Print Page | Close Window

butchering your own wild game

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: The Best Foods You Can Get - Your Own
Forum Name: Hunting and Fishing
Forum Discription: Hunting and fishing fed us for many thousands of years - discuss it here.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=227
Printed Date: 16 December 2019 at 04:27


Topic: butchering your own wild game
Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Subject: butchering your own wild game
Date Posted: 18 February 2010 at 17:26
we spend a lot of time each year butchering our game - i am very particular about it and tend to go overboard, but the final result is very much worth it. i know i've posted this before, but here's a summary; if you have any further or specific questions, just ask.
 
immediately upon the kill, we field dress and keep the heart and liver for my dad and oldest son. we then wash out the cavity either at the site of the kill, at the hunting vehicle or as soon as we can when we get back. somewhere between this point and after hanging, we also remove the tenderloins.
 
thanks to our climate here that rarely goes above 40 degrees during most of the gunting season, i am able to hang the deer (head down and skin on) for around 10 days to a maximum of two weeks. this promotes tenderness and, in my opinion, a lot of flavor as the connective tissues and enzymes break down (NOT rot!). then i skin the deer and quarter the carcass (including removing the loins) without a saw and bone the quarters.
 
with careful trimming, i then remove everything that isn't meat from the quarters including any bone, fat, membrane, silverskin etc., leaving nothing but a pristine roast that can be left as-is or carved into steaks of any thickness.
 
i vacuum-pack everything into 1-pound packages and freeze as quickly as possible. i also usually save the neck and wrap it as a separate roast for my father, who seems to enjoy it along with heart and liver, which i have eaten but generally do not favor. this year, i might also try packaging sections of the ribs in order to barbecue them over slow smoke next year; i think that if i keep them moist during cooking, they should turn out very good.
 
scraps and trimmings that are meat go into a bowl and then  later made into jerky or ground and packaged without any fat and frozen so that they can  later be used for burger, sausage, jerky or anything else.
 
there are usually a lot of undesirable trimmings that are packaged in larger packages of paper and labeled as dog food.
 
------------
 

in response to a couple of questions from a friend, here are a couple of clarifications:

tenderloins and loins are two different things entirely, but both are the best meat on a deer. very tender and if cooked right will literally melt in your mouth.

the loins run along each side of the backbone on the back side of the deer. on a pig they would be called pork chops and on a cow they are called ribeye steaks. i cut them off the bone so that they are boneless and in my opinion much better. they come off in one long strip from the back of the neck to the hind quarters; you then trim all fat etc. so that all that is left is just the meat.

tenderloins are underneath between the backbone/ribcage and the guts. when the deer is field-dressed, the tenderloins are exposed and will dry out while the deer hangs, so they are removed immediately.

they are the best meat in the animal, with the loins coming in a very close second and anything from the hindquarters coming next.

the front quarters/shoulders provide some steaks but are mostly trimmed and then cut in cubes for stew meat or ground. sometimes people save a whole shoulder and BBQ or roast it, but i prefer to trim everything because deer fat, membrane etc can really give a funky flavor and doesn't have a good shelf-life.



-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!



Replies:
Posted By: kiwi
Date Posted: 18 February 2010 at 20:00
here we call the loin 'backsteaks' and the tenderloin 'salmon fillet'. no idea why on that last one, maybe bacause it is almost as tender as salmon on a nice animal? I've got a good recipe for tenderloin, I'll chuck it up in the kiwi /aussie section when I get time.


-------------
kai time!


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 18 February 2010 at 20:30
hey, kiwi - that would be great - looking forward to it ~
 
amazing how different names and monikers spring up in different areas. most of the time, the origin of the name is lost in time.


Posted By: jkeith
Date Posted: 19 February 2010 at 06:52
Agree with everything you said.  I'm a big believer in field dressing ASAP and cooling down right away.  This can be a challenge hunting in NC, but is worth the effort.  When  we dove hunt on opening day it is usually in the 90s.  My son and I both carry a small cooler with ice and try to breast out the doves as soon as they hit the ground and throw them  on ice.  Makes a world of difference in the taste of the meat.
 
For deer I have never "aged" the meat simply because I can't hang them outside in our temperatures and don't have a cooler big enough.  I do hear of folks letting the meat sit for several days in ice water, but have never tried this. 
 
Deboning the meat on deer and removing all fat, silverskin, etc., does wonders for the flavor. 
 
Okay, I've got a nice venison loin (backstrap) sitting in the freezer....what are your favorite recipes for this piece of prime meat?


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 19 February 2010 at 07:14
jkeith - yep, in your climate, hanging to age just isn't possible, unless you have access to a meatlocker. i imagine (and this would be a guess) that the best a person could do would be overnight in order to let the muscles relax as much as possible. i have heard of people cutting into quarters, then into an ice chest or refrigerator, and have done this for antelope on a few occasions, but for myself, i would never soak in water, saltwater or anything else like that. i could be wrong, but to me, this would replace a lot of the venison flavor with something else.
 
recipes ~ oh, there are so many! my absolute favorite is simply thinly-sliced "medallions," seasoned and then breaded in flour and then pan fried a bit on each side, with simple pan gravy. it's pretty basic, but i've got a recipe for this and will post it this afternoon or early this evening your time. i also have a couple of recipes for the grill or the smoker, which i will post. will most likely post these in the "midwest/great plains" forum.
 
if you want a complete selection of wild fish and game recipes, a great place to look is http://www.baitshopboyz.com - www.baitshopboyz.com !


Posted By: jkeith
Date Posted: 19 February 2010 at 08:03
I've done the medallions and they are wonderful.  Have also cooked it in the crockpot as a roast and have cut it up for stew.  The one time I cooked it on the grill it did not come out well....too dry.  I did wrap it in bacon and slow cooked  but I suppose I overcooked it (trying to keep it medium rare).  Grilling tips on this cut of meat would be appreciated.....never tried smoking....


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 19 February 2010 at 09:05

grilling and smoking venison is easy - just keep it moist! wrapping in bacon is a good way, also brushing with olive oil or an oil-based mop. i'll also post a few in the grilling/smoking forum - there are a couple of kabob recipes there now that i made with deer and had great results ~ this one in particular:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=101&title=middle-eastern-style-kabobs - http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=101&title=middle-eastern-style-kabobs
 
really worked well!Star
 
i always cook my deer to something pretty close to well done, but this is a perosnal preference only. i think medium or medium rare is fine. one thing about your own deer (and this kind of goes back to the original post) is that you know everything about your meat during every step of the process!Clap


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 07 December 2011 at 09:21
i have some very good information, with step-by-step written and picture detail, from the hutning and fishing library. it covers the entire process from field dressing to packaging and freezing and is a great resource.
 
it's in .pdf format, so i am unable to post it here at this time. i'll figure out a way to share it here sooner or later; in the meantime, if anyone is interested in it, send me a pm or an mailto:deltaforce_iktomi@yahoo.com - email , and i would be happy to pass it along.
 
but the main thing ~ i've said it before and i will say it again:

remove ANYTHING that isn't meat, and you will be ok.

that is the NUMBER ONE rule as far as i am concerned. our steaks and roasts have everything removed: bones, fat, silverskin, membrane etc. - it all goes to the dog. i even take down individual roasts in order to get strips of silverskins that (over the years) i have learned are inside. anything that goes into the freezer labeled roast, steak or cubes will be meat only.

when it comes to burger, sausage and jerky trimmings, i relax a little bit, but not much and ONLY where some of the thinner, clear membranes between muscles are concerned, since it would be a shame to waste that meat. this is because there is plenty of meat that is great for these purposes, and the very light-textured membranes i am referring to either melt away in cooking (collagen) or dry on jerky. by membranes i don't mean silverskin, which is whiter in colour and much heavier in nature/texture - that STILL comes off of everything.

also, my oldest son likes to keep the hocks/shanks whole for smoking or braising with beans or something. other than that, if it ain't meat, it's gone.

my kids hate how "anal" i am about that, but regardless, i make damn sure they learn to do it that way. the meat is a lot better for it and it shows in the finished meal that is prepared from such meat.



-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 07 December 2011 at 11:28
in my original post, i mention hanging your wild game - there are many ways to do this, but i can't imagine anything easier than this:

simply drill a hole:

screw in a hook:

hoist her up:

and hook her on....

...repeat for other leg.





-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: DIYASUB
Date Posted: 10 December 2011 at 16:04
 Ron,
 The lads think you're a bit anal about how you remove unwanted stuff from venison? I've got just the recipe for them.
 Venison Cracklings
 Cut up some venison fat into cubes 1" by 1" by 1/2", then fry it up until golden brown. Put it into a strainer while still hot and press as much lard out as possible using the back of a ladle. Plate it, salt it, and serve it. Then sit back and watch the fun. In just a couple of minutes they're gonna look like a couple of cats tryin' to gag up some hairballs. It wont take but a couple of minutes more and they'll become totally OCD about removing all fat from venison.LOL


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 10 December 2011 at 22:37
ClapEvil SmileLOL

-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 07:38
Simple fact is, those who complain that venison tastes "gamey" are the ones who do not remove all those non-meat parts. Venison fat will go rancid even while frozen.
 
I would never let venison (or any meat or fish) sit in water. Not only does the flavor leech out, you're setting yourself up for bacterial growth and spoilage. But I do keep my quarters chilled, in coolers, as I work on butchering the meat. The venison is up on a rack, though, and the drain plug left open. So the meat never touches water.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 10:00
agree 100%, brook ~ also, i said it in my original post, but i should probably make clear, regarding the hanging/aging deer: i am able to do this becuase my climate allows it; i don't recommend it for folks in warmer/moister climates, but even for those, a hang for at least overnight, if possible, would do wonders to help the muscles relax. quartering and putting in a cooler (above any water or leakage as you describe) is of course an acceptable substitute, but i find that the muscles don't get the slight benefit of stretching a bit as they hang, which does contribute to more tender meat. of course, if climate or conditions preclude any hanging at all, then that's the end of that.
 
when hanging, i prefer to leave skin/hide on, to keep the carcass from drying out, but if i am going to put quarters in a cooler, of course i would skin the carcass first.


-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 11:30
On the other hand, Ron, here's a quick tutorial on how not to do it:
 
1. Sneak out on the prarie and shoot a pronghorn.
2. Hike back to wherever it is that you left the truck.
3. Drive to downed antelope.
4. First take the time to sharpen your knife.
5. Field dress the antelope; hopefully remembering that the diaphram and lungs are part of what needs to be removed.
6. Tie carcass to hood of truck.
7. Drive to gin mill.
8. Hoist a few while you brag on the great shot you made.
9. Return home. It's now too late to do anything, so leave carcass tied to truck.
10. Butcher antelope next day, leaving much of the fat and connective tissue in place.
11. Complain forevermore about how gamey and off-tasting pronghorn is. Must be because they eat sagebrush.
 
Trust me, I did not make this up. Seen it, or variations of it, more than once.
 
(edited to correct "sagebrush" for no other reason than I finally learned how. Embarrassed)


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 11:57
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

On the other hand, Ron, here's a quick tutorial on how not to do it:
 
1. Sneak out on the prarie, roll down the window of the pickup, have your friend hold your beer and shoot a pronghorn.
2. Hike back to wherever it is that you left the truck.
3. Drive to downed antelope.
4. First take the time to sharpen your knife.
5. Field dress the antelope; hopefully remembering that the diaphram and lungs are part of what needs to be removed.
6. Tie carcass to hood of truck.
7. Drive to gin mill.
8. Hoist a few while you brag on the great shot you made.
9. Return home. It's now too late to do anything, so leave carcass tied to truck.
10. Butcher antelope next day, leaving much of the fat and connective tissue in place.
11. Complain forevermore about how gamey and off-tasting pronghorn is. Must be because they eat safebrush.
 
Trust me, I did not make this up. Seen it, or variations of it, more than once.
 
fixed lines # 1 and 2 for you!


-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 13:23
Not to be argumentative, Ron. But the folks who do it your way drive jeeps. Wink
 
I used to skin professionally, for a processor. Putting the slobs aside, I always found it incredible the number of hunters who 1. could not properly field-dress a deer, and 2. who had no idea where the kill zone actually lies.
 
I also never understood why anyone would pay somebody else to skin their deer. But I wasn't going to turn down the money.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 13:27
yep, i am afraid on both your points, my observations have been pretty much the same.
 
i've done my own deer (and my dad's, and my kids' - and sometimes for friends) all my life, and i do feel i've gotten good at what i know, but it amazes me that i am able to learn something new, or at least expand on it, each year. ~ i've only had it done for my by a processor once, and while the meat etc. was fine, it just seemed like a waste of money to me ~


-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 13:44
I agree. Plus the only time I had a processor do it I was ripped off royally. That's when I vowed to learn to do my own.
 
Yes, like you, I learn something new every year. But at base, it's basically following the dots, because each muscle group is separated by connective tissue.
 
When I was skinning professionally, we got 15 bucks to do that job, and kept the hides (and brains, for that matter, which we used for tanning). The processor charged $65 on top of that. I just can't imagine paying that kind of money for something that just takes a little time.
But people just don't want to learn.
 
When I butcher other people's deer I take a hindquarter and the tenderloins as my payment. But you know what? The line would still form on the left, if I let it.
 
Amazing.
 


Posted By: DIYASUB
Date Posted: 23 February 2012 at 18:23
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

On the other hand, Ron, here's a quick tutorial on how not to do it:
 
1. Sneak out on the prarie and shoot a pronghorn.
2. Hike back to wherever it is that you left the truck.
3. Drive to downed antelope.
4. First take the time to sharpen your knife.
5. Field dress the antelope; hopefully remembering that the diaphram and lungs are part of what needs to be removed.
6. Tie carcass to hood of truck.
7. Drive to gin mill.
8. Hoist a few while you brag on the great shot you made.
9. Return home. It's now too late to do anything, so leave carcass tied to truck.
10. Butcher antelope next day, leaving much of the fat and connective tissue in place.
11. Complain forevermore about how gamey and off-tasting pronghorn is. Must be because they eat safebrush.
 
Trust me, I did not make this up. Seen it, or variations of it, more than once.
 
 Ya left out step #9.5 when doing deer!
 9.5) Hang deer on front porch in direct sunlight, in 50-60 degree October weather, for neighbors to marvel over the hunter's prowess.


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 24 February 2012 at 08:55
Ain't that the truth, Dyasub!
 
Is it just me? Or does it seem that the smaller and less imposing the animal, the more likely it is to get hung in public view? 


-------------
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: Melissa Mead
Date Posted: 28 October 2012 at 09:42
Thanks for this topic! (I'm having a character field-dress a deer, which I've never even seen done.)

-------------
Melissa

http://carpelibris.wordpress.com/ - http://carpelibris.wordpress.com/



Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 29 October 2012 at 08:26
Hi, Melissa -
 
I'm glad this was helpful - if you or anyone else has any questions, let me know. I was literally http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.4258972004600.160413.1594908980&type=1&l=249b865657" rel="nofollow - up to my elbows in the field-dressing process just a couple of days ago , and over the next few days I'll be into the butchering/processing, so it's all fresh in my mind ~ Tongue


-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 29 October 2012 at 09:06
Great Job, and looks like you and your two team men, have learnt the tricks of deer butchering very well. Thanks for posting your photos.
As you know, how culturally skeemish, people can be; I have to look at the gastronomic side of things and how delicious they can be ... LOL  Wink
Here are some venison dishes to set the autumn and winter season in good tidings:
 
Venison Filet Mignon.
 
 
 
Venison Rag├╣ ( can be placed on Polenta Bed or Tubular shaped Pasta or Ribbon Pasta variety ).
 
 
 
 
Venison Stew and / or Venison Steak Tartar Ground.
 
 
 
 
Venison Goulash.
 
VENISON: Tagine Slow Simmered Stew, Kebabs, Sausages, Stroganoff, Charcuterie Air Dried or Smoked and Vension Burgers are some other suggestions.
 
Enjoy,
Margi.  
 
 
 
 
 
*** Photo Courtesy: Public Domain Uncopyrighted.


-------------
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 29 November 2015 at 22:52
Much of this is probably duplicated in previous posts, but the subject came up on another forum, so I am posting my reply here. One day, I will compile all of this information into a single essay, but that day is not today.

The question was regarding whether or not hanging and aging a deer carcass had any benefit. Here's my reply:

I've shot, butchered and eaten deer since 1983, and I've had the opportunity to try venison almost every way, ranging from butchered the same day that it was shot (not by choice), to hanging from November until March (also not by choice). In between, I've let them hang 5 days, a week, 10 days, two weeks, three weeks and as long as a month. The deciding factor, in all cases, was the intersection of temperature with available time, so my experiences apply to my specific area only, or areas that are like my area. In most cases, the deer were mule deer (muley) does, although there were also some mature bucks and a couple of yearlings. In at least two cases the deer were superannuated. There were also several whitetails of both sexes. In all cases, the deer ate on some farmed grains (wheat and barley), as well as alfalfa and whatever grass or sage they could browse. These were not only my own deer, but also deer that had been shot by my father and by my sons. My conclusions are that both hanging and aging contribute to better tenderness and flavour, within reason.

Obviously, the extremes (same day and 4 months) are not at all recommended. In the "same-day" case, it was a yearling whitetail. The meat was ragged, tough, and had an unpleasant taste that reminded me of metallic, rotten milk. This deer (closely followed by one that I had a processor do) stands as my absolute worst venison of all time, when the age and species should have put it in the top 5. In the 4-month case, it was due to the fact that it was frozen solid in sub-zero temperatures for the vast majority of that time. The meat from that deer (a mature muley buck) was actually quite good and quite tender, but there was an "outer layer" of 1/4-inch on some exposed parts that was no good. This was my dad's deer, and I wasn't too happy about it going so long, but the meat underneath WAS just fine. I include this example because it demonstrates that even when the situation goes way out control, you can salvage it, if you pay attention to details.

If memory serves, a University of Wyoming study found that hanging and aging deer for 10 days at 40 degrees is optimum, and my experience would be about the same, although an extra week or so has never hurt anything. The vast majority of deer were butchered and in the freezer within a month, with most butchering being started at 2 weeks, although once again, starting at 3 weeks hasn't hurt anything. Venison has always been more flavourful and certainly more tender in the two-week range; after 3 weeks, the meat is starting to get "too tender" (for lack of a better term), but has never been mushy. Another benefit of hanging is that when hanging, the weight of the deer causes a slight stretching that contributes to tenderness. In all cases, I would not describe the taste as gamey. To put it more simply: my wife complains about the taste of venison if it is butchered inside of 10 days, but not if it hangs 10 days to 3 weeks - she seems to enjoy those. As for those hanging longer, she has not expressed an opinion one way or the other, but I hadn't yet met her when the 4-month hang happened.

Very important: Respect the meat! A calm, 1-shot kill is important. Quick field-dressing is a given; removing of the entire windpipe as well as propping open the chest cavity are vital. We also usually rinse the body cavity right away with cold water, since we almost always stop by at my dad's place after hunting and he has a spigot/hose right there. I leave the hide on until it is time to butcher; the reason for this is because in a very short time, it is going to be cold anyway (night) and because the hide keeps the meat from drying out while hanging and aging. But depending on location/climate, this might not be feasible. I contend that hanging and adequate aging (when possible) are just two small steps in an entire chain of events that leads to good meat. Above all, when butchering, do it right! Remove ALL fat, silverskin, membrane etc. before packaging and especially before eating. These are the primary cause of gamey flavour. Go boneless with your cuts - and my advice is to also avoid the bone saw. It can be done, and leads to better quality, in my opinion. Cuts with bones, bone chips and bone dust are not necessary. Just because you are used to seeing pork chops with an attached rib or round steaks with a ring of bone, doesn't mean that this is good for venison. The fats, connective tissues etc. are not the same. 

Once again, I repeat for emphasis: my area/region/climate is friendly toward this practice; yours might not be. Temperatures at night are in the 20s or lower, temperatures in the day are rarely over 40 - or, if they are, it is not for any significant length of time and the carcass stays very well-chilled. If I were much farther south, I wouldn't hang nearly as long - but I would still hang, whenever feasible. The same University of Wyoming study outlines definite benefits to hanging, with added benefits to aging, so I do both, because I can. Your situation might be different, but if you are in the far north and have regularly-cold temperatures, there should be no issues as long as you are aware of what's going on.

Since 1983, I've never had gamey-tasting meat, because I took care of it. I've had flavourful meat and tender meat to varying degrees, but the meat that made it to the plate has never been gamey or rotten. The deer we shot two weeks ago was frozen solid at 10 days, so it probably won't get done until next weekend after a couple of days in the 30s and 40s, but I have 100% confidence that she will be quite fine. She was a mature doe who went down with one shot as she was eating alfalfa and winter wheat sprouts, and she will be very well-trimmed when she is butchered. Those are the main factors, but the fact that she spent time aging and hanging will push her from "very good" to "absolutely delicious."

I don't know everything, but I do know venison. I say all of this with confidence because I've gone from one extreme to the other under varying circumstances and have pretty-well wrung out most of the scenarios. If 30+ years of real-life experience are worth anything, then I hope someone gets some benefit from this.


-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 30 November 2015 at 06:31
Fascinating report and outstanding penning.

-------------
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 30 November 2015 at 08:50
Ya know, Ron, I have never had venison that tasted gamey. Not if I was involved in the killing (my own kills or when acting as a guide), field dressing, and butchering.

I also think, many times, folks who complain of deer being gamey are merely projecting a mental expectation. I know several people who insist that venison is gamey, but who devour lamb, and even mutton. Go figure.

In areas where hanging isn't feasible (and, you're right, it's the best way to go when possible), I've come up with a pretty good second choice.

I break down the deer into primals and large muscle groups. These go in a large cooler, along with plenty of ice. The venison is elevated on a rack, to assure it never sits in water. Plus the drain plug remains open.

This creates a temperature environment in the high 30's, close enough to the ideal 40F as to make no never mind. Trick is to use a high-quality cooler. I wouldn't trust those foam jobs for this.

Another aspect of butchering: The more time you devote, the more usable meat you'll harvest. For instance, I take the time to save all those tiny bits and shavings. For instance, when you cut off the silverskin there's almost always a thin layer of meat. I filet that off.

A typical deer will actually yield 3-5 pounds of those shavings, which are ideal for chili and tacos. Much better than the ground meat typically used for them.

I don't know anyone else who bothers with that. But to me it's well worthwhile. And is one of the secrets of my chili---which everyone loves.

-------------
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 30 November 2015 at 22:12
Agreed on all counts, Brook! Thumbs Up

-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!


Posted By: drinks
Date Posted: 05 December 2015 at 12:41
Texas version, shoot deer at crack of dawn, make sure it is at least 75', put in PU bed. drive to at least 5 beer joints and display animal.
about 4 pm, gut deer, take to processor.
Find people to whom to give the cut, wrapped and frozen meat.
Actually, I have found there is an animal that should be skun, quartered and placed in ice box, on ice and held at least 3 days to clear out some flavors.
This is a feral pig, sows and others under 100lb live weight are fine done this way.,really need to leave boars over 100 lb to make more little pigs.
Feral pigs make really good smoked sausage.



Print Page | Close Window