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Nasi Goreng Speciaal

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pitrow View Drop Down
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    Posted: 30 June 2020 at 09:25
As you may have guessed, the Dutch people have an affinity for Indonesian foods, based partly on their vast involvement in the spice trade of the 17th century. There is a whole feast dedicated to showcasing Indonesian foods, called rijsttafel (rice table), that typically consists of 40 or more small side dishes accompanying several different variations of rice main dishes. Unfortunately that will have to be a subject for another time as I don't have the time to go into it more right now. However, nasi goreng is almost always included as one of those dishes.

Nasi Goreng simply means fried rice in both the Indonesian and Malay languages. I'm guessing this Nasi Goreng Speciaal is akin to England's Tiki Masala, a very popular dish in the particular country, but not exactly authentic to what you'd find in the native country. As typical, there are probably millions of recipes for this around the interwebs. This is the recipe my family has used for a very long time, and my go-to when making Nasi.

Ingredients
1 pound of chicken or pork, diced very small
1 package of Nasi Goreng spices*
1 Tablespoon of canola oil
1 large onion, chopped very fine
2 Tablespoons grated fresh ginger
1 to 2 teaspoons of Sambal Oelek*
1 teaspoons of minced garlic
1/4 to 1/2 cup of Ketjap Manis*
2 or 3 eggs, slightly beaten
1 small head of green cabbage, sliced in very thin strips**
1/4 pound of bean sprouts (optional)
3 or 4 cups of cooked rice, cooked until dry and let cool***

* I've included links for some of the more "unusual" ingredients here so you can see what I use, however if you have a local Asian grocer I would suggest looking there before ordering online as it will be MUCH cheaper.
** I don't like as much cabbage, so I usually just use half a head.
*** I usually make just slightly more than a cup of raw jasmine rice. Up to about a cup and a half would work fine.

Directions
  • Cook the rice in a rice cooker according to appliance directions. When done, place it on a large platter or cookie sheet and let it cool completely.
  • Soak the Nasi Goreng spices in just a little boiled water for about 15 minutes, to rehydrate the vegetables.
  • In a large wok on medium heat add the oil.
  • When the oil is warm add the ginger, sambal oelek, garlic and onions to the wok. Saute for a few minutes before adding the soaked Nasi Goreng spices. Continue to cook, stirring constantly to prevent burning.
  • Add the meat and increase the heat to medium-high. Cook 2 minutes until the meat is almost done.
  • Make a small opening in the center of the wok and add the beaten eggs; stirring constantly until the eggs are set.
  • Mix the eggs with the meat mixture.
  • Add the cabbage (and bean sprouts if using), stir-frying them thoroughly. About 3 minutes.
  • Add the ketjap manis, and mix well.
  • Add the rice, a little at a time, stirring constantly, until all the rice is added.
  • Continue stir-frying for a few minutes until everything is well heated.
  • Season with salt to taste (I find it doesn't need any additional salt, ymmv)

Serve with additional sambal oelek on the side for those that like it really spicy.


Here's a picture from the batch I made this past weekend. On my finest china too Wink

Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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Hoser View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 June 2020 at 11:26
Sounds great Mike...slightly different technique than 
I have seen with Chinese or Japanese versions.,..didn't add any soy sauce either?

Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wannabebwana Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 June 2020 at 13:04
Looks good.

That's something I recently learned about fried rice after struggling for years to make something similar to what you get at a restaurant - you have to use cold rice!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 July 2020 at 10:06
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:

Sounds great Mike...slightly different technique than 
I have seen with Chinese or Japanese versions.,..didn't add any soy sauce either?



Ketjap Manis is a kind of sweet soy sauce, but other than that no. My mom always adds Maggi to her plate, which is kind of like soy sauce, but made with wheat instead of soy. I find it doesn't really need any additional salt so I usually don't add anything.
Mike
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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 July 2020 at 13:28
Originally posted by Wannabebwana Wannabebwana wrote:

Looks good.

That's something I recently learned about fried rice after struggling for years to make something similar to what you get at a restaurant - you have to use cold rice!!!


I've always struggled with that too. Another good tip is to make sure to rinse the rice several times before cooking (until the rinse water is clear) to get rid of some of the excess starch so it's not so sticky.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote crustyo44 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2020 at 22:21
A great recipe!! Our family also added diced Red, Green and Yellow capsicum, whatever was available.The cabbage and capsicum were only cooked to the "still crispy stage" We also cooked with Sambal Oelek and had Sambal Badjak on the table to add to your plate. A fried egg ( sunny side up) sometimes was added to the top of the rice. There never were any left overs. Even in the Army we had on wednesday Indonesian Food. This was a long standing tradition and is still adhered to I believe.
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