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Neck bones and rice

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Rod Franklin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Neck bones and rice
    Posted: 16 April 2012 at 20:08
This is soul food I guess. Made from cheap meat and cheap carbs. It tastes good with neck bones, but I didn't like the little bits of bone and gristle, so I updated it and here it is.

The ingredients:
3 pounds of pork spareribs, butcher cut into 2 inch lengths.
1/4 cup bacon fat
2 cups long grain white rice
1 tablespoon garlic powder
2 teaspoons crushed dry rosemary
1 tablespoon crushed dry coriander seeds
1 heaping teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 chopped red bell pepper
1 bunch of green onions chopped in 1/2" cuts
5 cups water

Here's a picture: Pork riblets and gristley parts, bacon fat, red bell pepper, bowl with garlic powder, rosemary, coriander seeds, black pepper and (invisible)salt, then rice, green onions and finally in the middle chopped yellow onion.


And a wee dram of something for the cook.


Fry the pork in the bacon fat till it's nice and brown all over. Don't use too high a heat. It took 25 minutes to get to this point.


Remove the meat from the pan and set it aside. Then into the pan goes the yellow onions. Don't turn up the heat and cook them till you're able to loosen all the brown goodness off the bottom of the pan.


As soon as you have the brown bits all loosened up add the rice and cook the rice till it just begins to brown. Stir it the whole time or things will get too brown real fast.


Remove the rice from the pot and set it aside. Put it in the bowl with the red bell pepper. Add the water to the pot and turn up the heat. Add all the spices and stir them in. Add the pork and bring it to a boil. Then lower the heat to simmer quickly with a tight lid on for 1 1/2 hours.


After the 1 1/2 hours has passed, remove the meat from the pot and separate the riblets from the gristley bits. Gristley bits are up front and riblets in the rear.


Measure the liquid in the pot. You should have 4 cups of liquid. Boil away or add water to get 4 cups. Now, add the rice and bell peppers to the pot and bring to a boil. Cover tightly and reduce the heat to pretty low and cook for 20 or 25 minutes. Meanwhile, strip the meat off the gristly bits. Your dog will love ya if give the critter the gristle!


This looks good to me!


Turn off the heat. Check for seasoning, add the meat, riblets and green onion to the pot and stir it all together. Put the lid back on it and wait 15 more minutes.

Dish it up!


Black eyed peas, your choice of greens, some cornbread and the cold beer of your choice.

If you were to balance a bowl of this on your head, your tongue would slap your brains out tryin' to get to it!Wink
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 April 2012 at 20:15
impressive, isn't it - how the "cheap" foods turn into something sooooo good? all that's needed is a little love and care!
 
great job, rod - the basic idea behind this dish reminds me, with a few differences, of Lovački Djuveč from serbia; that dish uses beef and different herbs/spices, but the basic idea is the same.
 
bravo!
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Hoser View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 April 2012 at 02:53
Great looking dish Rod...got me drooling early this morningWink

Go ahead...play with your food!
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Joined: 21 February 2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 April 2012 at 04:51
Oh, damn, Rod. Another cheap cut going the way of filet!
 
Nice tutorial, and a great looking meal.
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Rod Franklin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 April 2012 at 07:01
Thanks!

I was going to use pork hocks and a few country style ribs, or just more neck bones, but when I got to the store, no neck bones, and fresh pork hocks and country style ribs would have cost more money than the spareribs that were on sale. Go figure. So, ribs it was and I'm happy with the results.

Also, the procedure I outlined can be home styled a bunch too, and the following is more likely how it is presented where it is made regular. You can use just neck bones and eliminate the coriander and rosemary and green onions and even the bell pepper, then just throw everything except the rice in a pot and cook it till it's done, throw in the rice and cook it till it's done. Then just set the pot on the table and have at it. You can sort the neck bones out on your plate. Some tobasco and a beer and you're really low renting it.
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Rod Franklin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 January 2014 at 16:19
I made this again recently. It always satisfies. Here it is made with a leftover turkey carcass and the meat that was leftover and served with collard greens and cornbread. Good eats.


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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 May 2014 at 22:16
There's that home-cooked goodness again! 

Too often, leftover suffer the indignation of getting tossed into the trash, when the reality is that they are at the peak of flavour potential, since they have been sitting long enough for the flavours to get acquainted, fall in love and marry.

Excellent effort, Rod ~ it looks great!
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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 July 2015 at 06:56
   Looks like a great dish!  

    Really a well put together post too...thanks Rod!
Enjoy The Food!
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Tom Kurth View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 July 2015 at 16:33
Not long after we were married I brought home neck bones and made bones and kraut. That young bride told me to never bring those home again. I have since convinced her to eat ribs and kraut but the neck bones are still persona non gratis. I think riblets may be a worthy choice, especially with this recipe. Mouth is watering right now.
Best,
Tom

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 August 2015 at 02:40
I cook lamb neck in a similar fashion. Sadly there are not enough two headed sheep Wink.
My family love neck chops! They are also great slow cooked on the grill, but I have never seen pork neck chops here in NZ - I am now on a quest, thanks.
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