Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > The Iberian Peninsula
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - portuguese bean soup
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

portuguese bean soup

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: portuguese bean soup
    Posted: 03 February 2010 at 17:14
this stuff gets better the older it is; but, it never seems to last long. also seems like i am always making this soup around new years day, probably because of the ham we have on christmas? it tastes great and i like it a lot. always enjoy having leftovers for lunch the next week.

there are probably many varieties of this, but here's mine. as always, this will make a bunch for a crowd of hungry boys with leftovers for lunches - cut it in half if you're not feeding teenage boys. the recipe SEEMS to call for a LOT of liquid, but by the time the rice and beans soak it up, you may actually need to add some.
  • 1 lb great northern beans
  • 8 cups of water
  • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, crushed and minced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • salt and black pepper to taste (or 15-20 peppercorns)
  • 1 ham bone (and juices from cooking) with plenty of meat left on it, or some smoked hocks, chopped or diced sausage etc.
  • 2 quarts chicken broth or water
  • 1 lb carrots, diced
  • 2-3 cups rice, depending on how thin or thick you like your soup
  • fresh or dried herbs of choice, to taste (some suggestions are thyme, marjoram, rosemary and/or basil)
day one: rinse, sort and soak beans 12-24 hours in a pot of water

day two: drain and rinse beans, place in large dutch oven or stock pot with 16 cups water, broth, olive oil, butter, onion, bay leaves, seasonings and herbs, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 1-2 hours.

add ham bone or hocks. bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer two hours (if you used a boneless ham, skip down to the bottom paragraph).

remove meat and allow to cool, remove meat from bone, cut up and return to pot.

add carrots and rice, also add sausage if using. add water if necessary. return to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer at least 30 minutes, or until beans, carrots and rice are soft.
 
serve with hot, crusty buttered bread.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2010 at 09:19
it should be noted that the original recipe we had for this included cubed potatoes rather than carrots. over time, we stopped adding them due to the double-dose of starch (rice and potatoes) and that the potatoes seemed bland along with the starch. carrots add a lot of flavour to the party and, in my opinion, are true to the ingredients that would be found on the iberian peninsula.
 
here is the original recipe as we received it from cb900f of www.baitshopboyz.com
  • 1/2 pound (1.5 cups) navy beans or great northern beans.  Soak them overnight.
  • 4 cups water.
  • 2 tbsp olive oil.
  • 1/2 med onion, finely chopped.
  • 1 tooth of garlic, crushed.
  • 1 bay leaf.
  • 1 tsp salt.
  • Black pepper to taste, or 10 peppercorns.
  • 1 hambone with enough left on to make 2 to 3 cups of meat.
  • 2 large potatoes, peeled & cubed.
  • 1/2 cup rice.

1.  Day one:  Soak beans 12 to 24 hours in 6 cups water.

2.  Day two:  Drain beans, place in 5 qt. Dutch oven with 4 cups water, oil, onion, garlic, bay leaf, salt & pepper.  Bring to boil, reduce heat & simmer AT LEAST 4 hours.

3.  Add ham bone.  Bring to boil, reduce heat & simmer an additonal 1 to 2 hours.

4.  Remove ham bone & cool.  Remove ham from bone, cut up & return to pot.

5. Add potatoes, simmer 10 minutes.

6.  Add rice, bring to boil.  Reduce heat & simmer 15 minutes more.

If you use boned ham, skip steps 3 & 4.  Cook soup at least 6 hous & add meat at same time as potatoes.

If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 October 2011 at 17:02
ok, here we go ~ easy stuff that is good for any time of year, but seems best of all during the winter.
 
i started out by soaking a pound of beans over-night. these are small white beans rather than the ones in the recipe, but no worries:
 
 
the next day, i put the ham bone in with the beans, the liquids, the chopped onion, the garlic, the bay leaves, the herbs, the salt and the pepper. i brought this to a boil and then let it simmer for four hours:
 
 
the idea is to let the flavours marry while the simmering gets the ham ready to come off the bone easily.
 
when the time had passed, i removed the ham bone and began removing the meat:
 
 
you want to dice it into bite-sized chunks, where possible. it didn't seem like enough, so i grabbed a little extra help:
 
 
and diced about half of that ham up as well:
 
 
i added all the ham to the soup, and then also added the carrots:
 
 
and the rice (brown rice, in this case):
 
 
and simmered everything until the carrots were tender and the rice was finished. as the rice absorbed the water, the soup thickened up pretty well, and and it wasn't long before it was done.
 
we served the soup with some toasted, buttered bread:
 
 
and enjoyed a nice, hot, satisfying meal.
 
as you can see, this one has a lot of good things going for it - it looks terrific:
 
 
and tastes even better than that. all of the flavours here work together to really satisfy and provide a wonderful meal:
 
 
the best part is that there we always make more than we need, so there are plenty of leftovers for lunch during the next week.
 
easy to make and highly recommend, portuguese bean soup is one that you will definitely enjoy, if you give it a try.
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 381
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 October 2011 at 18:11
You might also try using parsnips instead of all or half of the carrots.  Roasting your root vegetables (just coat them with olive oil, spread them on a baking sheet, stick 'em in a 350-degree oven, and stir them a couple of times while they caramalize) will likely add a lot of flavor depth as well.  If you do that, then you'll want to add the root vegetables to the main pot later in the cooking, so that they don't disintegrate into mush.  Don't forget to deglaze your roasting pan and add all of that browned goodness to the pot!

Cooking individual components of such peasant dishes with the optimal technique to maximize the flavor of each component before bringing them all together into the classic combination (perhaps in a carefully composed plating instead of a cruder presentation) is a typical approach that chefs will now frequently use to bring much more flavor and refinement to humble dishes -- another case in which a little more technique, time, and care can pay off handsomely.  
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 October 2011 at 19:23

Those are some great ideas, Daikon. The pre-roasting of the vegetables and de-glazing of the roasting pan must really knock the flavour out of the park. I tried something similar with a spanish guiso once, but didn't carry it far enough. I haven't done much with parsnips, but have tried them with a couple of recipes and I really like the sweet and unique flavour they have. I'll make it a goal to use them more often.

 
I'd be interested in your ideas where plating is concerned as this is one area where I could really use some improvement. Generally, because I have several kids snapping at my heels who want to eat NOW, my plated pictures usually look pretty rushed, plain and uninspiring; I am sure I could do better while keeping with the humble, peasant traditions of the dishes that I most like to cook. Any guidance would be appreciated! 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 381
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 October 2011 at 19:41
Probably the best way to improve the presentation of your plates is to look carefully at how the best chefs do it.  Thomas Keller is one of the very best, and his Bouchon restaurants are based on bistro foods prepared with perfect technique and refined presentation.  That has a lot in common with your interest in well-prepared peasant dishes, and you could learn a lot from looking at the Bouchon restaurant website or, even better, getting a copy of the Bouchon cookbook http://www.amazon.com/Bouchon-Thomas-Keller/dp/1579652395 -- one of my favorite cookbooks.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 October 2011 at 09:03
Thanks for the book recommendaton - I'll start putting aside some cash for it ~ I watch the food network and similar shows and try to keep an eye on how they do things. sometimes the plating seems a little "uptown" for peasant dishes, but one thing I have been paying attention to lately is the use of colour and as you say how it is arranged. This is definitely an area where I want to improve, since an attractive plate, even if it is simple, goes a long way.
 
I was thinking about what you said here:
 
Quote Cooking individual components of such peasant dishes with the optimal technique to maximize the flavor of each component before bringing them all together....
 
This is something I have been edging toward a few times lately without really realizing I was doing it, and have seen some great results even in the most basic, week-night table fare. I'll definitely be putting more thought into it.
 
Thanks again for some seriously good advice!
 
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4124
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 11:06
I enjoy fancy plating myself, Ron. We do, after all, eat with our eyes first.  But you can get carried away with the concept.
 
Here, for instance, we're talking about rustic foods. There's no need, IMO, to get all fancy schmancy.
 
Your plating of the soup, for example, only suffers from one thing: it's monochromatic. The soup, bowl, and plate are all the same color. So, if you really need to jazz up the presentation, change the serviceware. Frankly, for family dining, I wouldn't even do that.
 
Sometimes, I think, we get too chefy for our own good. And I'm put in mind of that great quote from Mitchell Davis: "I recall another recipe," he said in an interview, "that had you strain a soup twice through a chinois. This sort of excess use of equipment and refinement (if you strain something once at home, I think it's strained enough) is a hallmark of chef recipes...When we eat at home, the soup can be a little lumpy."
 
Same goes for at-home plating. It doesn't have to look like a food stylist was at work.
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 381
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 11:49
As far as the monochrome soup problem goes, yes, different color service could help, but you only need to look at some of the in-process photos above (those with the bay leaf and bits of herbs prominent) to see what the finished product really needs visually: garnish.

And I simply disagree on the validity of getting "fancy shmancy" with family cooking.  There definitely are foods that are legitimately best served as rustic, but more often than not I find claims that "I'm cooking rustically" or "I'm just cooking for my family" to be excuses for a lack of basic technique or for an excess of laziness.  It just doesn't take much effort to strain a sauce, or even to strain it more than once.  It just doesn't take much effort to wipe drips off the rim of a plate, or to offer something more visually appealing than three-plop cafeteria style -- meat at 6-o'clock, starch at 10, veg at 2.  A little extra care quickly leads to noticeable results.  Even a tiny recognition of that effort is enough to keep me motivated to do more, and it just gets easier with practiced good habits.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 12:09

interesting comments from both - thanks for putting them forward.

i've got some "brighter" yellow and greenish service (you all have probably seen them in other posts) that, looking back, would have done much better with this particular dish. i didn't think about it at the time, but lately have been trying to step up a little bit on things like that, when and where i can. easy, simple things that i can do in order to make a picture just a little nicer - both for the benefit of the dish and diners, and also for the forum - let's face it, a person visiting here or seeing the projects we do will be much more inspired to try a dish if it has some stunning impact. this doesn't mean that it has to be gussied-up to the point where it is fit for the hotel royale in paris, but there's nothing wrong with maximising what you can do.

with two dishes that i completed recently, Maddie's Pork Chops and Geschmorter Schweinsbraten mit Kapern, i tried to incorporate some of this while still keeping it "rustic" or at least non-fancy-schmancy, keeping an eye toward colours and making things pleasing to the eye or highlight the ingredients. i think i did pretty well, and as soon as i get the pix posted, i hope you will all agree.

i don't have the skills or the resources for TV- or magazine-quality stuff, but at the same time, i do believe that even rustic foods can look great on a plate or in a setting. i've seen examples of this in the books i've read. as an example, daikon mentions the bay-leaf shot above, and i must admit, looking through many of the posts i've done in the past, anywhere i've got a bay leaf floating in the mix, it really does add some visual impact. taking this out from bay leaves to other visually-pleasing shots, seeing such pictures always inspires a little extra effort from myself and, hopefully, from anyone wishing to try the dish.

If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5663
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 12:38
 
Portuguese bean soup ... yum ... thanks so much for posting. This is very similar to CALDO GALLEGO which is the Galician version --- just north of Portugal in northwestern Spain ... Basically same dish, that is why the name ... Gallegos speak Gallego which is a fusion of Portuguese, Spanish and Latin with some Celtic thrown in for good measure.
 
I enjoy it very much ... I also put beetroot tops chopped in mine as the Galicians do ...
 
I am going to try yours before it gets too warm ---
 
Margi.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2012 at 13:23
for those of you preparing ham for easter, this might be a great use for the ham bone!!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5663
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 05:18
@ Tas,
 
Thanks for posting this wonderful wintery bean soup. I have had it when I have travelled over to Portugal. It is quite similar to the Galician version, called CALDO GALLEGO ... This is also delicious.
 
The quintessential ingredients for the Caldo Gallego ( Galician Broth ) are: beetroot or turnip greens and in Galicia, there is an indigenious green called GRELOS which are employed however, they are really not turnip greens, they are similar ... and the Pork shoulder used is called LACÓN ...
 
Your recipe is in the AUTUMN FILE !
 
Happy Holidays.
Kindest. Margi
 
 
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
ChrisFlanders View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 01 March 2012
Location: Flanders
Status: Offline
Points: 338
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 07:40
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

... things that i can do in order to make a picture just a little nicer - both for the benefit of the dish and diners, and also for the forum - let's face it, a person visiting here or seeing the projects we do will be much more inspired to try a dish if it has some stunning impact. this doesn't mean that it has to be gussied-up to the point where it is fit for the hotel royale in paris, but there's nothing wrong with maximising what you can do.

Oh yes and since I love a well made ànd presented soup, I'm gonna post some soup plating ideas soon in another thread called "Inspired soups". But I also think you don't need too much embellishment on rustic soups like this... however, every cook likes a "waaw" when serving plates, after all, don't we all cook to please other people?

I would make this soup a little different, Ron, even if it means to step away from traditional preparations. When looking at the ingredients from the recipe from cb900f (baitshopboyz.com), this is what I would do;

- sorry, but the rice goes, imo it doesn't belong here between ànd beans ànd potato

- beans; Soak overnight, drain. Next day, put to boil in fresh water vividly for 1-2 minute, discart water and rinse beans with cold water. Put fresh cold water in pot, add beans, twig of savory, and cook for no longer than 90 minutes or longer if necessary, meaning until just done but beans not breaking apart. Add salt ONLY at 80 minutes cooking time or ...they will never soften when salt is added in the beginning! Sieve, cool beans asap under streaming water and set aside. (btw, savory is typical bean companion. We call it "bonekruid" in dutch, meaning bean-herb, it helps the digestion of beans and unwanted sound contributions afterward so to speak)

- hambone bouillon; cover with ample cold water, just enough to make the soup, add aromates like rough chunks of carrot, celery, onion, crushed garlic. Peppercorns, bayleaf, thyme, salt. Let simmer for around an hour. Sieve the bouillon and preserve. Remove the meat from the bone and cut in nice small cubes. The veggies are no longer needed, they are boiled to death.

- Make another batch of fresh vegetables but this time in nice small brunoise. Onion, carrot, potato, branch of celery or piece of celeriac in cubes, parsnip and/or turnip if you like. Start with sweating the onion for quite a while (5-8 minutes) without browning, add all other veg's and keep frying on very low fire for another 5-8 minutes. Add bouillon from the hambone. Bring to a simmer for 20 minutes, not longer! Add beans and hamcubes to warm through. Serve in bowls and add some nicely cut parcely in every bowl.

- While the soup is simmering; spread open a sheet of storebought puff pastry, cut in not too narrow strips: sort of tagliatelle or pappardelle style, brush with egg, beaten with a drop of water, sprinkle spices on as you like, I like caroway seeds. You can wind these strips like corscrews if you're ambitious or simply leave them flat as they are. Put in a very hot oven until nicely done. Serve as breadsticks. A hint; make plenty of these, they go superfast!

 

Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 08:58
hi, chris - some interesting ideas here ~
 
>>>- sorry, but the rice goes, imo it doesn't belong here between ànd beans ànd potato<<<
 
i certainly understand this - starch, startch, starch. i took the potatoes out fo the recipe years ago for the same reason, substitutin carrots, which i think would still be in keeping with the traditions. i do, admittedly, like the addition of the rice - but can't fault someone for wanting to remove it.
 
>>>Add salt ONLY at 80 minutes cooking time or ...they will never soften when salt is added in the beginning! <<<
 
this is a good tip, thank you!
 
your "modified" technique sounds delicious ~ certainly worth a try, and those breadsticks sound wonderful! i look forward to seeing this if you do try it, along with other "inspired soups!" Thumbs Up
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5663
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 10:40
@ Tas,
 
Rice is not an ingredient in neither traditional Caldo Gallego nor classic Portuguese Soup however, Sausage varieties are and / or Ham Hock ... I aplogise -- I overlooked that !
 
Kindest. Margi.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
AK1 View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 10 April 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 1091
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 January 2013 at 15:09
This looks so tasty I'm gonna make it tomorow. I got a ham bone sitting in the freezer from Christmas.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 January 2013 at 15:14
looking forward to it, darko! let us know how you like it!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5663
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 January 2013 at 04:53
Tas and Ak1,
 
Wanted to briefly mention, that the Portuguese & the Brazilians, employ white beans, or red or black turtle beans or pinto beans in their soups, depending on the Portuguese or Brazilian region in which they reside or travel to.
 
AK1: Let us know how it turns out, and please do post a photo ...
 
PLEASE NOTE: if you look at the South American Section; one of the 1st recipes I had ever posted 1 year ago when I joined FOTW, was FEIJOADA; and I had provided a very brief intro on the color of the bean history as my opening article ...
 
 
HAPPY NEW YEAR & FELIZ LOS REYES;
THE 3 WISE MEN; JANUARY 6th;
Margaux.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
AK1 View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 10 April 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 1091
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 January 2013 at 10:58
It was a hit! I had 2 bowls, my wife had 2 bowls, my cousin was visiting , had a bowl and took some home with him, his wife called later thanking me and said it was delicious.

I made this first batch following Rons original recipe and it's definitely some thing I'll make again and play with the recipe.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.062 seconds.