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Bacon curing recipes

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: Other Food-Related Topics
Forum Name: Curing of Meats, Charcuterie and Smokehouse Specialties
Forum Discription: From basic sausages and smoked bacon to specialised meat products such as cured hams or other charcuterie, this is the place to discus it!
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=2883
Printed Date: 14 October 2019 at 04:56


Topic: Bacon curing recipes
Posted By: Hoser
Subject: Bacon curing recipes
Date Posted: 12 May 2010 at 05:53

I'll start off with a tried and true recipe here, from Rytek Kutas' book "Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing". I have personally made this recipe and it is outstanding! A bit on the messy side when you are preparing it, but well worth it.

Honey Cured Bacon
 
1 cup kosher salt
 insta-cure number 1
2 cups honey
 
The formula above will cure about one slab of bacon. The insta-cure and salt are mixed together and then rubbed thoroughly into the pork belly.
After rubbing, the honey is poured over the bacon and distributed evenly (the messy part). Put bacon in a large resealable plactic bag, or vacuum seal it if possible. Place the coated bacon in the fridge at 38ºF for six days, turning it and gently kneading it once a day.
 
After 6 days remove the bacon from the cooler and wash it very well with lukewarm water. Let the bacon dry for 30 minutes at room temperature. This is where I differ with Rytek on procedure...he tells you to take it straight to the smoker after drying...I say "do a fry pan test or you'll be sorry"! Cut a piece of bacon and fry it up...check for saltiness. You may want to soak it for an hour os so with a couple of water changes. Now back to Rytek:  Take the bacon to the smoker which has been preheated to 135º and hold it in the smokehouse until it is dry, with the dampers wide open. Dampers are then closed to ¼ open, applying smoke, and held until bacon's internal temp is 127º-128ºF.
Reduce temperatur of smoker to 120º and hold until desired color is obtained. Remove bacon and place in refrigerator overnight before slicing.
Please be sure you use hickory wood for the smoke for this bacon.
 
________________________________________________________________
 

 

There are more recipes to follow....buckboard bacon, Canadian bacon, and perhaps even pancetta...please check back for updates.


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Go ahead...play with your food!



Replies:
Posted By: woodywoodduck
Date Posted: 15 September 2010 at 19:06
Hoser,
 
That Recipe sounds VERY GOOD!
 
Your refering to Rytek Kutas, the Owner (Isn't he Dead?) of the Sausage maker company in Buffalo NY...
I have what is Refered to as "The Bible" that was done by him many years ago...It is loned out right now to my Father-In-Law's Brother..
 
In it, there are many recipes for bacon and I do not remember that 1...
 
What book is that out of?
 
I know of many on another Site who Should take the time and look him up and Read what he has printed..
They have made comments about the Sodium Nitires and Nitrates and that they never use them...I've told all of them more then a few times what can happen if those 2 sodiums are not used when needed, but they pass it off..
 
I REFUSE to make ANYTHING that is going to go into my Smoker without what the Recipe calls from in 1 of the Soudiums!
If I come across a Recipe that does not call for it and calls for smokeing, I will never use it or I add the Sodium to it per the teaspoon per pound of meat!
I Will NEVER Put Family and Friends thru a risk of Food Poisoning from not using it...not using it is gambling with a Bacteria that can have Dreaded Results!
 


Posted By: woodywoodduck
Date Posted: 15 September 2010 at 19:10
You would not happen to have a recipe for Maple Cured Bacon and hams, would you?
 
A Buddy and I are trying to find a Maple Cured Bacon and ham recipe...his Mom and Dad used to raise many hogs per year and made maple cured bacon and hams and sold them at the Broad Street Farmers Market in Harrisburg Pennsylvania.
 
He has looked thru all his Mom and Dad's old recipe books and can not find the maple cured recipe anywhere.
 
I've tried searchs for it thru Google and have yet to come up with a recipe (Yeah watch, you or someone else will find it thru Google in a matter of Seconds!  Always goes that way for me..I can never find it, but let someone else who understands the secrets to Google and they have it in Seconds!)


Posted By: DIYASUB
Date Posted: 15 September 2010 at 20:29
 We're all on the same page, or will be when Woody gets his copy back!
 Hoser, that's a pretty good recipe, I've used it myself on many occassions, and other than changing the variety of the wood chips I used in the smoker I've not seen any reason to change the basic recipe. I've used apple, cherry, hickory, and maple chips and they've all come out pretty good.


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 16 September 2010 at 03:07
Yes indeed Woody...it is the book by the late Rytek. I've always found that bacon recipe to be a very good and simple one. I have made maple cured bacon, but not any ham as yet. For the maple bacon, I simply sustituted maple sugar, and some very thick grade B maple syrup. I'll see if I can dig up the exact recipe and post it for you guys. It's getting to be bacon smoking weather out here in New England.

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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: Boilermaker
Date Posted: 04 December 2010 at 19:12
Where do you get uncured bacon to cure?  Do you guys have access to a butcher?  Wish I did.Cry


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 05 December 2010 at 04:58
You just ask for pork belly Andy....it's getting tougher and tougher to find, but you should be able to special order it if you have to. 

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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 05 December 2010 at 06:35
Hey Andy, go to a smaller local grocery store and talk to the meat man (or lady). They will usually order it for you if they don't have it, as Dave said. Plus once you get to know them, and they learn of your interest in cooking etc, they will square you away on specials, deals and hold back some cuts for you as they sell out. I've also shared some smoking tips and recipes (finishing sauces) with my meat dept folks, as well as taken them all a jar or two of my salsas and they do appreciate it. They love to know how their meats are being used and cooked, plus they give me a heads-up on any specials coming around.

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Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 12 January 2011 at 03:26
Just catching up on some older posts...this was originally posted over at SMF...sorry if you've already seen it.


Well, found myself with a little extra time, pork bellies and butt this morning, so you know what happened.

Bacon times 3 is in the cure





Mixed up some Kosher salt, insta-cure, brown sugar and gave 'em a rub.



Then rubbed one with maple syrup, and the other with molasses, then vacuum sealed and in the fridge at 38 degrees.




Boned out the Butt to the best of my ability, and made the buckboard. Used 1 cup of salt,  1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/4 cup granulated garlic, and 1/3 cup freshly ground coarse black pepper.



I'm kind of anxious to see how the buckboard comes out...my first attempt at that.

I'll update the thread next week, after they're out of the smoker.
OK...two days into the cure, and as far as I can tell, it's doing exactly what it's supposed to do.
Drawing the moisture out of the meat, and creating it's own brine to cure in.
Can hardly wait for Tuesday to smoke em up! <drool>



Bacon update

Okey-dokey
Got the bellies out of the cure, washed them down good and gave it a fry test.



Whoa! waaaay too salty...gave it a one hour soak with three water changes and let the pellicle build overnight...then into the gosm.



Ok...another overnight in the cooler, then out comes the waring pro

Maple syrup cured is looking fine biggrin.gif

Molasses cured is a bit fattier, but ok.


All in all, very tasty bacon...the darker one here is the molasses cured.



Now the buckboard batch is soaking, to be smoked later this morning

I'll do a final update tomorrow, when the buckboard is sliced up and cooked up
Thanks for coming to look.

wink.gifSorry it took so long folks, I know I promised a final update
saturday, but it was just a crazy weekend.

Here is the buckboard, smoked up nicely in about 3 hours...took it to 142 just to be safe wink.gif

I got out the trusty old Waring Pro and got down to business.

And the final test was per the wife...maple syrup cured with eggs and english muffin. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm good.


Lessons learned:
1. After taste testing by family, and a chef friend it was determined that the Maple syrup cure was a clear winner..this will be my go-to recipe from now on with the possibility of some minor modifications.The preferences went as follows:

a. Maple syrup cure
b. Buckboard garlic, sugar and pepper cure.
c. Molasses cure

2. I have to find a way to cut down the salt in the initial cure recipe..wound up soaking one batch over three hours and12 water changes just to get it to where I could choke down the sample fry.
Any suggestions? I only used a cup of salt, but man, was it powerful

3.Don't bother putting pepper in the basic cure...only thing that came through was the garlic and salt when testing the buckboard...more experimentation is warranted ...time to try either pastrami or Canadian bacon.

Thanks for stopping by to check out my Q-View.



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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: got14u
Date Posted: 13 January 2011 at 19:39
I would think a shorter cure time would do well. Maybe inject to get the cure distributed fully but then cut the days in a bag. I'm not sure. I have 2 bellies I need to do and am wondering what recipe to use. I have done ryteks buckboard before and liked it. Maybe your maple not to sure. Oh also is there a reason you have to use so much salt. Maybe just stick with the cure? I don't know but would like to hear your ideas as well. Maybe I will try it out for ya and see the results

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Jerod

Life's hard, it's even harder when your stupid.


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 14 January 2011 at 02:36
Originally posted by got14u got14u wrote:

I would think a shorter cure time would do well. Maybe inject to get the cure distributed fully but then cut the days in a bag. I'm not sure. I have 2 bellies I need to do and am wondering what recipe to use. I have done ryteks buckboard before and liked it. Maybe your maple not to sure. Oh also is there a reason you have to use so much salt. Maybe just stick with the cure? I don't know but would like to hear your ideas as well. Maybe I will try it out for ya and see the results


I just vacuum seal mine and leave them a week Jerod. I never tried injecting slab bacon, I like the way it comes out with  just a rub and a slow cure. The amount of salt is strictly dictated by Rytek's original recipe for honey bacon. I figure you can always soak some of the salt out before you smoke it, but you just can't add any at the last minute.

I do the fry pan test, then if it needs it, give it a good soak with several water changes before letting the pellicle build up.

I also think that the vacuum sealer may be the main reason for the saltiness...since the vacuum actually pulls the salt into the meat, rather than being next to it and just wrapped up. I think next time I will indeed cut back the salt before vacuuming and see how it turns out.


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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 02 February 2012 at 12:30
hey, dave - got a recipe for that maple-cured bacon?

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Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 02 February 2012 at 13:44
All I did Ron, was to substitute brown sugar and maple syrup for the honey in the original recipe.

Made sure I got the salt and cure right, then just sort of eyeballed the brown sugar and syrup. If can can get the actual maple sugar I'm sure it would be even better, but I was unable to find any.
\
Good Luck!Thumbs Up


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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 02 February 2012 at 13:47
i'm thinking hard about trying some buckboard bacon, using a 4-ish-pound boned-out shoulder. if i try it, i'll be using tenderquick, which has salt built in, and i'll see about a combination of brown sugar and maple-syrup or mapleine, which seemed to work pretty well during my canadian bacon experiment.
 
basically, it looks like doing this isn't much more different than the dried beef project that i did - which is pretty dang similar to ham. so then i gotta wonder - what's the difference, other than the body parts involved, between buckboard bacon and ham?


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Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 02 February 2012 at 14:29
Poking around some, it looks like CHEFROB gave a great answer over at http://www.smoked-meat.com/ - www.smoked-meat.com almost a year ago:
 
Quote a couple of years ago i would have said bacon is bacon or bacon is belly. after doing a lot of buckboard i have found that i can produce a bacon from butt that at times most could not tell what part of the pig it came from by butterflying and trimming. if i left it whole i get that "hammieness" that i am not looking for. i don't think you can use a cured and smoked hind quarter, slice it thin and fry it up and think it resembles bacon in any way. with out the fat streaking through it, it can't cook up crisp and give you the same flavor, texture, and mouth feel. i have not done a ham yet but i would venture to say that it can't take on the same amount of smoke as say a belly or butterflied butt due to the surface area vs. non surface area. with this in mind i think bacon tends to take on more characteristics and nuances of the different smokes from different woods as well and is just a plain smokier product. by the same token i feel that this is also what gives ham it's flavor definition by being having more cured meat than surface smoked meat. i think final preparation plays a roll as well as the specific cut involved, but i don't think you can take one of my BBB and stud it with cloves and pineapple rings (i never do this BTW) and pass that off as ham.


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Posted By: Tatoosh
Date Posted: 27 August 2012 at 07:18
Could you give me an idea of the weight of your "slab of bacon"?  Is it in the 3 kilo/6.5 pound area?  A bit heavier or lighter?  I like making bacon, but have only done it a few times.  I smoke mine on a Weber Kettle usually, though I have finished it by heating it until 150F internally in my oven without smoke.  Thank you!


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Mabuhay BBQ & Pizza


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 27 August 2012 at 08:54
hi, tatoosh -
 
hoser will be along to answer your question as soon as possible. i wanted to drop a note welcoming you to the foods of the world forum, and i hope that you find your time here enjoyable ~
 
we're a pretty good crew here, and enjoy sharing what we've learned and learning more from each other. i see you're from the phillipines, and we're looking forward to learning how things are done there.
 
take care, and if you have any questions or concerns, just let us know -
 
ron


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Posted By: Tatoosh
Date Posted: 27 August 2012 at 13:02
Klahowya TakunkaWitko!  I am a US citizen who retired and ran away to the Philippines.  I enjoy some of the cuisine here but also miss some of mine.  My wife, a Filipina from Cebu, loves to cook as well and is taking some culinary courses here in the Philippines.  I am learning to smoke meat and barbecue while helping a brother-in-law who is getting his degree in restaurant management and learning basic culinary skills.  Together we've learned to make bacon, do some sous vide cooking, and turn out some pretty decent old fashioned cranked ice cream.  I hope to introduce him to this website as resource for learning more about the many cuisines found around the world.
 
Thank you for your very nice welcome.


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Mabuhay BBQ & Pizza


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 27 August 2012 at 13:07
It sounds like this might be a good place for your whole family to visit ~ Clap
 
Quite a bit of knowledge here, and we're always hungry for more. We're glad to have you here, and do hope to see more of you!
 
Ron


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Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 27 August 2012 at 13:26
Originally posted by Tatoosh Tatoosh wrote:

Klahowya TakunkaWitko!  I am a US citizen who retired and ran away to the Philippines.  I enjoy some of the cuisine here but also miss some of mine.  My wife, a Filipina from Cebu, loves to cook as well and is taking some culinary courses here in the Philippines.  I am learning to smoke meat and barbecue while helping a brother-in-law who is getting his degree in restaurant management and learning basic culinary skills.  Together we've learned to make bacon, do some sous vide cooking, and turn out some pretty decent old fashioned cranked ice cream.  I hope to introduce him to this website as resource for learning more about the many cuisines found around the world.
 
Thank you for your very nice welcome.


Growing up my neighbors were Filipino. Man I used to love when they'd have BBQ parties. Marinated, thin-sliced short ribs and lumpias were my favorite! MMMM. I'd love to see some of your cooks and recipes.


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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: Tatoosh
Date Posted: 28 August 2012 at 00:15
Hello Pitrow, how is beautiful Newberg?  I had many Filipinos working where I did too and enjoyed their company.  The short ribs sound kind of Korean to me but the lumpia are pure Filipino (well with some influence from the Chinese, of course) and my wife loves to make those and to innovate new ones, her recent lumpia consisted of crab and cream cheese and she often does mashed potato and cheese lumpia. 
 
Later: I saw your blog about doing apple molasses.  That looks really good!  And the cinnamon rolls were nice too.  My wife loves to make those.  How much did they charge for the cured and smoked pork chops?  I do those here, using 1 to 2 inch chops, cured for 2 day in a wet brine and then smoked for 2 or 3 hours with hickory.  Wonderful to eat, but your molasses glaze sounds like a step up the ladder!


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Mabuhay BBQ & Pizza


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 28 August 2012 at 02:51

Originally posted by Tatoosh Tatoosh wrote:

Could you give me an idea of the weight of your "slab of bacon"?  Is it in the 3 kilo/6.5 pound area?  A bit heavier or lighter?  I like making bacon, but have only done it a few times.  I smoke mine on a Weber Kettle usually, though I have finished it by heating it until 150F internally in my oven without smoke.  Thank you!

Hello Tatoosh, and welcome to the forum!Clap
When I prepared the belly bacon above, I had one pork belly and split it into two pieces. I don't know exactly, but would estimate the weight of each piece as about 1.5-2 kilos. 

The weber kettle is a perfect place to smoke bacon...I would start it low and slow and bring it up gradually to that 150°.
Good luck and happy smoking.


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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: Tatoosh
Date Posted: 28 August 2012 at 02:59
Yeah, that is my approach.  I smoke at 150F to 175F (smoker temp) for 3 or more hours.  Then if weather permits, I bring the bacon to 150F internal temperature by raising the smoker to 200F to 230F.  Last time we made bacon it was in a typhoon.  We had blankets hung to protect the Weber from the wind, but I never could get it over 160F smoking temp, so we finished the bacon in the kitchen oven after smoking. 
 
Lots of great recipes here, so I really look forward to exploring the forum and sharing with my family! 


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Mabuhay BBQ & Pizza


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 28 August 2012 at 12:20
Don't worry too much about getting the bacon to an IT of 160 or so...it's cured. It will be fine as long as you cook it before using even if it is cold smoked the whole time.

Here's a good link on bacon curing:
http://www.smoked-meat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7" rel="nofollow - http://www.smoked-meat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7


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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: Tatoosh
Date Posted: 29 August 2012 at 04:07
I only take it to the 150F range because I share it with folks that are over 60 years old (including myself) so I like to be on the safe side.  Thanks for the link.  I am looking it over closely. 


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Mabuhay BBQ & Pizza


Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 30 November 2012 at 15:29
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:


2. I have to find a way to cut down the salt in the initial cure recipe..wound up soaking one batch over three hours and12 water changes just to get it to where I could choke down the sample fry.
Any suggestions? I only used a cup of salt, but man, was it powerful

Thanks for stopping by to check out my Q-View.



  Hi Hoser!

  I'm getting ready to start two whole bellys myself.  My basic cure contains a lot less salts than yours does, and have had no problems with the ratio. 

basic bacon cure recipe

1.One 10lb slab of pork belly, rind removed
2.2 tsp pink salt (Prague Powder)
3.1/2 cup of salt  1/3rd cup salt
4.Generous cup of sugar - maple syrup, honey or brown sugar.

5.Any desired spices

 

 

  Rinse, dry, set on racked sheet in fridge overnight before smoking


Here's a picture of what looks to be a single belly cut into thirds.  The most I ever did at one time was six full bellys...that was too much to do at one time.  Skinning and slicing that much was a pain!



Dan




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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 30 November 2012 at 15:40
Thanks for the suggestion Dan...I think old Rytek's recipe was a bit too heavy on the salt.



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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: PitFiend
Date Posted: 21 March 2013 at 11:42
Has anybody experimented at all with bourbon in the cure? I am attempting a 4lb slab, no rind with a basic maple syrup cure and just adding a shot or two of a decent enough bourbon. It's been in the cure a little over a week and I have been flipping it every day. Just trying to figure out what to expect. 


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 21 March 2013 at 11:46
I tried a Canadian Bacon once using a pork tenderloin that had "bourbon-flavour" in it. It came from the meat plant that way, so I am not sure if it was true bourbon or some sort of artificial "bourbon flavouring."
 
The flavour did add a little something - depth, character, call it what you will. Not sure how to describe it, but it was good!
 
Welcome to the FotW! hope to see you around ~ Beer
 
Ron


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Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 21 March 2013 at 12:17
Very often when bourbon or other whiskey is added it contributes a sense of umami to the finish. You don't taste the booze, as such. But there's an underlying mellowness and all the other ingredients taste more like themselves.

It's simple enough to see how this works. Make your favorite barbecue sauce, adding bourbon (or, better yet, Southern Comfort) to one batch and not to the other. Taste them both, and you'll see the difference.


Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 21 March 2013 at 12:50
Originally posted by PitFiend PitFiend wrote:

Has anybody experimented at all with bourbon in the cure? I am attempting a 4lb slab, no rind with a basic maple syrup cure and just adding a shot or two of a decent enough bourbon. It's been in the cure a little over a week and I have been flipping it every day. Just trying to figure out what to expect. 


   Hello Pitfiend!

  Welcome to FOTW!


   I gotta say...that's one fine idea!  Please post your results when the cure gets done, as I'll probably give this a try next time I make my bacon...and seeing as how the last batch is finished up...it should be within the next few weeks.

    I hope you don't mind me asking, but would you mind cutting off a small piece before you smoke it?  I'd be interested to hear your thoughts of how the simple cure (with Bourbon addition) tasted.  I think it may be helpful to get the flavor profile before smoke and after smoke.

    Can't wait to hear your thoughts! 

   Dan


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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 22 March 2013 at 00:18
I think Brook hit the nail on the head....it will come through in the finished product, but I would not worry about it being overpowering at all. 

I use bourbon in my barbecue sauce, and have used it in many applications...it just seems to give a really nice depth of flavor.



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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: MarkR
Date Posted: 22 March 2013 at 16:24
Bourbon sounds like it would work for me!
I use Ruhlmans recipe for Maple bacon, I also sub Apple Molasses and Honey for the Maple syrup - my favorite!

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Mark R


Posted By: PitFiend
Date Posted: 10 April 2013 at 14:39
Oops, I forgot to check prior to smoking, but as historicfoodie said, it didn't really give the bourbon taste I kind of wanted but did seem to bring some of the maple to the forefront. Pretty tasty overall, but I was really after that hint of bourbon. It cured about 10 days.
Next up is a 5lb slab I just grabbed that I am going to try curing in coffee and see what happens there. I'll try to remember to try it before and after smoking.


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 10 April 2013 at 14:43
PitFiend, you sure do come up with some good ideas! Looking forward to seeing how it goes ~

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Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 10 April 2013 at 19:42
   Thanks for the update pitfriend.  For the coffee, I wonder if adding instant coffee to the rub would offer more flavor than adding some made coffee.

   Can't wait to hear the results!

   Actually, I need to make some more bacon, I'm all out...again!


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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: PitFiend
Date Posted: 11 April 2013 at 13:19
I opted to get a nice dark espresso roast from a place I go to. I am a little hesitant to try an instant coffee since I don't really care for that flavor. Since I am going to be drinking the coffee too, I figured may as well get something I like. I used a pretty basic cure that I have done a couple times and just substituted a couple things.

5lb rind on slab
2oz of kosher salt
1/4 cup brown sugar
About 1/4 cup of really strong brewed coffee
Extra 1tbsp of grounds for good measure
2tsp of all purpose cure

I am going to try to see if I can wait 2 weeks to let the flavor really get in there. I am a big fan of strong flavors, so hopefully this will work out to my liking. Some will be going in to a bacon jam recipe that is already accented with coffee, so it should work out nicely there even if the bacon on its own isn't where I want it to be.


Posted By: tjkoko
Date Posted: 30 May 2013 at 15:32
Originally posted by woodywoodduck woodywoodduck wrote:

You would not happen to have a recipe for Maple Cured Bacon and hams, would you?
 
A Buddy and I are trying to find a Maple Cured Bacon and ham recipe...his Mom and Dad used to raise many hogs per year and made maple cured bacon and hams and sold them at the Broad Street Farmers Market in Harrisburg Pennsylvania.
 
He has looked thru all his Mom and Dad's old recipe books and can not find the maple cured recipe anywhere.
 
I've tried searchs for it thru Google and have yet to come up with a recipe (Yeah watch, you or someone else will find it thru Google in a matter of Seconds!  Always goes that way for me..I can never find it, but let someone else who understands the secrets to Google and they have it in Seconds!)


I cure and smoke bacon regularly and get my http://www.alliedkenco.com/search.aspx?find=maple+sugar+cure" rel="nofollow -


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 30 May 2013 at 16:58
t -

that's great news for me, since i am always trying to find a way to maple cure meats; i think that the maple cured/maple smoked flavour is just about as good as it can get! Pig

i currently have two sections of pork loin curing; since there aren't too many options available to me, i'm using 3/4 cup of genuine maple syrup for each loin section - each section is just over 2 pounds. my curing agent is tenderquick, which i have found to work very well for my needs. i'll be smoking these in maple using my AMNPS. this is an experiment, because i'm not sure if the maple syrup will work. even if it will work, i may or may not have enough, i don't know - but i figure it will be a good learning experience, either way. they're due out of the cure this weekend, so we'll see ~


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Posted By: tjkoko
Date Posted: 30 May 2013 at 17:30
I am not a representative of AlliedKenco.  But they sell everything needed for meat processing, everything ranging from spices, mixtures to equipment.

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A foodie here. I know very little but the little that I know I know quite well.

best,
-T


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 30 May 2013 at 19:27
Sounds good - thanks!

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Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 05 November 2013 at 09:54
  basic bacon cure recipe


1.One 10lb slab of pork belly, rind removed
2.2 teaspoons pink salt (Prague Powder)
3.1/2 cup of salt  1/3rd cup of salt
4.Generous cup of sugar - any of the following...maple syrup, honey or brown sugar.

5.Any desired spices should be mixed with the salt mixture

 

 Mix the salt and pink salt together well.  Rub the salt mixture into, and all over, the meat (all sides).  Next slather the honey, maple syrup or brown sugar (whichever sugar mixture you're using) into the meat as well.  Put in a zip-lock bag (or large tray) and set in the fridge for a week, turning once a day!

   After a week you can remove it from the bag and rinse off the excess salt, then let it soak in cold water for 30 min.  Fry a piece up and taste.   If it's too salty you can soak it in cold water for 15 more minutes before trying another piece.  If it's still too salty soak in cold water for another 15 minute increment, using a fresh batch of cold water. 

  You can now dry it off with paper towels, cook it and eat it like this, or you can smoke it right away, or let it sit on a cooling rack atop a baking sheet in the refrigerator overnight, to form a pellicle. 

   When it's time to smoke I've seen people recommend bringing the smoker temp up to 150, 175 or 200.  If you can't keep your smoker under 225f I wouldn't worry about it.  Just take the belly out once the internal temperature has reached 150f.  To load the smoker with fuel in my BackWood smoker I just put two pieces of lump, lit it with a torch and then placed two pieces of apple wood on top of the lump.  I usually smoke my bacon at 150-160f.

   Next you can let the bacon cool down before proceeding.  Be cautioned...waiting can be difficult and you may end up with burnt fingers.  If this happens simply proceed to lick your fingers of all bacon drippings.  This won't help the burns...but it sure will taste good!

   After the bacon has cooled one degree (I'm kidding!) some people cut the top layer of fat off.  I choose to leave mine on.  You can do whatever you feel like. Cut some strips off, fry up...and enjoy


Here's a picture of what looks to be a single belly cut into thirds.  The most I ever did at one time was six full bellys...that was too much to do at one time.  Skinning and slicing that much was a pain!


  Here's my latest batch.  I prefer just a very simple cure and smoked this batch with Peach Wood and finished with just a bit of Cherry Wood. 







Dan



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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: gracoman
Date Posted: 05 November 2013 at 10:52
Bacon has been on my list for far to long.  Yours looks great.


Posted By: Rod Franklin
Date Posted: 05 November 2013 at 11:00
Every time I buy or use bacon I tell myself again that I need to try to make some.

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Hungry


Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 05 November 2013 at 13:26
Originally posted by gracoman gracoman wrote:

Bacon has been on my list for far to long.  Yours looks great.



Originally posted by Rod Franklin Rod Franklin wrote:

Every time I buy or use bacon I tell myself again that I need to try to make some.




Oh, you guys just have to do it.  Start with one full belly. It will probably be easier to get it with the skin off, but that's up to you and your knife skills.  But I'm thinking if your learning something new already, just get skin off the first time. 

  After you get your belly you can follow the simple instructions for curing a pork belly for bacon, http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/topic3877_post28594.html#28594 - here is my recipe.

   Any questions just ask here and I'm sure one of us will get back to you in a timely manner...it really is worth making your own.  Plus, it's pretty easy...it's just takes a bit of time to do the cure.

   Dan


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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: MarkR
Date Posted: 05 November 2013 at 14:22
Folks I have to call a large word of caution in the recipes I have seen here! According to the package and everything I have ever read on the subject. For cure #1, 1 teaspoon per 5 lbs of meat! This is really important, 1 tablespoon in 5 lbs of meat is dangerous and possibly deadly!
I cannot stress this enough, this is very dangerous!!!

I have seen three posts in this thread listing tablespoons of cure without a reference to meat weight, this is too dangerous to take a chance on someone misunderstanding.


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Mark R


Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 05 November 2013 at 15:15
Originally posted by MarkR MarkR wrote:

Folks I have to call a large word of caution in the recipes I have seen here! According to the package and everything I have ever read on the subject. For cure #1, 1 teaspoon per 5 lbs of meat! This is really important, 1 tablespoon in 5 lbs of meat is dangerous and possibly deadly!
I cannot stress this enough, this is very dangerous!!!

I have seen three posts in this thread listing tablespoons of cure without a reference to meat weight, this is too dangerous to take a chance on someone misunderstanding.
  


That's a real good point Mark, I didn't catch that when I went through the thread.  I'm sure it will get corrected.  I fall into the group of using 1 teaspoon per 5lbs of meat, though I usually phrase it 2 teaspoons in 10lbs (because a common belly will weigh 9-12 lbs.

   Nice catch! 




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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 05 November 2013 at 17:20
I'll be sure to let Dave know so that he can review the recipe, Mark ~ thanks for pointing it out ~

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Posted By: MarkR
Date Posted: 06 November 2013 at 03:38
Dave, this is where you have to be careful with Kutas. There are numerous glaring errors in his use of cure. It is necessary to calculate the amount of cure for yourself, always. And always list it as amount of cure per pound meat. The recipe you reference is for 45 to 50lbs of bacon but someone starting out could easily misunderstand that and use it for 10lbs of bacon. That would not be a good result.
When I post a cure recipe, I list the cure but not the amount used for that reason. It is consistent in being aa #cure to lbs meat ratio.


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Mark R


Posted By: gracoman
Date Posted: 06 November 2013 at 08:05
Here's a couple of very nice recipes:

Lynne’s Breakfast Bacon from Pork Belly


I am working with a fresh 5.25 pound fresh pork belly that already had the rind removed before purchasing.


The spice mix that was used for this batch of breakfast bacon:


NOTE: these measurements are per pound of fresh pork belly.


1T Morton’s Tender Quick curing salt

1 teaspoon dark brown sugar

1 teaspoon granulated garlic

1/2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds

1/4 teaspoon fresh ground or cracked black pepper

1/2 crushed bay leaf


Mix the spices together. The amount and type of spice one uses can vary according to personal tastes but the amount of Morton curing salt should not be altered.


Place the pork belly in a zip lock bag and press the spice mix into all surfaces of the pork belly. Remove as much air as possible from the bag and seal.


Place the pork belly in a fridge that has the temperature set to keep the meat in the range 34 -38 degrees F. Flip the bag over every day for 5 days. You will notice when you flip the bag for the first time that there will now be liquid in the bag, which indicates that the curing process is underway. Do not drain the liquid from the bag, this liquid brine is important to the process.


After 4-1/2 to 5 days remove the pork belly from the bag and rinse well with cold water. Place the pork belly in a large non-reactive container, fill with cold water. Let sit in the fridge for a couple of hours, drain the water and rinse again. Repeat the two hour soak out and rinse at least three more times. This is a total of 8 hours of soak out time, and 4 changes of water.


If your timetable is such that you would rather soak out the bacon overnight (10 or 12 hours), do at least 2 soak and rinse cycles. The soak cycles will remove excess salt, and don't be concerned if the bacon looks slightly pale.


Once the soaking out process is finished, dry surface areas of the pork belly and set it uncovered on a rack in the fridge so the air can flow around the pork belly. This resting time will help equalize the liquids within the meat and also help with the pellicle formation which in turn will help the smoke adhere to the surface of the pork belly. The rest (or equalization) time is a minimum of 8 hours, but can be extended to 24 hours if needed.


Usually I use maple lump and I use cherry wood for the smoking wood.


Insert a thermometer into the thickest part of the pork belly. When the grill temperature is about 140 degrees F the pork belly is put on the grill indirect. The temperature is kept in the 150 – 180 degree range for 2 hours or so and then allowed to creep up to 200 degrees F over the next couple of hours and then to 220 degrees F until the internal temperature of the meat is 150 degrees F. At this point the bacon is removed from the grill.


Allow the bacon to cool overnight in the fridge before slicing.


The next step is storing the finished product. I like to divide it up into small portions and seal it in Food Saver bags before storing in the freezer. The final amount of breakfast bacon was just over 4.25 pounds


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FTP1000’s Maple Cinnamon Bacon

 


It is delicious so don't be shy and give it a whirl. It's sweet with light maple tones, aromatic cinnamon kick and excellent salt balance. 



Ingredients: 


All measurements are per pound of  meat


- Pork Belly

- 2 tsp per lb Morton Tender Quick

- 25 ml per lb pure Maple sugar 

- 1/4 tsp per lb ground black pepper

- 1 tsp per lb crushed Fenugreek seeds

- 1/2 cinnamon stick per lb ground (2 - 2 1/2 inch piece)


- Mix everything together then rub it on the pork belly evenly on all sides. Place it in a large ziplock bag and allow to cure in fridge for 5 days between 36F - 40F. Turn over once each day.


- After 5 full days rinse thoroughly and soak in clean cold water for 15 minutes, remove and pat dry with paper towels.


- Place pork belly in the fridge uncovered on a rack and allow to dry overnight for an equalization period and to allow pellicle formation.


- Smoke with your choice of woods for a minimum of 4 hrs until 145F internal temperature at the thickest part. I usually  

smoke at 160 - 170 F for the first few hrs then ramp up to 200F or so to finish. My wood choices are usually hickory for the first 2 to 3 hrs then switch to apple, cherry or maple to finish for excellent rich color.




Posted By: MarkR
Date Posted: 06 November 2013 at 13:21
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:


Lessons learned:
1. After taste testing by family, and a chef friend it was determined that the Maple syrup cure was a clear winner..this will be my go-to recipe from now on with the possibility of some minor modifications.The preferences went as follows:

a. Maple syrup cure
b. Buckboard garlic, sugar and pepper cure.
c. Molasses cure

2. I have to find a way to cut down the salt in the initial cure recipe..wound up soaking one batch over three hours and12 water changes just to get it to where I could choke down the sample fry.
Any suggestions? I only used a cup of salt, but man, was it powerful

3.Don't bother putting pepper in the basic cure...only thing that came through was the garlic and salt when testing the buckboard...more experimentation is warranted ...time to try either pastrami or Canadian bacon.

Thanks for stopping by to check out my Q-View.


Dave the reason your bacon is so salty is that you are using the ingredients for probably 5 slabs of bacon on one slab. All of the amounts are for about 45 to 50lbs of bacon. Luckily you rinsed the stuffing out of it as that is enough cure for 45 to 50 lbs. Yes I make maple cured bacon, I will post my recipe if you wish. I have never had a problem with salt. I have never had to rinse my bacon.
Oh what the...
Maple Cured Bacon
Pork belly 5lbs
Sea Salt 57.14g
brown sugar 50g
Maple Syrup59.11g
white wine (carrier) 130g
cure #1 the appropriate amount. (at 1 tsp (5.714g) per 5 lbs)
I'm not listing the amount of cure #1 so you have to calculate it for the weight of meat.


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Mark R


Posted By: MarkR
Date Posted: 07 November 2013 at 10:36
Ok, in Hoser's defense - He is using what should  be a tried and true recipe, except for a few things. This recipe is in the last edition (4th) published in 2008. Rytek died in 1996 and this recipe was not in HIS book when he died, only the last edition. It is not in the first edition as I have that also. In looking at the recipe, Kutas always listed the amount of meat at the top of HIS recipes, usually in 100 and 25lb versions. That is not present here. The recipe is not complete in comparison to Kutas's other recipes. It looks to me that some of the title information is missing and a few paragraphs in the method.
My best guess is that this was for 5 bellies or 45  to 50lbs. These would be stacked on top of each other, wrapped in plastic then refrigerated for the curing time period. My best guess.
This is not one of Rytek's recipes, something added later by...someone else incomplete.
Still there are errors in Rytek's recipes in cure amounts. Cures changed over the period of time he published (1976 to 1996 to present) and the book did not always keep up. You can find reference to that in the end of preamble in Edition 4.  There are also four different % of nitrite cures available on the market - 5%, 6%, 6.5% and 7% (not including TQ). You really have to read and follow the cure package instructions, not the recipe. You have to calculate the cure for yourself to be safe.

Dave it was not my intention to attack or offend you in any way, if I have done so I apologize! You, Sir are a damn fine cook and I would dive into any other thing I have ever seen come out of your kitchen.


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Mark R


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 09 November 2013 at 03:46
Mark....no offense taken believe me, and after re-reading Rytek's recipe several times I have to agree that it must have been a misprint that the editors did not catch. Pretty sloppy editing in my opinion. Let's just say that one should always...always weigh the meat carefully and compute the cure for each recipe as you go.

The original post has been edited to delete the amounts used...we'll let future readers learn and measure their own.


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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: BriCan
Date Posted: 21 August 2014 at 23:41
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:

2. I have to find a way to cut down the salt in the initial cure recipe..wound up soaking one batch over three hours and12 water changes just to get it to where I could choke down the sample fry.
Any suggestions? I only used a cup of salt, but man, was it powerful


For what its worth weigh the bacon/meat and use 20gm salt per kg of meat and you can leave a month of sundays and it will still taste great Smile


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But what do I know


Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 10 March 2015 at 14:21
Originally posted by BriCan BriCan wrote:

 

For what its worth weigh the bacon/meat and use 20gm salt per kg of meat and you can leave a month of sundays and it will still taste great Smile

  I'll start giving that a try Brican...thanks for the tip


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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: Thecueman
Date Posted: 24 March 2016 at 14:10
For Atlanta folks I sometimes get my pork belly (uncured bacon)  at the Buford Hwy Farmers Market in Norcross.

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Simply Al


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 24 March 2016 at 16:34
Hi, Thecueman - Welcome to the FotW Forum, and thanks for providing this information!

Feel free to drop into the New Members' Lounge and introduce yourself, if you would like!


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