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Orange-Cashew Chicken

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Hoser View Drop Down
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    Posted: 04 April 2012 at 02:14
This post is inspired by ERain...a friend at another forum. The original recipe is just orange chicken, but since I had some cashews and love them...I decided to toss them in as well.

First I got out the deep dryer and set if for 365°F and set up a breading station.

From rear to front...seasoned AP flour, egg, cornstarch:


Cut up a couple boneless skinless chicken breasts and dredged them:


Fried the chicken up in three batches, about 5-6 minutes per batch:


Then on to a towel-lined plate:


Next, three cups of orange juice are brought to a boil, and 1/3 cup brown sugar, 1 teaspoon ground ginger, 2 tablespoons soy sauce  and 1 tablespoon srirachia sauce are stirred in.


I let the sauce simmer for a few minutes, then thicken with 3 Tbsp cornstarch and some water, then added the chicken to reheat.


I added the cashews about two minutes before plating...served it up on some hot jasmine rice and garnished with scallions.


Thanks for looking!
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2012 at 04:20
@ Hoser,
 
Looks truly lovely, like Nuggets with orange and cashews  ... This is on my to try list ... when we get to Madrid next Monday ...
 
I like ease and simplicity ... and this is a simple, non time consuming laboral lunch or dinner ...
 
Thanks for posting.
 
I am enjoying Italia to its fullest ... the breads are sinful ... the fresh fish, divine and the pastas, well --- lucky I am petite and very active ...  
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2012 at 05:57
Waddago, Dave. Looks really good. I'm gonna try something like it, using thighs instead of breasts.
 
Only trouble with cashews, around here, is that they seem to disappear between the bag and the saucepan. Must be gremlins. Or sumpin. Confused
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2012 at 08:48
excellent, dave - i really like the simplicity and the look of this dish ~ definitely worth a try!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 05:28
I'm not familiar with this kind of coating, Dave. Do I understand it correctly that you first roll the meat in AP, egg and corn flour at the end? Normally we would use breadcrumbs at the end, but probably you're aiming for a particular result? Interesting thing to try out, they certainly look good. Now I'm so intrigued how that would work with polenta as the outside coat, after all it's also maïs (corn)?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 07:04
Just guessing, Chris, but I believe the polenta will result in a coarser, more crunchy sort of crust.
Cornstarch makes a smooth, thin coating. More of a seal than an actual crust. Corn starch as all or part of the coating is very common to Asian foods. Think tempora, for instance.
 
Ana Sortun does calimari with a cornmeal crust, and that's how it comes out. I don't mind that sort of coating on fish, chicken, etc. But it doesn't quite work, IMO, with the squid rings. So, when I make her squid rings with avocado hummus I use my usual squid breading instead.
 
What I'm saying is that polenta as the final crust layer would work with this recipe. It just won't have the same mouth feel. I wonder, too, if doing so wouldn't give the dish too much crunch factor. After all, that's what the cashews are for.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 07:15
Baby squid ( chipirones ) or Calamari ( Calamar ) here in Mediterranean are always dredged in all purpose or better yet, chick pea flour which prevents the infiltration of frying oils to enter into the product.
 
Well known Michelin star  chefs use chickpea flour, which is how I have learnt to do same. There is a huge difference ...
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 07:54
That's pretty much my approach, Margi. I dry off any excess moisture, but don't dry the rings fully. They get tossed in a mixture of chickpea flour, salt, pepper, and turmeric. Excess flour mixture is shaken off, and the squid gets popped into 350F oil for no more than 90 seconds.
 
Squid, octopus, and cuttlefish should all be cooked using the 2/20 rule. They should be cooked for less than two minutes, or more than 20. Anything in-between results in something tough and  rubbery.
 
But this is a far cry from the three-plate breading station that's being discussed. The only thing such stations have in common is the egg in the middle. The first and third bowls vary tremendously, with each variation having an effect on the final taste and texture of the fried product.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 02:02
Originally posted by ChrisBelgium ChrisBelgium wrote:

I'm not familiar with this kind of coating, Dave. Do I understand it correctly that you first roll the meat in AP, egg and corn flour at the end? Normally we would use breadcrumbs at the end, but probably you're aiming for a particular result? Interesting thing to try out, they certainly look good. Now I'm so intrigued how that would work with polenta as the outside coat, after all it's also maïs (corn)?

This is the first time I've used that particular breading method Chris...I believe it is an Asian inspired technique employing the cornstarch as the last dredge. I can only guess that this method was used because the chicken was returning to a sauce, and they wanted it to remain somewhat crisp. I was quite happy with the texture of the final product and will no doubt use this method again some time. 
Go ahead...play with your food!
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