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Pollo a la Brassa (Peruvian Roasted Chicken)

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gracoman View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 March 2018 at 11:33
Pollo a la Brassa (Peruvian Roasted Chicken)


This dish was all the rage a few years ago.  It may still be but I haven't seen a lot of discussion about it anywhere for several years.  No matter.  It's still just as good as it was when it was (or still is) the new guy on the block.

The marinated chicken is usually roasted on a rotisserie over live fire.
I don't have a rotisserie so I spatchcocked a couple instead

We're going to need a few imported ingredients to make the marinade and Aje Verde (Peruvian Green Dipping Sauce)Panca hot Pepper Paste, Amarillo Hot Pepper Paste and Huacatay Paste(PeruvianBlack Mint).  Finding these ingredients fresh in my neck of the woods is not easy so paste it was.  My favorite of these is the Panca.  A red pepper paste that is not overly hot but complex and delicious.  The Amarillo or yellow pepper paste is also very tasty and seems to be in everything Peruvian.  The Black mint is a bit odd on it's own but makes a grans addition to many Peruvian and Bolivian recipes.


Finished marinade in the food processor.
Dark beer, extra virgin olive oil, vinegar, huacatay paste (Peruvian black mint paste), aji panca paste (Peruvian hot panca pepper paste), ground cumin, ground annatto, dried oregano, dried rosemary, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper
 


Aji Verde (Peruvian dipping sauce) ingredients in the food processor.
Fresh jalapeƱos, including seeds and ribs, Aji Amarillo paste, huacatay paste, freshly picked cilantro leaves,
grated Cotija cheese, garlic, vegetable oil, white vinegar, lime juice, mayonnaise, salt and pepper            
 


This didn't work well so I transferred the sauce to finish in my Vita-Prep 3. 



A bad pic of two 8 hr marinated spatchcocked chickens on my smoker/grill. 
Either I was also marinated, and I'm pretty sure I was, or I smudged the lens on my phone camera after playing with a couple of spatchcocked chickens. 
 


Pollo a la Brassa is traditionally served with aji verde, fries and a salad so that's what I did.  No salad pic.
 


Despite the marinade, this Peruvian dish is all about the Aji Verde.  The dipping sauce is crazy good stuff.
 
 

The recipes I used for the chicken and aji verde sauce are an almagam of the recipes below.

http://www.allisonmdickson.com/2010/08/making-peruvian-style-rotisserie.html?m=1

https://www.daringgourmet.com/pollo-la-brasa-peruvian-roasted-chicken/

https://www.daringgourmet.com/peruvian-aji-verde-sauce/

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/08/peruvian-style-grilled-chicken-with-green-sauce-recipe.html

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Hoser View Drop Down
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Joined: 06 February 2010
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2018 at 02:14
Wow! Absolutely beautiful stuff there Gman.....food porn at it's best ClapClapClap
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2018 at 08:35
Very good job, G - I am impressed, and that Aji Verde looks wonderful! It looks to me that grilling versus rotisserie worked well.

Were the Inca's products available online, or were you able to get them at a nearvy shop? That photo makes me a bit homesick - It's been a long time since I've seen that view. My mother was born and raised in south and west of there, and we used to travel that corridor often.
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gracoman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2018 at 09:14
Thanks Hoser.  Sometimes I get lucky.

Ron, I called every Hispanic market in my area looking for the ingredients but came up short.  I wanted to use fresh or frozen chili's but none were to be had.  Several sites sell the pastes including WalMart's.  I ordered the pastes from Amazon since they had the Inca brand and 2 day shipping. Other places are less expensive but only by a dollar or two.  They are all supposed to freeze well so when I'm done with them (for now) I'll freeze whatever leftovers I have, if any, in ice cube trays in premeasured amounts and vac pack them. 

Some additional information on this dish:

Developed in 1950, Pollo a la Brassa is not an old recipe.  It is the invention of a Swiss native with hotel experience.  After WWII, Roger Schuler eventually made his way to Peru where he started a chicken farm outside Lima and promptly went bankrupt.  Mr Schuler started selling bbq'd chickens from a roadside stand where he and partner Franz Ulrich developed the now ubiquitous (to Peruvian pollerias) 6 spit rotisserie as a means of cooking more birds faster. 

The chicken was a hit and the two opened the famous polleria La Granja Azul in Lima.  The rotisserie chicken had none of the ingredients I used.  It was not marinated, only salted.  Peruvian chickens are different than American chicken as they were raised on fish meal instead of grain as they are in the US.  They simply taste better. 

Today, each of Lima's pollerias use their own secret blend of a few ingredients .  The version found in the Andes, however, is loaded with seasonings.
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