Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Other Food-Related Topics > Canning, Freezing, Dehydrating and Other Food Preservation
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4155
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater
    Posted: 16 September 2016 at 09:10
Whether you shop in a supermarket, big box store, or farm market, right now the world is covered up with pumpkins and other winter squashes. So now is the time to think about putting some of that squash largess by.

There are a couple of things to consider, though. First and foremost, Jack O’lantern pumpkins are not the best choice. They tend to be stringy, and lack the sweetness of a cooking pumpkin.

Indeed, if you buy pumpkin puree in cans, and read the labels carefully, you’ll find that they are, more often than not, Hubbard squash, rather than pumpkin per se. They can do this because, horticulturally and legally, there is no such thing as a pumpkin.

On the other hand, if you want the seeds, Jack O’lanterns tend to be more seed heavy, and have larger ones to boot.

But, for canning, you want a culinary pumpkin. These are, most often, sold as “pie pumpkins. Even better, go with a different squash, such as Butternut, which will be less expensive. Keep in mind that almost all winter squashes can be used interchangeably in most recipes.

Next, keep in mind that squashes are the antitheses of acidic. So you’ll need a pressure canner. There is no way you can safely can pumpkin using a boiling water bath.

Something else to keep in mind: virtually every food safety organization recommends against home canning of pumpkin purees, mashes, butters, or products with similar consistency. The reason for this is that both the water content and density of such products is inconsistent, and you cannot guarantee proper heating all the way through, not even with a pressure canner. So the recommendation is that you preserve squash in chunks. Later on, you can mash or puree the preserved squash for the final dish.

Here’s the procedure, based on the instructions from the National Center for Home Food Preservation:

For a canner load of seven quarts, you’ll need about 16 pounds of pumpkin; or ten pounds for a load of pints. Note: In my experience, one quart of cubes with yield 1 ½ cups of mashed squash.

Wash the squash, remove seeds and the fibrous mass, cut into one-inch sliced, and peel. Cut the flesh into one-inch cubes. Boil two minutes in water. Fill the jars with the cubes and cooking liquid, leaving one-inch headspace.

Adjust lids and process at 10 psi, 55 minutes for pints, 90 minutes for quarts.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7981
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2016 at 11:50
Hi, Brook, and thanks for this valuable information. This is good to know, as pumpkin is a mainstay in my German-from-Russia (actually, Ukraine) heritage.

I don't know if my dad had any pumpkins come up this year, but will check with him. If not, I will be hitting a farmer's market tomorrow in Great Falls, and will try to pick some up in order to give this a try with my brand-spanking-new, as-yet unused pressure canner.

Question regarding this:

>>>Boil two minutes in water.<<<

Would the level of the water be just enough to cover the pumpkins, or more? Would one start with cold water, and then start the timer at a 'full boil?" I am guessing that the answer to both questions is "yes," but would like to confirm.

Many thanks - yet again - for this contribution -

Ron

If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4155
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2016 at 15:48
Good questions, Ron.

I usually cover the squash by a few inches of water, in order to assure there's enough to fill the jars. Because of the cubes, there's a lot of space between, so the jars take more liquid than usual.

The instructions, now that you bring it up, are ambiguous. I actually bring the water to a boil, add the squash, then start the timer after it returns to a boil.

Keep in mind that 90 minutes at 240F is more than sufficient to cook the squash.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7981
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2016 at 16:04
Gotcha - thanks for the clarification - it makes good sense!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Chef
Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 965
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2016 at 18:17
On a side note: "Even better, go with a different squash, such as Butternut, which will be less expensive."
That's what my mom uses for pie, and everyone says they like it better than pumpkin.

Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4155
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2016 at 20:22
I can see that, Melissa. Butternut is inherently sweeter than most pumpkins, with greater depth of flavor. Basically, it more pumpkiny than actual pumpkins.

In the Northeast, the pumpkin of choice for commercial bakers is Long Island Cheese; certainly among the top half dozen when it comes to culinary pumpkins. The "cheese" types are named that because of their resemblance to old-fashioned cheese boxes.

Other top-ranked culinary pumpkins would include Boer White, and Kentucky Flat Tan Field.

Those smallish so-called pie pumpkins certainly are good in terms of flavor and texture. But given their size, and the amount of wastage, they're far too expensive IMO.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7981
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 September 2016 at 08:43
In Great Falls this weekend, it was 78¢ per pound. I should have gotten some for canning, but The Beautiful Mrs. Tas was already quite apoplectic at the spending we did at the farmer's market.

We met some very interesting folks and got some wonderful stuff at very good value; however, we bought way too much of it!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.