Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > The Iberian Peninsula
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Pollo en Salsa Almendra con Canela
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Pollo en Salsa Almendra con Canela

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Pollo en Salsa Almendra con Canela
    Posted: 06 April 2012 at 11:18
According to Wikipedia, Al-Ándalus was (and remains) a very rich area, with exotic history, culture and cuisine inspired by the people who have occupied the region and left deep, indelible influences:
 
 
Quote Al-Andalus (Arabic: الأندلس‎,  Spanish: Al-Ándalus; Portuguese: Al-Andalus; Catalan: Al-Àndalus), also known as Moorish Iberia, was a medieval Muslim state and territorial region occupying parts of what is today Spain and Portugal, and small parts of modern France; its precise extent varied over time. The name more generally describes parts of the Iberian Peninsula and Septimania governed by Muslims (given the generic name of Moors), at various times in the period between 711 and 1492, although the territorial boundaries underwent constant changes due to wars with the Christian Kingdoms.
 
Over time, the Moorish province of Al-Ándalus was whittled down through war and weakened administration until it was a shadow of its former size:
 
 
Finally, an important marriage changed the history of the Iberian Peninsula forever:
 
Quote In 1469 the marriage of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile signaled the launching of the final assault on the Emirate of Granada (Gharnatah). The King and Queen convinced the Pope to declare their war a crusade. The Christians crushed one center of resistance after another and finally, in January 1492, after a long siege, the Moorish sultan, Muhammad XII, surrendered the fortress palace, the renowned Alhambra, itself.
 
Islam was gone; the Moors had been conquered - but their influences remained, to be found in the language, art, literature and music of the region.  Jose Ortega y Gasset, a Spanish philosopher, contemplated this unique cultural exchange in his Teoría de Andalucía:
 
Quote Andalusia, which has never shown the swagger nor petulancy of particularism; that has never pretended to the status of a State apart, is, of all the Spanish regions, the one that possesses a culture most radically its own.... One paints Andalusia: a roof-terrace, some flowerpots, blue sky. One reads southern authors.... The thief from the Sierra Morena and the smuggler are national heroes. All Spain feels its existence justified by the honor of having on its flanks the Andalusian piece of the planet.
 
Probably the most important important Moorish influece can be found in the Andalusian cusine, with its warm, exotic spices, citrus highlights and accompaniments of rice and nuts - with a consipcuous lack of pork or wine in the recipes and a close affinity with modern, north-African cusine. FoodReference.com provides some perpsective on these and other influences:
 
Quote The legacy of Phoenicians, Carthaginians and, to an extent, Jews, is evident in the food of Andalusia, but overshadowing everything is the heritage of the Moors, of majados (pound or pulverised ingredients), fried food and bittersweet flavours. Phoenicians left behind saffron, one of Spain's signature spices; Carthaginians brought the chickpea from north Africa, Romans installed irrigation systems, encouraged fishing and cultivated olive trees, but during their 700 year rule the Moors contributed a multitude of ingredients – figs, pomegranates, spinach, aubergine (eggplant), rice, and almonds. They developed a culinary repertoire using preparation techniques and spices unknown in the rest of Europe.
 
This Andalusian dish is truly a reflection of those unique origins, and my sincere appreciation is offered to our own Margaux for her gracious assistance in bringing its background and ambient traits into focus:
 
Quote This is an ancient dish of Andalusian-Moorish origin. It was first documented in the Hispanic-Moorish Culinary Documents in Andalausia in the 13th century under the name, Gallina en Pepitoria.... Then in 1599, under Roman Catholic rule, Don Diego Granado re-documented the cuisines of Andalusia, when it was mentioned once again. During the Spanish Golden Era, the time of great Banquets, in 1611, Don Martínez Montiño re-instated this dish. The original (Moorish) recipe is prepared slow cooking on a stove top, or in a Tajine (Berber: Tagine ); it is very aromatic and the sauce is heavenly; quite an elegant dish, aromatic and full of exotic spice yet not piquant.
 
Margi also provided the historical recipe, which was referenced between 1611 and 1745 (After the expulsion of the Moors) and looks absolutely wonderful:
 
Quote Pollo en Salsa Almendra con Canela
Chicken in Almond Sauce with Cinammon
 
3 fl. oz. Olive Oil
12 almonds
1 thick slice of day old bread
2 garlic cloves
3 pounds of chicken pieces of choice
1 pinch cinammon
1 pinch ground clove
1 tsp. Sweet Smoked Paprika
22 fl. oz. (2.75 cups) of hot water (or chicken broth/stock) 
Salt and black pepper
1 medium onion
1 tsp. Lemon Juice
a few Saffron Threads
1 pinch of cumin seeds
 
1. Heat oil in large Dutch Oven type vessel
2. Sauté the bread, garlic and almonds
3. Set aside
4. Sauté the chicken pieces in same oil, then remove and set aside 
5. Sauté the onion until tender and return chicken parts to pot
6. Cover with water and add the lemon juice
7. Add salt, cinammon and cloves
8. Cover and cook over slow, low flame for 1 hour, or until chicken pieces are golden and tender
9. Crush the saffron, cumin seed, fried bread and almonds in a mortar with a pestle
10. When the chicken is almost ready, add this mixture
11. The sauce should be quite thick, so do not raise the flame - it breaks up the sauce
12. Serve with oven-warm bread or pitas, long-grain rice and a glass of red wine.
 
This recipe has inspired me in a way that is unique to historical Spanish cuisine, and I have moved it up to the top of my to-do list. Margi and I have been discussing some methods of preparation, and it looks like we might have a good plan that is in keeping with the historical tradition while also maximising the unique and exotic flavours. Here are some interesting issues that came up in the discussion:
 
Nomenclature: Should this dish (properly and historically) be called Gallina en Pepitoria, or Pollo en Salsa Almendra con Canela? From what I can see, it looks like the former refers more to the ancient, strictly Moorish dish, while the latter name comes later, and was used in the 17th Century. Since the recipe that I have dates from that time period, it looks like Pollo en Salsa Almendra con Canela is the way to go; however with only a few very minor differences, (see below), the older name can apply just as easily.
 
Marinating and Wine: Much of my reading states that versions of this recipe begin by marinating the chicken pieces in white wine overnight; however, the Moors, due to the prohibitions of Islam, did not use wine. So, a person could use some lemon juice instead, with oil and possibly the spices used in the dish; or, a person could say, "We are not Moors!" and use the wine in preparation, either by itself or with the lemon juice, oil and spices. On Margi's suggestion, I think i will create a spice rub of all the condiments in the recipe, then rub the chicken pieces with EVOO and then dredge in the spice rub. Then, I will prepare the marinade from the lemon juice and a bit of white wine. 3 or 4 hours should be plenty of time for a marinade of this type. Since the recipe above is subsequent to the Moorish period, this seems to be a good idea, and the wine shouldn't be a problem.
 
Tajine or Dutch Oven: As above, If I were going whole-hog into the Moorish prepartion, I do believe that this would be the first dish cooked in my new tajine; however, keeping with the 17th-century themes as I have been, I think that the Dutch oven (probably my Tramontina) will be just fine.
 
Working through the issues above, my conclusions (subject to correction by those who know more about this than I do) are that the recipe above can be used for both the ancient, Moorish preparation (Gallina en Pepitoria), with no wine used, and prepared in a tajine using more basic techniques; while the slightly-more-contemporary, 17th Century prepation (Pollo en Salsa Almendra con Canela) can be achieved by using a wine marinade, more refined techniques and cast-iron cookware. For my first preparation, I will be following the 17th-century methodology, since it is a little more familiar to me, but notes on the more ancient, Moorish techniques for cooking this can be found below, in order to give the reader a choice in how s/he wants to prepare this delicious Andalusian recipe.
 
John's Arroz Andaluz looks to be a perfect accompaniment for this dish, so I will use that recipe and document the process as well. I am considering a few Moorish highlights added in a modest fashion; possible ideas: a little bit of sliced almond, a hint of cinnamon or perhaps something else - maybe orange zest or some milk - something that will underscore the Moorish traditions of that recipe, and remain true also to the later Andalusian characteristics.
 
Finally, I am thinking that gazpacho would make a perfect first course for this meal, as well; for those interested, here are two links:
 
 
 
NOTE - for those who are interested in a wholly-modern and contemporary preparation of this dish, please consult the thread titled Pollo a la Canela:
 
 
For a really nice-looking contemporary recipe, please see the thread titled Gallina en Pepitoria:
 
 
To get really, really close to the Moorish ancestry of this dish, Take a look at Chicken Kdras, from North Africa:
 
 
And for a Pureto Rican descendant of these dishes with Caribbean influences, Take a look at this:
 
 
Thoughts, comments and ideas on this are welcome and would be appreciated - I hope to take my latest trip to the Iberian Peninsula either this weekend or next! Tongue 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6287
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 12:26
 
 
Tas,
 
I see an exemplary researcher and journalist too ... Great introduction ... Yes, it certainly was a very strategic period in Andalusia ...
 
Recently, I had seen the newest  film, on topic, ISABEL ... Fablous portrayal starring a young tv and film actress Michelle Jennèr from Barcelona. I cannot wait to see the dish photographed and to hear all about it ...
 
I believe it is going to be delicious with the rice pairing ... the white wine marinade with a little lemon juice and the spice rub with Evoo --- I am going to try this in Madrid ...
 
Keep me posted.
Kind regards. Happy Holidays ... Margi.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 13:16
Margi sent a gorgeous picture of one version of this dish, which i have formatted, uploaded and posted here ~
 
 
Margi, please feel free to add coments as you prefer, and thank you!
 
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6287
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 13:21
Tas,
 
Thanks. As you know this photo came from an old book I have here in Gargano, on Historical Spanish dishes ... The Vet scanned it for you and the problem is, that we cannot see that divine sauce so clearly ... This is NOT your fault ... this is not an original photo of our´s ... I wanted to give you an idea, on the look of the dish ...
 
So, IMAGINE, a thick reddish golden sauce with exotic aromas ...
 
Until Sunday.
Margi.  
 
Margi.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 13:39
A thought just occurrred to me with the spice rub we were talking about above: is it possible that rubbing the chicken with the spices and then sautéing the pieces might scorch the spices?
 
If anyone has a ready answer to this, please let me know If scorching is indeed likely, then I might come up with an alternative plan. If not, then I will stay with this, as I think it will really get the flavours into the chicken and be delicious ~ 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 14:25
Looking this over I'm put in mind of the Moroccan kdra, which is a special form of tajine. The specifics of what make a kdra different are irelevent, now. But the similarities would indicate, to me, that they are decended from the Moorish methodology.
 
If that is indeed the case, and you want to go with the original, then neither marinating nor browning is required.
 
The procedure would be to put the oil and spices in your Dutch oven. Add the chicken and cook it, without browning, covered for a few minutes. Add a few of the onions (maybe 25%) and stock, and simmer over low heat about 30 minutes. Add the rest of the onions, and continue cooking about another 30 minutes until chicken is very tender. Transfer the chicken to a serving platter and add the almond-bread-garlic mixture to the pan. Cook until sauce is thickened. At that point sprinkle with a bit of lemon juice to cut the richness of the sauce and serve.
 
Note that the chicken is not browned first, which is typical of tajine cookery. If you want to make this in your new tajine, watch the liquid level. What I would do is just add enough liquid to barely cover the chicken. Then proceed the same way.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 14:31
brook, thank you for the wealth of information in your post; I am guessing that the method you are referring to must indeed take it all the way back to the moorish origins. any other thoughts on this aspect are indeed welcome ~
 
i am truly enjoying the collaboration, exchange of ideas and brain-storming here ~ thanks to such contributions, people who prepare this are really able to explore the past and travel far!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 14:35
 is it possible that rubbing the chicken with the spices and then sautéing the pieces might scorch the spices?
 
More than possible, Ron. It's quite likely if you're going to saute the chicken. Note that in both Margi's recipe and my kdra method that the spices are added after the fact. 
 
The whole secret of these dishes is the rich, flavorful sauce that is produced. The chicken is merely a blank canvas that supports those flavors.  
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 14:40
In that case, it might be better for anyone wanting to go with a marinade to add only "scorch-safe" ingredients for it (perhaps oil, wine (unless going with Moorish preparation), salt, pepper and maybe garlic), and reserve the scorch-prone spices for a later step in the preparation.
 
Thoughts? 
 
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 14:40
Ron, one thing to keep in mind with this dish is that the sauce, as Margi points out, has a rich redness to it. That comes from the cinnamon.
 
Most tajines and kdras do not include that ingredient. The result is often an anemic yellow color. To intensify it, Moroccan housewives often add more saffron, towards the end. Personally, I like the idea of a pinch of cinnamon for both flavor and color. Keep that in mind as you explore tagine cookery downstream.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 14:59
In that case, it might be better for anyone wanting to go with a marinade to.....
 
Ron, why are you so locked-in to marinating and sauteeing?
 
Granted, they are an integral part of Western cooking. But that's not what we're doing here. This is, essentially, an Arabic dish, which got modified in the 17th century to make it more acceptible to palace paletes. But even the more recent versions from the 17th century do not marinate nor saute.
 
When you get into versions adapted to current cooking standards you start to see marinating and sauteeing added in---not because they're historically correct, but, because, everybody knows those things inprove flavor. Well, maybe they do. But we're talking about a particular approach to cookery. Adapting it too far, and you wind up with a different dish altogether.
 
It's like the brining thing. If you only read modern recipes you'd get the idea that chicken, turkey, and pork must be brined; that if you cook it without brining you're in for some terrible meals. Well, I'll share a secret with you: My mama never heard of brining. But we ate pretty good.
 
Normally I wouldn't make a big deal of this, either way. But here we have a dish that represents two historical/cultural evolutions, with clear directions for both the original version, and it's "upgraded" form.  Why dilute either one with techniques better suited to other dishes?
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2012 at 19:19
brook, my line of thought comes from two directions:
 
1) not as important, but many of the recipes in my reasearch mention marinating in wine over-night, but, they are of course modern.
 
2) more importantly, my thinking is that, in the 1600s, the general quality of meat was inconsistent, at best. seasoning with salt and spices, and marinating in wine was, i thought, a way to hold off spoilage and also, in some cases, to disguise the taste of "less-than-fresh" meats.
 
those are my reasonings, but i'm definitely not married to the idea of marinating in wine for a few hours. i was thinking that one would, correctly, forego marination altogether, as you mention, for the moorish or more ancient method. in later times, based on my reasoning above, i figured marination may or may not be used, and in modern preparations, it would be used as a matter of course.
 
but as i said, i'm very flexible here; my main goal is to stick to the concepts of the "middle" period as described in the opening post. based on your research with foods and preparation of those times, your best guess is good enough for me.
 
thoughts, in light of my comments above, would be appreciated! Embarrassed 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6287
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 03:04
@ Tas and Historic Foodie,
 
Buongiorno,
 
It is 11am and quite a bittery cold grey day here in Gargano.
 
I have had the oppty to read this post over late last night ... I have to say, that I prefer the Dutch Oven Stove Top method of preparation for this historical dish and in order to prepare the sauce properly ...
 
Furthermore, I would marinate the chicken, without the spice rub, as Brook has coached.
 
I too, enjoy the Discussion part of the threads, more than just typing recipes and glossaries ... For this, I thank Tas on this.
 
Now, starters ... Personally, tomato based Gazpacho is a bit acidic considering the ingredients of the main course ... Rice as side ...
 
I think either a Andalusian Salad ( no tomato = 1515 - 1520 ) or Ajo Blanco Con Uvas, a White Garlic Gazpacho with Almonds and White Grapes would be much better as a pair with this dish.
 
I am going to post the Andalusian Salad which is a historical Moorish Hispanic Salad that is eaten to this day with Oranges and Curly Lettuce amongst other items as a separate post and the White Gazpacho, which is also steeped in Moorish history in Andalusia and thus, both are documented.
 
If keeping with the main theme, I would prepare the recipe ( the star chicken ) as recipe states with Brook´s  coached method of the Dutch Oven procedures outlined in one of his replies.
 
The recipe calls for Saffron threads which is a must for this recipe or grounded --- this is what does plus the smoked paprika sweet gives the deep reddish golden color to the dish and of course the source.  
 
Kindest.
Margi.  
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 06:42
mention marinating in wine over-night, but, they are of course modern.
 
Precisely my point, Ron. So the question is, are you interested in modern adaptations of ancient dishes? Or do you want the true gelt? This is a case where you cannot have both.  
 
in some cases, to disguise the taste of "less-than-fresh" meats.
 
Don't go too heavily in this direction, as it represents circular reasoning on the part of modern interpreters rather than documentable fact.
 
In the Western world spices were used primarily as a representation of conspicuous consumption. They represented wealth, and were used most lavishly when there were guests, to show how much you valued them. Over time they were used more and more to compliment the food, rather than overpower it, as was the case in the East.
 
Until the late 19th/early 20th centuries people preferred stronger tasting meat anyway. The British still do. You've no doubt heard, for instance, of the practice of hanging gamebirds until they're blue? This is an intentional process of creating meat on the high side. Most Americans would consider such meat to be spoiled.
 
When the blue birds are cooks, spices are still used, but it's not to cover up the taste of spoiled meat.
 
In 1633 the Mass. Bay Colony administers posted rules for the use of the marketplace that eventually became Boston's Haymarket Square. Among those rules: "No blown, stale, or spoilt meat may be offered for sale."
 
You can make all the necessary inferences from that. I shouldn't have to spell them out.
 
Sorry for the lecture. But this is a sore point with me. As it is with most food historians.
 
 
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 07:06
but as i said, i'm very flexible here; my main goal is to stick to the concepts of the "middle" period as described in the opening post. based on your research with foods and preparation of those times, your best guess is good enough for me.
 
Ron, you remember our conversation re: the use of cream of X soups as a replacement for making a sauce?
 
My best guess is that we're looking at a similar syndrome here. The middle-period recipe you're using is a modern adaptation from a company whose sole purpose is to sell its line of spices. Doesn't make the recipe bad. But doesn't make it historically correct, either.
 
I would say it represents the further evolution of the dish, from Moorish, to post renaissance Spanish, to modern. Certainly the idea of dusting with flour and browning is more modern, dating from the 19th century.
 
Were it me, I would first make this using Margi's original recipe, following the guidelines I laid out. Then, the second time, I would use either an adaptation of the Avion recipe, or research an actual middle-period one. The essential difference, of course, being the use of wine. Finally, I'd make it following the Avion instructions.
 
This would do two things. 1. It would assure I knew what the original, Moorish version tasted like, and how to make it; and, 2. it would let me make a choice as to which version I wanted to incorporate into my repatory.
 
If it turns out you like the Avion version best; or a combination of it and marinating the chicken, that's fine. But at least you'd know how your final recipe differs in taste and texture from the original.
Back to Top
ChrisFlanders View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 01 March 2012
Location: Flanders
Status: Offline
Points: 343
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 07:42

Quote This is an ancient dish of Andalusian-Moorish origin. It was first documented in the Hispanic-Moorish Culinary Documents in Andalausia in the 13th century under the name, Gallina en Pepitoria

"Gallina en pepitoria" means hen cut in pieces, cooked in a sauce. "(En) pepitoria" is a frequently used spanish expression that we know better as... (a) fricassée. Pepitoria refers to the meat, cut in pieces. It is also used with rabbit; "conejo en pepitoria" and even other meat, mostly game birds. One thing you will always find in "en pepitoria" dishes is... hardboiled eggyolks, almonds are not even a necessity but are a very common addition.

The name "Gallina en pepitoria" is still very much popular and in use nowadays and "pollo con salsa de almendras" is probably a synonyme.

Here's a contemporay preparation for Gallina en Pepitoria:
 
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 08:29
Good to hear another voice in this discussion, Chris. Thanks for posting.
 
I especially appreciate your comments on the use of Sherry in lieu of white wine. It certainly makes sense for the post renaissance versions.
 
I could be wrong (wouldn't be the first time), but my impression is that the use of mashed hard boiled eggs is a more modern way of binding and thickening a sauce. In the original, the bread would have served that function.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6287
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 08:47
@ Historic Foodie.
 
Please note: There are two posts that Tas has made within the last 3 days.
 
One is: a Moorish Hispanic ancient recipe with almonds, lemon, saffron and smoked paprika ...
 
And there is one, alot more contemporary,  called Pollo en Canela on a separate post which he had found online.
 
Happy Holidays.
Margaux.
 
 
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 09:47
hey, guys - great discussion so far - i'm headed out for a few hours but will be back to offer thoughts and ideas, but wanted to post this before i left. brook, i think we're on the same line of thought, or at least very close, because what you say makes perfect sense - there might have been a communication error somewhere though. the el avion recipe isn't on my radar at all, i'm fosusing on margi's 1611 recipe first, and then probably the moorish methodology next, as it looks like a great preparation as well. the wine marinating was something that i "thought" was common for that "rennaisance? baroque? lol - i only know periods in music terms!), but if not, based on your research, i'm open to correction.
 
more later - thanks to all for a great discussion!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4925
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2012 at 11:44
Sorry for the confusion, Ron. I was mentally combining the two threads; this one and the first of them you posted for Pollo a la Canela, which then gives us a complete continuum from the Moorish to yesterday. Chris' contribution shows a modern version going even one step further.
 
My expertise is the North American colonization period. So I get hazy about the names of historic periods. But the names used in music tend to parallel those used in history. That being the case, we're probably talking baroque, in general. In England we'd be looking at the Reformation. Anyway, let's call it baroque, which is a lot less awkward that post-Rennaisance or any of the other phrases we've been struggling with.
 
So, if I understand correctly, it's the baroque version that most interests you. No sweat. What I would do is follow Margi's posted recipe. I would not marinate the chicken, because that's not appropriate. Step 4 in Margi's instructions is the only ambiguous part. She is saying to saute, which would infer browning. But if we look on this as an evoluton from the Moorish kdra type dishes, then it would be only cooked for a few moments, to take on the fried spice flavors.
 
I can't speak for Spanish foodways of the baroque period. But with English dishes of a similar nature, pre-browning is very rare. So, given that, and the Moorish antecedents, I would not brown the chicken.
 
Other than that, Margi's instructions and those for making a kdra are close enough to make no never mind. Some minor differences in when ingredients get added, is all. And note, please, that despite being 150-200 years later in time, hers does not contain wine---which I found particularly interesting.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.125 seconds.