.

Fry finely chopped celery and carrot (from Soup Mix) until soft, deglaze pan with vinegar and pour all into your cooking vessel. Pop the Knorr Stock Pot in and pour in enough water to cover 3 quarters.

Turn slow cooker on low or place Dutch oven into your oven and allow to cook for several hours (I left it overnight).

Tortillas

Mix flour and salt. Add tallow and mix. Slowly add water until the dough becomes soft, kneading as you go. Cover with a towel and allow to rest for a few minutes.

Warm a pan on a medium heat. Roll dough into even balls. Then roll each ball out into tortillas (I used a tortilla press. Fry them in the pan and leave on one side until they just start puffing up and then flip them over.

To serve

Serve warm with tortillas, grated cheese and onion on the side.

 

To vote go here


Check out some more recipes and reviews - www.addtotaste.co.za
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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 July 2013 at 05:42
ADD TO TASTE,

Hope all is going well for you and your´s ... 

For a South African, you have done quite a wonderful job on Tex - Mexican ... Compliments to the Home Gourmet ... 

All my best.
Margaux Cintrano. 

www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
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Joined: 18 May 2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Addtotaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 July 2013 at 09:23
Thank you Margi and thank you for posting my links on your Facebook :)
Check out some more recipes and reviews - www.addtotaste.co.za
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 July 2013 at 11:12
Looks great, and I really like the idea of using beef shin - here in America, the focus is (in my opinion) too much on "ground beef," leaving a lot of nice cuts out in the cold that work perfectly for things like this.
 
I tried to vote, but I must not be able to from work. Will do so when I get home!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Muleskinner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 July 2013 at 18:11
I'm real fond of this type of meat in chili.  I've been using home canned venison lately, which doesn't look like much in the jar, but the chili is great.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2013 at 05:55
I've never understood the fascination with ground meat for chili. To me, that just makes a sauce.

I want some "tooth" to the meat, and have always used and recommended shredded meat. Competition chili is almost 100% small dice.

Venison makes the best chili, Muleskinner. What I do is, while breaking down the deer, save all those little bits and pieces that otherwise get left behind. These all go in a separate freezer bag and are used specifically for chili.

Depending on the size of the animal, I can typically get as much as three pounds of "chili meat" that most other hunters throw away.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2013 at 09:17
    Looks great! 

  Now I can't wait for things to cool down a little!!!

nice job!
Enjoy The Food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 February 2015 at 21:17
shall try again, I do use chopped meat when I make chili, however I use a 8 or 10 mm plate most of the time as I am using scraps and my wife does not like meat unless it is at least coarse chopped.
The original chili was a way to use up meat that was going bad, the principal ingredients were meat, dried peppers, what ever was left over and corn or beans.
I make mine with meat, dried peppers, a potato, some beans or hominy or both and usually masa harina to thicken the broth.
It is basically a hash stew with plenty of peppers.
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