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Basilicata Sfogliata Anchovy Bread

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: Europe
Forum Name: Italy
Forum Discription: From the northern snow-covered Alps to the hot southern beaches of Apulia, Italy’s regions encompass everything good.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=2667
Printed Date: 27 February 2021 at 17:48


Topic: Basilicata Sfogliata Anchovy Bread
Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Subject: Basilicata Sfogliata Anchovy Bread
Date Posted: 08 October 2012 at 07:59
Photo Credit: http://www.abreadaday.com/?p=2249" rel="nofollow - http://www.abreadaday.com/?p=2249
 
Sfogliata - Matera.
 
Matera, Basilicata historic district.
 
Anchovy Pastries:
Photo Courtesy: http://www.rusticocooking.com" rel="nofollow - www.rusticocooking.com
 
 
 
 
 
*** Sfogliata is paired with pastas with meatballs and stews with potatoes.
 
MATERA, BASILICATA ...
 
One of the highlights of Basilicata in southeast Italy, neighboring Puglia to the west, is Basilicata. Sfogliata is a rolled bread filled with Extra Virgin Olive Oil and scented with pugent anchovies, wild fresh mountain orégano and ground fresh Senise peppers. It is like chowing down on a layered Napolean Pizza, numerous layers of friable dough filled with exhuberant flavours.
 
Matera, the capital of Basilicata is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Boutique Hotel Locanda di San Martino, is tucked into the Sassi District in the centre of the small well kept picturesque town. Sassi means stones.
 
This story begins as all great stories do, and on a starless sky, dark and stormy rainy evening, the down pour from Gargano, most of the driving was done on stones, and in fact they were everywhere, under the wheels of the Jeep, leading to all the townhomes and just about all over.
 
Dorothy Zinn, and her husband Antonio had reformed and renovated actual cave dwellings and a very special Hotel called The Shell, La Conchiglia, with terra cotta flooring, marine fossils embedded in the wall treatments, and ancient niches and nooks.
 
Trattoria Lucanerie, a lovely restaurant, a stroll from the Hotel, run by Franco Abbondanza, a huge antipasti awaiting us and of course a bottle of wine. The dishes included: succulent divine eggplant rolls filled with Ricotta, sprinkled with herbs & Parmesano, semolina breads, with a dense chewy crumb and a Salame, home made by Enza´s mother. Enza Leone, is Franco´s cousin. Of course, there were  Senise,  is a well known pepper which grows in the Basilicata region & the brittle crisp crust of Sfogliata.
 
Here is Trattoria Lucanerie´s Recipe ...
 
Basilicata Sfogliata Anchovy Bread ...
 
Photo Credit: http://www.abreadaday.com/?p=2249" rel="nofollow - http://www.abreadaday.com/?p=2249
 
(1) FOR SEASONED OIL
 
1/3 cup Evoo
1 tblsp. sweet Hungarian Paprika
1 tblsp. minced fresh orégano
4 flat anchovy filets drained, patted dry & minced
1/8 tsp salt
 
(2) THE DOUGH
 
3/4 cups water 105 degrees farenehiet to 115 degrees farenh.
2 tsps. active dry yeast from a 1/4 oz. package
1 cup 00 Flour
1 cup Semolina Flour
1 tsp. salt
 
MAKE DOUGH ...
 
Stir together the water and the yeast in small bowl until yeast is dissolved and let stand until foamy, for approx. 5 mins. ( if it does not foam, re-begin. )
 
Stir the Evoo into yeast mixture and pulse 00 flour, Semolina & salt in food processor until well combined.
 
With motor running, pour in  yeast mixture and process until a wet dough forms. Transfer the dough from the bowl to a lightly floured surface and knead gently a few times until smooth.
 
Form dough into a oval ball and transfer to a large oiled bowl, turning to coat. Cover the bowl loosely with plastic wrap, and a kitchen towel.
 
Let dough rise in draft free place at warm room temperature until doubled in size for 1 to 1.5 hours.
 
SEASONED OIL ...
 
Combine all the Evoo ingredients together in small bowl thoroughly.
 
FORM AND BAKE ...
 
1) lightly oil an 8 inch square baking pan
2) turn dough onto floured surface and knead a few times to remove air
3) roll out dough on well floured surface into an 18 inch round - 1/8 inch thick
4) reserve 1 tblsp seasoned Oil and with brush, leave a 1/4 inch border around edge
5) tightly roll up the dough, like a jelly roll and pinch seam to seal
6) arrange roll seam side down and form into coil, then place in oiled baking pan
7) gently press the coil to flatten just slightly and cover pan with loosely with plastic wrap and kitchen towel
8) let rise 1 hour in warm place
9) put in middle position in preheated oven of 375 farenh. degrees and brush top of dough with reserved seasoned oil and bake 40 mins.
10) cool completely on rack and with metal spatula, lift bread cautiously and let cool 1 hour.
 
SERVE WITH ANTIPASTI, SALADS, CHEESES, EVOO & SEA SALT OR CHARCUTERIE ... ENJOY.
 
Ciao.
Margi.
 
 
 


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.



Replies:
Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 09 October 2012 at 09:40
i would LOVE to try this - and come to think of it, i believe i have everything, including the semolina....

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Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 09 October 2012 at 09:45
Tas,
 
Wow, thanks so much for the compliments.
 
It is quite delicious. I have a very large photo of it, which as you know reduction of photos is still quite a task for me, so I shall send it to you for this post via email.
 
I am truly pleased that you would like to prepare this very lovely savoury pastry crisp bread filled with anchovies. One can also fill it with Olives and Onions, or like a Calzone, with cheese & eggplant or deli meats.
 
All my kindest.
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 09 October 2012 at 09:48
well, like i said, i'd lone to TRY making it - but would i be successful? who knows? Embarrassed
 
it does indeed look and sound good, though - when you send the picture, i'll get a better idea of how it looks visually....


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Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 21 October 2012 at 03:56
Tas,
 
Photos up. Thanks.
 
Let me know when you do prepare it and I look forward to hearing all about your baking.
 
Kindest.
Margi.
 
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 22 October 2012 at 11:13
It sure looks good, Margi -
 
I'll see if I can do this one next weekend and serve it with some sort of Italian dinner....


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Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 22 October 2012 at 11:17
Tas,
 
There are uncountable simple pastas in the Italy Section that would be lovely, as well as the NYC New England section and the Californian. I would go with a Fettuccini Alfredo or a Carbonara, which are so simple to prepare and so few ingredients.
 
Also, a baked ziti perhaps and it is always good for leftovers.
 
I look forward to seeing your writeup and pictorial on it.
 
Kindest. Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 22 October 2012 at 11:35

Something along the lines of fettuccine Alfredo would be just right, I think - I was thinking perhaps a garlicky "quatro formaggio" sauce with shrimp and perhaps crab over capellini.



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Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 22 October 2012 at 13:22
Good Evening Tas,
 
 
Fettuccini Alfredo would work lovely howver, this is a Roma based dish and the bread is a Basilicata specialty thus you might opt for a Southern Italian pasta ...
Shrimp Scampi would be wonderful .
I can send a list of Basilicata pastas however off the top of my think tank:  tiny meatballs with a light Marinara sauce shall be lovely, and u can see, the dishes are quite similar to Puglia. This is the land of Eggplant, Tomatoes, wine and olives.
 
Basilicata is heavily forested however, has a short coast line ( 13 or 14 km. ) and thus, anchovies, sardines, and many similarities to Sicilia and Puglia ... Peppers and chili peps, important crop ...
 
Kindest and See Photo on Thread Page 1, where I posted a pasta dish, orricchetti with tiny meatballs and tomato sauce ... These are called Little Ears ...
I am on Cell android now. Margi.

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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 23 October 2012 at 10:42
Tas,
 
Basilicata is the land of peppers, chili peppers and honey. Some of the sauces, my LA CUCINA CULINARIA ITALIA suggest in its history are:
1) rigate pene all arrabbitata
2) pollo alla potenza ( garlic, evoo, onion, white wine, pecorino / reggiano, butter, 1 chili pepper, basil, parsley, salt and freshly ground blk. pepper): prepared in a large skillet without cover
3) Calabrese, Mora, Siciliana, Cinta Senese, Large White or Caseriana Pork ( names of pig breeds )
a) pork stew called: SPEZZANTINO DI MAIALE ( large pork chunks, rosemary, 1 chili pep., salt and pepper,  red bell and green bell, fresh tomatoes, garlic 3 cloves and prepared in earthenware ).
4) BREADS: acquasale & pancotto
5) LAMB
6) CHEESES
7) HONEY - 12 types
8) GREEK STYLE WINES
9) LICORES
 
So, with this in mind, perhaps, a baked pasta, of Mrs. Tas with a pork filling and bechamel on top.
 
Kindest. Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 23 October 2012 at 13:09
we shall see, but mrs. tas really likes her seafood with quattro formaggio! lol

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Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 23 October 2012 at 13:26
Tas. Sounds delicious too. Enjoy. I look forward to seeing the heavenly bread. Kindest. Margi

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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 11:07
Awesome Margi! You have no idea how long I've been looking for something like this lol.

My family makes something very similar to this which is heavier on the paprika, includes some hot pepper, and with no anchovies. Of course, I also understand that my Grandfather dropped some ingredients he didn't care for but he never said what it was his Grandmother and Grandfather used that he opted not to. So I've been trying to find a more traditional recipe for comparison Smile

Ours is rolled and coiled like the above, but looser so the sides aren't touching. We also called it (and I might be off on the spelling, going off how it sounds) vallia. Not sure if it's a regional variation, my family hails from San Costantino Albanese in the Potenza region of Basilicata, or if 3/4 of a century in the US watered it down a bit...certainly sounds a bit similar when I say it aloud. Looks like you may have gotten me on the right track, and helped me find a new forum to play on LOL


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 13:55

Buonasera Lupinus ( Dan ),

 
Firstly, I am very pleased that you have arrived at our Forum.
 
After, some research on several Basilicata websites, and with Two Italian Gents who have a BBC TV Programme called TWO GREEDY ITALIANS, Antonio & Gennaro, who have travelled all over Italia, and have filmed their visits to farms, restaurants, trattorias, shepherds´ pastoral lands, deli shops with eight tables, amongst other food establishments and where food is grown; the name Vallia does not seem to turn up neither in:  The Oxford Companion to Italian Food nor the Italian Forums I am a member of ( http://www.barilla.com" rel="nofollow - www.barilla.com ) amongst others.
 
I believe it can be spelt incorrectly or classified as a Pastry perhaps ?  Could it be spelt with a "B" verses a "V" ?
 
Here are some websites, which maybe of some assistance:
 
http://www.barilla.com" rel="nofollow - www.barilla.com ( in English and Italian )
 
http://www.delallo.com" rel="nofollow - www.delallo.com ( in English )
 
http://www.discoverbasilicata.com" rel="nofollow - www.discoverbasilicata.com  ( in English )
 
http://www.deliciousitaly.com" rel="nofollow - www.deliciousitaly.com ( in English )
 
http://www.rusticocooking.com" rel="nofollow - www.rusticocooking.com ( in English )
 
I also highly recommend the following contacting Pastry Chef Salvatore De Riso, who was chosen as the Best Pastry Chef of Italy in Campania; in the Amalfi Coast.
 
In the meantime, I am going to post the fabulous book selection, of Gennaro and Antonio, who are now also co-owners of several U.K. restaurants, and have filmed numerous works on the regional cuisines of Italia. They would know.
 
This data and information shall be in the Library.
 
I have lots of books on Italian regional cuisine, so I am sure we shall find the correct name. I am also going to email my friend Giacinto in Basilicata this evening as well as a dear colleague member and friend & fellow author, from Lombardia; Luca.
 
Kind regards and welcome to FOTW,
Margi.    


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 14:16
Margi, thanks so much for looking and for the links.

Unfortunately, I've no idea really if I spelled it correctly. I'm just going by how my Grandfather always said it, Val-ya. It does sound kind of similar when I say it aloud (and the recipe and look certainly is) that maybe sfogliata would have been the original annunciation and it just fell to the mercies of American Italian styling. Lord knows it wouldn't be the first time or dish that's happened to. And my Grandfather never picked up much Italian beyond some basic phrases as his father rarely spoke it in the home. So wouldn't surprise me if his annunciation was a bit off.

I've done quite a bit of searching as the mood has struck and this one is the closest, and from the right region. So I think this is what I've been looking for.

Now if only I could find some Senise Peppers lol. I haven't had them since I was little, but my great Grandfather grew them and had them hanging all over the place. Can't even find the seeds and I doubt buying whole ones over the internet would give me viable seeds.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 14:33
Photo: Anchovy Bread.
 
Did it look like this by chance ?
 
 
 
 
Matera, Basilicata Church.
 
 
Photo: Basilicata Chili Peppers.
 


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 14:37
Nope, almost exactly like the picture in your initial post.

Only difference in the forming was that it looks like after it was placed on the pan, it was coiled in such a way that the sides were touching. Ours is placed on the pan and coiled so the sides weren't touching. Probably an even lesser variation than the lack of anchovies, which probably has a lot to do with my Grandfather hated the things.

Oh, and yep those be the peppers.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 14:57
Lupinus,
 
http://www.academiabarilla.com" rel="nofollow - www.academiabarilla.com  
 
The Barilla Academy has 10 pages of Breads. I believe you have a good chance of finding it there.
 
I had already sent an email to my friend Giacinto who was born and raised in Matera and would probably know.
 
Okay, got the description.
 
Until tomorrow.
Have nice evening,
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 15:02
That's for the link, and thanks for emailing the friend that's awesome.

I should be able to kill at least a few hours with that link.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 15:14
Lupinus,
 
I have also contacted Fotw Member Luca, and I am sure, he shall take a look at the Post first thing in the morning as he lives in Italia.
 
I am sure I shall hear from my friend Giacinto from Matera, tomorrow or Monday.
 
Furthermore, I have written the Press Department of http://www.antonio-carluccio.com" rel="nofollow - www.antonio-carluccio.com  ( see Library Section ) as I am absolutely positive that Antonio and Gennaro know, as they have done a T.V. Programme on Basilicata and Puglia.
 
There are uncountable Pane Casereccio which translates to: Homemade Baked Breads.    
 
Have lovely Sunday. It is 23.15 hours here in Madrid Capital,
 
Margi.
 


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 15:56
12am Sunday Morning.
 
Dan,
 
I believe it is Sfilatino which is a bread roll, meaning the rolling of the dough, which is how my original recipe is prepared. Of course, stuffings vary considerably from savoury to sweet.  
 
I am going to do further research in Italian and see if I can now find a photo of this genre.
 
Sorry, the other, was  just a baguette style Italian bread.  
 
Margi.  


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 16:01
Awesome Margi, thanks


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 16:25
Matera, Basilicata.
 
I just realised the bread roll that we are hunting for, is Greek by origin.
 
It is a SFOGLIATA or SFOGLIA  too ... I am almost positive.
 
Is this it, more or less ? ( see photo below ) ...
 
 
 
PHOTO: SFOGLIA MACINATA E PORRI.
 
 
Basilicata if I am not mistaken, like Puglia was Greek occupied during ancient times.
 
These bread rolls can be stuffed with a number of different ingredients.
 
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 17:00
Yep, very similar. Not sure what teh Macinata e porri translates to though? But the Sfoglia sounts right on.

My grandfather used a looser coiling but yep very similar, and I can see the sfoglia very easily morphing into the way we always said it. Being Albanese, this might make even more sense.

You're awesome Smile


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 17:07
Cool Dan,
Grazie. I too, am a curious especially when it comes to Italian epicurism.
 
My pleasure and am truly pleased to have assisted.
 
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 03 November 2012 at 18:46
So I got bored and decided to make a small batch.

I didn't make it 100% from scratch, we typically use good quality pizza or bread dough from a local store. And since I wasn't feeling that adventurous I went with that route.

The anchovies definitely adds an underlying flavor I can't quite put my finger on. It's a good flavor, not fishy, and enough that the difference is noticeable. Just can't describe how exactly. Roasted anchovies maybe? LOL


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 01:22
Dan, Buon Giorno,
 
How did the batch turn out with ? Were you able to take a photo ?
 
Let me move on to answer all your questions:
 
SFOGLIA MACINATA PORRI ...
 
Sfoglia = pastry / according to word reference Italian to English / Note: this might be why we had so much difficulty finding photos and recipes for it.
 
Macinata = to mince, to mill, or to grind.
 
Porri = Leeks.
 
Historically, this traditional Greek origin bread is still made with minced leeks. 
 
Secondly; Salted,  cured and baked; verses roasted  anchovies, the baking process certainly has something to do with the taste, and it is quite a bit different than right out of a tin or can, drained and drizzled with Evoo ( extra virgin olive oil ).
 
I also believe the baking process of the dough into bread or pastries,  also, perhaps the baking surely absorbs alot of the salt.   
 
I believe that now, that you know the name of this bread, and it is Greca ( Greek ) in tradition,  which is how I actually found how I found the photo, that it could be prepared with Greens in the interior and possibly goat or ewe cheese.  
 
After looking at many websites and photos in both Italian and English, I have encountered SFOGLIA OR SFOGLIATA is a stuffed bread, and can be filled with cheese, ham, vegetables and / or sweet fillings. Futhermore, it can be shaped in a variety of forms, and it is a common pastry or bread in Basilicata in all its various forms from traditional to modernization on the original breads.  
 
See photos:  ( Both are Modern Varieties of a bread or pastry with same name SFOGLIA ) ...
 
A modern take on Sfoglia with chocolate filling.   http://www.buttalapasta.it" rel="nofollow - www.buttalapasta.it  
 
 
 
Mushroom filled Sfoglia.
 
 
 
 
In Spain, they also have a bread called Hornazo de Salamanca, which is Stuffed Bread, in translation from Spanish to English.
 
It is prepared with sausage or ham and chopped hard boiled egg in the interior.
 
So each Mediterranean country has a take or slant on a stuffed bread. It is also called Candeal. It is served at Easter time in Castilla León provinces Salamanca and Zamora.
 
 
 
Spanish Hornazo filled with Charcuterie.
 
 
Thanks for ur lovely note.
Kind regards.
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 06:10
Thanks Margi. That's very helpful.

It occurred to me that I think one of the times he mentioned it, he did mention there being spinach...which given his general dislike of cooked greens could have very well been leeks or anything green and leafy that wasn't lettuce LOL. Also possible they couldn't find leeks and so spinach was used I supposed, assuming I remember correctly.

Oh and the batch turned out wonderful. No photos unfortunately.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 06:43
Buonasera Lupinus Dan,
 
Thanks so much for your feedback. 
 
Italians rely alot on " field greens ", sort of arugula, sorrel, escarola to fill their pastas especially in the southern regions, as well as Eggplant, as Basilicata is quite close to Lecce, Puglia, where eggplant or aubergine is their most bountiful crop. They also use green and red peppers of all varieties, as this is the Red & Green & Chili Pepper turf; and  Cavolo, or black cabbage or dragon cabbage. Leeks, fennel and spring onion, with long green stems with 3 hanging onions, are quite common in this zone too. In addition, cheese, from ewe´s milk or goat milk. Very Greek historically.
 
Furthermore, if you are interested; Basilicata is also renowned for their stromboli and calzone too, which I have posted a recipe last weekend, if I am not mistaken.
 
Have lovely Sunday.
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 07:12
Buonasera Magri

Oh I know the love of those greens all to well and use they extensively. My wife hated the things until I started making them for her. Some tomato paste, wine, pine nuts, diavolicchio, maybe some wine soaked raisins if I'm in the mood and I am a happy person.

My Grandfather just wasn't all that fond of cooked greens, only salads, and so it would make sense for them to be removed from the recipe.

And I'll have to look up that calzone recipe, I love making calzone.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 07:19
Buonasera Dan,
 
The versatility of the anchovy bread pastry, is that one can prepare it sweet or savory. The Greeks used alot of field greens with goat milk cheese or ewe milk cheese and they have been wrapping foods since time memorial. This is certainly a classic from the Greek Occupation of both Basilicata and Puglia.
 
Broccoli rabe is another filling that is very popular in Puglia.
 
STROMBOLI and CALZONE: there are 9 pages of recipes and discussions in the Italy Section; so I am sure that you shall find a number of great recipes; and do watch the scales ! LOL
 
Very seasonal: One can also stuff or fill with Boletus or dry mushrooms ... and Charcuterie / Cheese too.
 
It is nice to meet you.  I do highly suggest the http://www.antonio-carluccio.com" rel="nofollow - www.antonio-carluccio.com Books and the Dvd called TWO GREEDY ITALIANS. It is not only the epicurism end of things, it is done wonderfully with a great sense of humor, and is highly enjoyable too. The other very good book on regional Italian, is SILVER SPOON:   http://www.phaidon.com" rel="nofollow - www.phaidon.com
 
All of these books are also available on :  http://www.amazon.com" rel="nofollow - www.amazon.com  
Enjoy, FOTW.
Margi.
 
 


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 07:25
A Basilicata Restaurant in Matera.
 
 
Lupinus,
 
Thought you would enjoy. By the way, have you ever been to Italy ?
 
Kind regards.
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 07:55
Sadly I haven't made it to Italy yet. High on the list though!


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 08:16
Dan,
 
When you do come over to visit our side of the Globe, please do let us know. My husband is a native Italian from Milano, Lombardia and we share our time in between Puglia ( Gargano ) and the Madrid Capital for professional commitments.
 
We can possibly arrange to guide you around a few of the chosen destinations you have, and recommend some wonderful epicurean delights and where you can find them.
 
For dining, do put Bologna, Emilia Romagna at the top of your list.
Kind regards.
Margi.


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Lupinus
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 08:18
Thanks Margi, I may have to take you up on that sometime 


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 04 November 2012 at 08:26
Dan,
 
Of course, I shall also recommend:
1) The Extraordinaire Drive Down The Amalfi Coast of Campania
2) The Trulli Greek Conical White Windmill Looking Buildings in southern Puglia
3) The City of Venice filled with all its enchantment, Verona & the Prosecco Designation of Origin  
4) Florence ( Firenze ) and the Wineries
5) Milan for fashion and Vanguard XXI
6) Roma for the monuments, however, on a personal note: this is not the best dining destination; one must know the hidden treasures and the Borghese Gardens
7) Matera, Basilicata - it is unique to explore on foot, and enjoy the small Mom and Pop bakeries, charcuterie and Sessi, the Stone boutique Hotels and Trattorias.
8) Abruzzi: this is milk fed baby lamb and pastoral dish country
9) Parma: to visit the Museum of Reggiano Parmesano as I am a cheese-a-holic !
10) Modena: the land of Balsamic Vinegar
11) Piedmote Wine Country
 
Have a nice Sunday.
Margi. 


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Percebes
Date Posted: 20 April 2016 at 08:40
What a great post.

I wonder if I could incorporate capers into the fold , if I patted them dry on absorbent paper?


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I am a wine enthusiast. The more wine I drink, the more enthusiastic I become.


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 20 April 2016 at 15:35
Firstly, Capers are grown in Sicily and are commonly used in a pasta called Puttanesca and also with a wide variety of fish with capers & tomato baked dishes ..

You can dry them in the sun on kitchen absorbent paper towelling  and make a tiny bread ! Experiment !!

I have seen them used in Tuna, red pepper and Green pepper stuffed breads similar to a huge rectangle called a GALICIAN EMPANADA, which takes us to Northwestern Iberia on the Atlantic Coast.

Perhaps with this combination, the capers can be quite lovely ..

Have a wonderful spring.

Aplogoies for taking so long to answer.




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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.


Posted By: Kgmg109
Date Posted: 31 March 2020 at 08:37
I know what you are searching for because I have been searching also. It is Valyas and I finally found the recipe.
I wanted to share. I have not tried to make it yet because I just found it last night. https://marioochskitchen.com/an-albanian-tradition/


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 31 March 2020 at 08:50

Kgmg109,

Shall check out the website.

Thank you,
Margaux Cintrano


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Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.



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