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Oliebollen

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: Europe
Forum Name: The Low Countries
Forum Discription: Belgium and the Netherlands.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=1631
Printed Date: 23 March 2019 at 09:39


Topic: Oliebollen
Posted By: pitrow
Subject: Oliebollen
Date Posted: 01 January 2012 at 22:01
Oliebollen (literally oil bulbs) are a traditional dutch treat at new years. They are a deep fried pastry, kind of a cross between a French beignet and an American apple fritter. My mom made these last night so I didn't have a chance to get pictures of the prep, but I do have a finished pic and the recipe to share.

Ingredients:
0.5 ounce active dry yeast
1 cup lukewarm milk
2.25 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt
1 egg
1.5 cups raisins (black and golden)
1 Granny Smith apple (peeled, cored and finely chopped)
1 quart vegetable oil for frying
1 cup confectioner's/powdered sugar for dusting

Directions
1) Mix yeast and warm milk, let stand for a few minutes to dissolve.
2) Sift the flour and salt into a large bowl.
3) Stir in the egg and yeast mixture, mix into a smooth batter.
4) Stir in the raisins and apple.
5) Cover the bowl and let stand in a warm, draft-free place to rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour
6) Heat oil in deep fryer or heavy pan to 375 degrees F (190*C).
7) Use 2 metal spoons to shape scoops of dough into balls, and drop them carefully into the hot oil.
8) Fry the balls until golden brown, about 8 minutes
9) The doughnuts should be soft and not greasy. If the oil is not hot enough, the outside will be tough and the inside will be greasy.
10) Drain the finished doughnuts on paper towels and dust with confection's sugar.
11) Serve them piled on a dish with more confection's sugar dusted over them.
12) Eat them hot if possible.





Replies:
Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 01 January 2012 at 22:17
very nice, and they look easy to do, as well!
 
thanks for posting, mike - and thanks to your mom, for bringing the recipe down through the family so that it could be shared with us!


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Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 02 January 2012 at 02:34
Those do look good...that's going on my to-do list for sure.

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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 29 December 2015 at 16:05
bump. just about time to make these again! mmm.

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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 29 December 2015 at 17:45
Olliebolen are definitely not good for you, Mike. I suggest if you do make a new batch that you send 'em down here for proper disposal.

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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: AK1
Date Posted: 29 December 2015 at 18:21
I just go to the local donut joint & buy a dozen apple fritters. Did I mention I really like Apple fritters.


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 30 December 2015 at 09:35
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Olliebolen are definitely not good for you, Mike. I suggest if you do make a new batch that you send 'em down here for proper disposal.


I would do that, but they're really not as good when they've sat for a bit. Wink you need to eat them fresh.

Originally posted by AK1 AK1 wrote:

I just go to the local donut joint & buy a dozen apple fritters. Did I mention I really like Apple fritters.


local donut shop? What's that? The closest thing we have around here are the bakeries at the supermarkets and they suck at making donuts! Cry I would die for a good apple fritter around here, but it's probably a good 45 minute drive to find a decent one.


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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 30 December 2015 at 09:40
What am I missing, Mike? An apple, some sweet batter, and a deep fryer. Voila!

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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: AK1
Date Posted: 30 December 2015 at 11:29
I've got a couple of indie donut shops fairly close by that still make everything from scratch.


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 30 December 2015 at 12:18
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

What am I missing, Mike? An apple, some sweet batter, and a deep fryer. Voila!


you're pretty set! Add some raisins and powdered sugar for icing and you've got it perfect Smile


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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 11 January 2016 at 18:59
These look as good now as they did when I first saw your first post - what a terrible time to cut nearly all of my carbs! Cry

Hopefully, by Christmas, I will be in a position where I can sneak one or two...or three ~ Embarrassed


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Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 31 December 2018 at 14:30
Tonight's the night to make these! I'm going to attempt to make a batch tonight, but it's going to depend on if I can stay up long enough. The wife and I are going to the movies after work and we'll see how I'm doing when we get back.

In the meantime, I've written up a bit of history of the oliebollen, since I didn't bother to include it in my original post. Enjoy.

The exact history of oliebollen is unknown, but there are several thoughts on how and why they came about. Probably the most popular is the theory that they were first made by Germanic tribes in what would become The Netherlands during the Yule period. It is said that the goddess Perchta would roam the countryside at midwinter, and enter homes during the twelve days between Christmas and Epiphany. If the children and young servants had been good during the year she would leave them a small silver coin. But if they had been bad, she would slit open their bellies and remove their stomach and entrails and fill the opening with stones and straw. It is said that because of the fat/grease in the oliebollen her sword would slide right off the stomach of anyone that ate the oliebollen. A rather fantastical story to be sure, but an amusing one none the less.

Another theory is that Jewish refugees emigrating to The Netherlands brought the precursors to oliebollen with them when they fled Portugal in the early 1500s.

A third theory is that during the dark ages people made these cheap, but calorie laden treats to give to the poor and hungry.

The earliest record of what could be considered oliebollen is painting from 1652 that shows balls very similar in appearance to an oliebol, and also a recipe for "oliekoecken" (oil cake/cookies) that appeared in the 1667 Dutch cookbook "De Verstandige Kock"  (The Sensible Cook). The recipe called for cooks to make a dough from wheat flour, then add raisins that were softened in water along with chopped apples, almonds and spices. Add milk and yeast until you have a thick batter and allow it to rise, then form balls and fry them. As you can see it's pretty similar to the oliebol recipe from above.

"Oliekoek" were popular for several centuries, and it wasn't until the mid-19th century that the term oliebollen started to take hold. It's not known why the change was made, but it's clear from the 1868 edition of the Dutch dictionary by Van Dale that it was in use by then. However, the rival dictionary "Woordenboek der Nederlandsche taal" (dictionary of the Dutch language) from 1896 stated that "oliekoek" is the more commonly used term, but by the early 20th century oliebollen was the more popular term and oliekoek was no longer used.

It is said that the oliebollen are the basis for our modern donuts.


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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 02 January 2019 at 08:47
Well I didn't get to make these on New Year's Eve, which would be more traditional, but I did make a batch on New Year's Day. the only thing I did differently from the recipe above is I soaked the raisins overnight in vanilla vodka. Mmm.

http://vangrunsven.me/gallery/image/EUVn">


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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 22 January 2019 at 12:16
Mike - I saw that you had posted this, but wasn't able to read it until now. Great job!

I really enjoy reading the backstories and histories of how different foods come about and are woven into history. In this case, it is also a good read on the usage of the term, as well.

I'm trying to avoid such foods....but the truth is that I would love a dish of these in front of me right now - they look delicious!

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