Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > Hungary
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Paprik├ís Csirke
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Paprikás Csirke

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
Author
Message
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 February 2013 at 09:45
I was finally able to make this last month, and I think that it went very well:
 
 
I followed Rod's directions exactly, using the ingredients in the amounts specified etc.; chicken legs and thighs were the chosen medium for this treasure. Using careful patience and attention to Rod's details, I was rewarded with wonderful flavour, succulent, tender chicken, and perfect nokedli:
 
 
There were a couple-three execution problems that were my error alone, and were not the fault of the recipe or method. The main one was that, as I was trimming the chicken, most of skin sloughed off, and as a consequence the chicken did not get browned the way I would have preferred, plus it stuck to the pan as I tried to sear it, causing some sections to get ripped off. This was mostly a cosmetic problem, as you can see:
 
 
But the flavour was just fine, and I was very impressed with the way everything worked in beautiful harmony.
 
The other execution error that I may have made was that perhaps I should have let the whole dish rest, off the heat and covered, for a few minutes before serving. The reason I say this is because as I was plating the chicken pieces, they turned a dark, grayish-brown almost as soon as they hit the air. I've seen this happen with pork roasts, and have been told that it has to do with a lack of resting time. The flavour was great, but once again, it did cause a cosmetic flaw that was my error and not the fault of the recipe.
 
The nokedli turned out very well, also - following Rod's very, very easy formula of 1/2-cup of flour and 1/2 eggshell of water per egg, with a little salt and pepper, I was able to make six eggs' worth of wonderful Hungarian tradition that were a perfect compliment for this ancient meal:
 
 
You can learn more about the dumplings on the separate thread outlining Rod's procedure here:
 
 
The family also enjoyed the meal very much, and this dish will definitely be made again and often. The only thing close to a "complaint" that was mentioned was that the sauce seemed a little thin compared to what they were used to with my usual, similar dish, called paprika hendl:
 
 
However, it should be noted that, due to time constraints, I did not serve any bread with this meal, which would have been perfect for sopping up the savory, flavourful sauce. Personally, I liked it, and wouldn't really change it because the flavours are very much in balance. I suppose a person could reduce it somewhat, but I see no need, when one is trying to prepare a rustic, family-oriented peasant meal such as this. An option for a future preparation might be to use chunks of de-boned chicken and serve it more as a soup; or, perhaps I could drop the nokedli dough into the simmering sauce, so that the dumplings can soak up some excess liquid as they cook. But the truth is, the only thing that was really lacking was some good, crusty bread to sop up this beautiful sauce.
 
 
The only other "problem" is that, when I rendered the finely-diced chicken skin for fat, I put the beautiful, crunchy cracklin's (with a sprinkling of salt and pepper) on a paper-towel-lined saucer and set them aside, intending to use them as a garnish for the chicken and a topping for the nokedli, to add a little texture and flavour as well as visual appeal. Unfortunately, I made the mistake of offering a few of these savory, crispy-soft wonderful cracklin's to the Beautiful Mrs. Tas to sample, and she really liked them and kept asking for a few more. Then the kids found excuses to wander through the kitchen and try them too, and kept wandering through - so, by the time the meal was ready to serve, the cracklin's were gone. Next time, I'll hide them!
 
The bottom line is that if you're looking for some real, traditional Hungarian family eating, then this is definitely the dish for you - it really doesn't get any more "Hunky" than this! My thanks to Rod for sharing it, and my hearty and enthusiastic recommendation goes out to all: do give this a try!
 
Oh, and yes - Pride of Szeged really is all it's cracked up to be -
 
 
It worked beautifully for this dish, with the best flavour and colour that I've ever had in a paprika-based recipe. Short of actually having some little old Hungarian grandmother smuggling some of the "real stuff" in-country for me, I wouldn't use anything else.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Rod Franklin View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2010
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 921
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 February 2013 at 11:18
Well, there ya go. Looks good. Well done! I'll make a Hunky out of you yet!

All you needed to do different was add another ladle of juice to the plates and you would have had it. This stuff is soupy. It is not Paprika Hendel. It really should not be compared to it.

I wish I could find my camera. I would do a home style pictorial.

/Copywriting on
Home style Paprikas Csirke is just soup. But an awesome soup. A broth with the exotic combination of fine paprika in the foreground and of earthy bay leaves providing a roundness in the background. It's the essence of chicken with savory dumplings and sweet onions swimming in a rich, slightly salty, slightly sweet and creamy broth that has a hint of tang from sour cream. A soup whose integrity stays simple and balanced with no unnecessary flavors. There is nothing elusive about the flavors of this dish. With every spoon full, every essential flavor is right there on your tongue. It is square and plumb. In a word, consummate. Make it tonight. You want to. You need to.
/Copywriting off

Pride of Szeged is probably the best canned brand you're going to find on a shelf in America. Be aware that it does deteriorate with age. It will loose that bright red color and the flavor goes off. I know it's not proper, but I always open the can at the store and shake some out and look and smell and taste it before I buy it. Some stores might have some VERY old cans of it on their shelves. Be aware.
Hungry
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 February 2013 at 15:39
Hey, Rod - I'm glad that you gave this your seal of approval - I wanted to do it right and as close to your way as possible.
 
Originally posted by Rod Rod wrote:

Home style Paprikas Csirke is just soup. But an awesome soup. A broth with the exotic combination of fine paprika in the foreground and of earthy bay leaves providing a roundness in the background. It's the essence of chicken with savory dumplings and sweet onions swimming in a rich, slightly salty, slightly sweet and creamy broth that has a hint of tang from sour cream. A soup whose integrity stays simple and balanced with no unnecessary flavors. There is nothing elusive about the flavors of this dish. With every spoon full, every essential flavor is right there on your tongue. It is square and plumb. In a word, consummate. Make it tonight. You want to. You need to.
 
As I was reading this, I heard Morgan Freeman's voice!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.