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New pork temps

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got14u View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote got14u Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: New pork temps
    Posted: 26 May 2011 at 12:01
The USDA came up with new pork temps....Here is a link for all of you
 
Jerod

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 May 2011 at 12:16
ehy, jerod - i saw this yesterday and all i could think of was how all those folks at the SMuF threw pork shoulders away over nothing.....
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got14u View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote got14u Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2011 at 10:47
LOL....I hear ya, that was a big thing over there wasn't it
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2011 at 14:19
What's a SMuF?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DIYASUB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 June 2011 at 15:17
 The change in cooking temperatures is long overdue. Modern methods of feeding hogs has pretty much ruled out trichnosis for decades now.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 June 2011 at 02:12
Originally posted by Rod Franklin Rod Franklin wrote:

What's a SMuF?


It's a reference to smoking meat forums, or smurfville as some of us like to call it.
A whole bunch of egos that you don't want to get involved with.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2014 at 09:47
Link above is dead, but here's a new one:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/safe-minimum-internal-temperature-chart/ct_index
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2014 at 10:19
Originally posted by DIYASUB DIYASUB wrote:

 The change in cooking temperatures is long overdue. Modern methods of feeding hogs has pretty much ruled out trichnosis for decades now.


While that's true (trichinosis is, for all intents and purposes, not an issue with domestic port---at least not in the U.S.), there's more to the story.

Modern hogs are much lower in fat than more traditional varieties. Cooking them to the older recommended temperature therefore leads to overcooking. The meat gets dried out.

There are exceptions, however. The butt, for instance, is still on the fatty side. So, when making pulled pork, low and slow, you want to reach higher temps so as to render out the fat. There's no problem going to 180F, or even 190. In fact, I did that just yesterday, and the meat was moist and tender as it's supposed to be.

On the other hand, if you can purchase pork from heritage varieties (which is a growing trend, btw), then the older recommendations can still apply.

Heritage varieties do not qualify as "the other white meat." But they have much better flavor. Unfortunately, when you can find them, the cost is on the high side.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 April 2014 at 07:16
Quote USDA

What foodborne organisms are associated with pork?
Pork must be adequately cooked to eliminate disease-causing parasites and bacteria that may be present. Humans may contract trichinosis (caused by the parasite, Trichinella spiralis) by eating undercooked pork. Much progress has been made in reducing trichinosis in grain-fed hogs and human cases have greatly declined since 1950. Today's pork can be safely enjoyed when cooked to an internal temperature of 145 °F as measured with a food thermometer before removing meat from the heat source. For safety and quality, allow meat to rest for at least three minutes before carving or consuming. For reasons of personal preference, consumers may choose to cook meat to higher temperatures.

Some other foodborne micro-organisms that can be found in pork, as well as other meats and poultry, are Escherichia coli,SalmonellaStaphylococcus aureusYersinia enterocolitica and Listeria monocytogenes. People can become infected with these bacteria by consuming raw or undercooked pork, or from the cross-contamination of food contact surfaces, such as countertops, cutting boards, utensils. These bacteria are all destroyed by proper handling and thorough cooking.

Chitterlings (made of large intestine of swine) can be contaminated with the bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica, which can cause a diarrheal illness called "yersiniosis." For more information, see our fact sheet: Yersiniosis and Chitterlings: Tips to Protect You and Those You Care for from Foodborne Illness.


Safe Cooking

For safety, the USDA recommends cooking ground pork patties and ground pork mixtures such as meat loaf to 160 °F. Cook all organ and variety meats (such as heart, kidney, liver, tongue, and chitterlings) to 160 °F. Cook all raw pork steaks, chops, and roasts to a minimum internal temperature of 145 °F as measured with a food thermometer before removing meat from the heat source. For safety and quality, allow meat to rest for at least three minutes before carving or consuming. For reasons of personal preference, consumers may choose to cook meat to higher temperatures.

For approximate cooking times for use in meal planning, see the attached chart compiled from various resources. Times are based on pork at refrigerator temperature (40 °F). Remember that appliances and outdoor grills can vary in heat. Use a meat thermometer to check for safe cooking and doneness of pork.

Can Safely Cooked Pork Be Pink?

Cooked muscle meats can be pink even when the meat has reached a safe internal temperature. If fresh pork has reached 145 °F throughout, even though it may still be pink in the center, it should be safe. The pink color can be due to the cooking method or added ingredients.

FRESH PORK: Safe Cooking Chart
Cook all raw pork steaks, chops, and roasts to a minimum internal temperature of 145 °F as measured with a food thermometer before removing meat from the heat source. For safety and quality, allow meat to rest for at least three minutes before carving or consuming. For reasons of personal preference, consumers may choose to cook meat to higher temperatures.

Fresh Pork: Safe Cooking Chart
CutThickness or WeightCooking TimeMinimum Internal Temperature & Rest Time
ROASTING: Set oven at 350 °F. Roast in a shallow pan, uncovered.
Loin Roast, Bone-in or Boneless2 to 5 pounds20 min. per pound145 °F and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes
Crown Roast10 pounds12 min. per pound
Leg, (Fresh Ham) Whole, Bone-in18 to 20 pounds15 min. per pound
Leg, (Fresh Ham) Half, Bone-in5 to 8 pounds22-25 min. per pound
Boston Butt3 to 6 pounds45 min. per pound
Tenderloin (Roast at 425-450 °F)½ to 1½ poundsTotal time: 20 to 27 min.
Ribs (Back, Country-style or Spareribs)2 to 4 pounds1½ to 2 hours (or until fork tender)
BROILING (4 inches from heat; turn once) or GRILLING (over direct, medium heat; turn once halfway through grilling)
Loin Chops, Bone-in or Boneless¾-inch or 1½ inchesTotal time: 8-9 or 12-16 min.145 °F and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes
Loin Kabobs1-inch cubesTotal time: 10-15 min.
Tenderloin½ to 1½ poundsTotal time: 20 min.
Ribs (indirect heat), all types2 to 4 pounds1½ to 2 hours
Ground Pork Patties (direct heat)½ inchTotal time: 8-10 min.160 °F
IN SKILLET ON STOVE
Loin Chops or Cutlets¼-inch or ¾-inchTotal time: 3-4 or 7-8 min.145 °F and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes
Tenderloin Medallions¼ to ½-inchTotal time: 4 to 8 min.
Ground Pork Patties½ inchTotal time: 8 to 10 min.160 °F
BRAISING: Cover and simmer with a liquid.
Loin Chops, Bone-in or Boneless¼ to ¾-inchTotal time: 6-8 min.145 °F and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes
Loin Cubes and Tenderloin Medallions½ to 1 inchTotal time: 8-10 min.
Shoulder Butt, Boneless3 to 6 pounds2 to 2½ hours
Ribs, all types2 to 4 pounds1½ to 2 hours
STEWING: Cover pan; simmer, covered with liquid.
Loin or Shoulder Cubes1 inch45 to 60 min. or until tender145 °F and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes
NOTE: Approximate cooking times were compiled from various resources.

 




 


Note that the fresh pork temperature guidelines are not to proper cooking temperature.  They don't specify the best temperature to cook a pork shoulder to, the temperature that they give are minimum temperatures for safe pork consumption.

  Hooray Pork!


Enjoy The Food!
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