Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Oceania and the Pacific Islands > Australia and New Zealand
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Pavlova
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Pavlova

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Effigy View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 17 June 2013
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 524
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Pavlova
    Posted: 17 August 2013 at 21:10
Pavlova

Forget duelling over Russell Crowe, Crowded House or Jane Campion, it’s the origins of the pavlova that really piques the interests of Aussie and Kiwis feuding over stolen cultural 'treasures'.

What is pavlova?

Pavlova (pronounced pav-low-vah) is made of a sweet meringue-like crust stuffed full of whipped cream and finished with fresh fruits such as kiwis, strawberries and other colourful berries. The dessert is overwhelmingly agreed to be an antipodean dish.

Why the dispute?

Australia and New Zealand have long been at battle over which country is ‘the best’, and any opportunity to claim an advantage is usually seized upon by eager patriots wanting to prove their nation’s superiority.

In the case of the pavlova, both countries claim to have invented this dessert. But proving ownership has proved difficult since it appears in history (and in cook books) at around the same time in both nations. So who invented it?

Anna Pavlova

Food historians agree that the dessert is named after Russian prima ballerina, Anna Matveyevna Pavlova (1881-1931), who toured both Australia and New Zealand in 1926 and Australia again in 1929. On her second visit to Australia, in 1929, Pavlova stayed at the Hotel Esplanade in Perth (an important detail we will come back to).

Recipe origins

But the dessert we know and love today can actually be traced back to 1926, when the cookbook Home Cookery for New Zealand included a recipe for "Meringue with Fruit Filling" (the name ‘pavlova’ is not used but the recipe is similar).

One year later, the sixth edition of Davis Dainty Dishes is published in New Zealand, which carried the first known recorded recipe using the named "Pavlova" but the recipe was for a gelatine based dish (not meringue).

Professor Helen Leach, a culinary anthropologist at the University of Otago in New Zealand, said the earliest recipe that uses both the correct recipe and the name ‘Pavlova’ was published in 1929 in a magazine titled New Zealand rural magazine.

In the same year, Mrs. McKay’s Practical Home Cookery, Chats and Recipes, also published in New Zealand, included a recipe for Pavlova Cakes. The ingredients were similar to those of today's Pavlova, but the mixture was baked into three dozen little meringues.

Professor Leach states in her book, The Pavlova Story: A Slice of New Zealand’s Culinary History, that the first Australian pavlova recipe was not published until 1935.

But what about Anna Pavlova's stay at the Hotel Esplanade, Perth in 1929? Yes, it is true that the Hotel invented a dessert in her honour, but that recipe was not invented until 1935. On April 2, 1935 Herbert (Bert) Sachse found a recipe for 'Meringue Cake' in the Women’s Mirror Magazine (contributed by a New Zealander) and sought to improve it. The resulting recipe he called ‘Pavlova’. The sweet became a much enjoyed offering at the Hotel Esplanade high teas and won the hotel and Chef Sechse national acclaim.

And the icing on the cake (or the kiwi fruit on the whipped cream) comes from Pavlova’s biography titled Anna Pavlova: Her Life and Art (published 1982). The biographer, Keith Money wrote that during Pavlova's tour of New Zealand in 1926, a chef at a hotel in Wellington, New Zealand invented a dessert for her. Money goes on to explain that the chef was inspired by Pavlova’s tutu which was draped in green silk roses. The dessert pavlova was intended to be a metaphorical representation – light and frothy with the soft meringue, cream and colourful fruit pieces representing the splendour of the dancer’s costume and ‘lighter than air’ form.

The verdict

Given the developments outlined above it seems faily conclusive that New Zealanders first developed the recipe for a meringue cake — sometimes called Pavlova. However it wasn't until Perth chef Bert Sachse developed his Pavlova recipe that the name and recipe become more widely known around the world. One thing we can all agree on is that the Pavlova has become an important part of the national cuisine of both countries.

Rosalind Scutt

http://travel.ninemsn.com.au/airnewzealand/8435774/who-owns-the-pavlova-new-zealand-or-australia

And my recipe...

  • 6 egg whites
  • 2 cups caster sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla essence
Beat the egg whites until they stand in stiff peaks


Add the sugar gradually, one tablespoon at a time, beating at high speed.
When all the sugar has been thoroughly incorporated and a stiff glossy meringue has formed, fold in the vinegar and vanilla essence.


Draw a circle on a sheet of parchment. (edit - I used a graphite pencil - graphite is safe as it is just carbon, to be safe, turn your parchment over.)


There is only one word for this next process...'Dollop'


Keep on dolloping until you have all the mix within the circle piled quite high - 8 to 10 cm.
Bake at a low temperature (150°C) for 45minutes then turn off the heat and leave for one hour.


Cool completely.

Pile whipped cream on to the Pavlova and decorate with fruit.

Strawberries, kiwifruit or passion friut pulp are the traditional ones, my boys like canned black doris plums.

Resident Peasant
Back to Top
gracoman View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice


Joined: 09 August 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 333
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 August 2013 at 21:56
Pavlova! 
What a wonderful post.  
Thank you Thumbs Up
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5414
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 August 2013 at 09:03
Anne,

Fanstastic penned historical and pictorial ... Needless to say, the dessert´s presentation is outstanding ...

Bravo,
Kind regards.
Margaux.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
jdonly1 View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 12 February 2010
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 179
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jdonly1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 August 2013 at 01:30
Yummo one of my favorite sweets

Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3041
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 August 2013 at 01:58
A great tutorial on a sexy classic dessert Anne...thanks so much!Clap
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
Addtotaste View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 18 May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Status: Offline
Points: 225
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Addtotaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 August 2013 at 04:25
Pavalova is one of my favourite desserts to serve after a spice heavy meal. Something light and fruity that is the perfect end.
Check out some more recipes and reviews - www.addtotaste.co.za
Back to Top
africanmeat View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 January 2012
Location: south africa
Status: Offline
Points: 897
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 August 2013 at 06:20
by just looking at this post I put 5 kg
Ahron
Back to Top
Effigy View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 17 June 2013
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 524
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 August 2013 at 02:42
Thanks for the nice comments Hug

The whipped cream is just that... no sugar or vanilla, just plain cream. There is enough sugar in the Pav. Fresh 'tart' tasting fruit works best.
Resident Peasant
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 6584
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 August 2013 at 12:27
Looks incredible, Anne - I've heard of it, but have never tried it!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.328 seconds.