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Ideas for Home-Made "CheriYaki" Sauce

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: Food Groups
Forum Name: Fats, Oils, Sauces, Sweets and Condiments
Forum Discription: Used in moderation, these components can make a good dish into a great work of art.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=3458
Printed Date: 17 January 2018 at 07:55


Topic: Ideas for Home-Made "CheriYaki" Sauce
Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Subject: Ideas for Home-Made "CheriYaki" Sauce
Date Posted: 12 April 2013 at 10:40

The Beautiful Mrs. Tas isn't a very big fan of many things when it comes to barbecue - she normally takes it as it comes, and it's either "OK," or she doesn't like it - there isn't much middle ground.

But one thng she really does like, is something that is available locally, called "CheriYaki" sauce. Naturally, it's based on teriyaki sauce, and also has a nice, prominent shot of cherry in it, with a little more garlic than normal teriyaki sauce. I am sure that some of you are familiar with it, and it is available on Amazon.com, if anyone is interested in trying it:

http://www.amazon.com/World-Harbors-Cheriyaki-16-Ounce-Bottles/dp/B001EO5YO8/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top" rel="nofollow - http://www.amazon.com/World-Harbors-Cheriyaki-16-Ounce-Bottles/dp/B001EO5YO8/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

It's quite tasty, and extremely versatile; We've had it on beef, pork, chicken, fish, hamburgers, hot dogs, venison - you name it, and it will probably go good with CheriYaki. It works very well as a marinade, baste or dipping sauce.

The problem with it, though, is that it is, well...store-bought, which means that, like many store-bought things, it suffers from a lot of artificial ingredients and/or food additives, as well as an abundance of "filler," in this case, sugar. I want to come up with a home-made CheriYaki sauce for her.

My first instinct is to make a home-made teriyaki sauce; I have  http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/gyuniku-teriyaki_topic768.html" rel="nofollow - a good, tried-and-true, reliable recipe , and http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/salmon-teriyaki_topic2847.html" rel="nofollow - so does Dave - and I can add a little extra garlic to either if necessary, so that part is covered.

The issue, then, is adding the cherry. I'm thinking that cherry juice, reduced to double-strength or possibly even to "molasses" might do the trick. Combine the two at a 50/50 ratio, thickening it as necessary, and then see what we have. From there, I can adjust the ratio.

Another option might be Cherry jam or preserves, with teriyaki sauce.

First question - has anyone made anything similar? if so, would you care to share the recipe?

Second question - if not, does it at least sound as if I am on the right track?

Any feedback, ideas, discussion etc. is most welcome.

Thanks in advance -

Ron



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Replies:
Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 12 April 2013 at 10:56
http://www.citrusandcandy.com" rel="nofollow -
 
TAS,
 
 
www.citrusandcandy.com
 
I had done a Mini Search for Cherry Glazed Roast Duckling ... This recipe for a cherry salsa glaze sounds wonderful:
 
Lea and Perrins
Maltose
Honey
Port Wine
Balsamic Vinegar
Fresh Cherries or Cherry Preserves
 
 
Hope this assists,
Margaux.


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www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 12 April 2013 at 11:27
That looks like a nice sauce or glaze on its own, Margi - but I'm worried that it might take over or otherwise conflict with the interaction between the cherries and the teriyaki. I'm just guessing here, since sauces etc. are something that I don't mess with much - I normally have a few that I make, that have worked in the past, or I have some that I buy and sometimes improvise/modify.

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Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 12 April 2013 at 16:02
Knowing Mrs. Tas's aversion to spicy Ron, I think if I were going to try it I would go with my basic teriyaki sauce and substitute Kirsch liqueur for the sriracha sauce, and up the volume quite a bit. I use Kirsch occasionally with mussels or clams and it works quite nicely....not sure that it would give you all the cherry flavor your looking for though.

Dried cherries might work quite nicely as well.


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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 12 April 2013 at 19:23
My 2 pence: Heat teriyaki sauce of your choice. Then start adding cherry preserves slowly, maybe a teaspoon at time, until reaching the taste profile you prefer.

If necessary, chop the cherries finely before adding to the sauce.


Posted By: Sandy
Date Posted: 06 January 2018 at 13:47
I make a CheriYaki sauce, that's really yummy!!!!
I use it on pork, which makes it taste like Chinese boneless spareribs, but better.

In a sauce pan heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil
Add 5 cloves of chopped garlic, stirring quickly, before garlic browns
add a Jar of Polander all fruit cherry, (or similar) mixing until it melts into a sauce
add 1/4 cup of regular soy sauce and 1/4 cup of sweet soy sauce
add salt and pepper to taste.

I then marinate the raw meat in the sauce, before BBQing.
You can also return the marinade to the saucepan, 
*** make sure to bring the marinade to a low boil and simmer for a few minutes!!!!!
then you can use it again as a glaze to top the cooked meat.




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Sandy


Posted By: Melissa Mead
Date Posted: 06 January 2018 at 18:14
Yum!

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Melissa

http://carpelibris.wordpress.com/ - http://carpelibris.wordpress.com/



Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 07 January 2018 at 04:47
Ron,

There are non alcoholic cherry liquors too ..   However, I love the idea of Kirsch Transparent Alsace Brandy ..

And dried cherries as cherries are not in season at the momento ( January ) ..

Here the harvest is  31 / 3 March - mid April depending on climate in La Vera,  Extremadura which is our cherry appellation ..

Good luck ..  It sounds delicious  !!  i do agree with Hoser in regards to the spice factor and with Historic  Foodie about using Cherry  preserves ..  




 


-------------
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 11 January 2018 at 10:09
Originally posted by Sandy Sandy wrote:

I make a CheriYaki sauce, that's really yummy!!!!
I use it on pork, which makes it taste like Chinese boneless spareribs, but better.

In a sauce pan heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil
Add 5 cloves of chopped garlic, stirring quickly, before garlic browns
add a Jar of Polander all fruit cherry, (or similar) mixing until it melts into a sauce
add 1/4 cup of regular soy sauce and 1/4 cup of sweet soy sauce
add salt and pepper to taste.

I then marinate the raw meat in the sauce, before BBQing.
You can also return the marinade to the saucepan, 
*** make sure to bring the marinade to a low boil and simmer for a few minutes!!!!!
then you can use it again as a glaze to top the cooked meat.




This looks like it would be very good - thank you, Sandy!

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Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 11 January 2018 at 10:11
Originally posted by Margi Cintrano Margi Cintrano wrote:

Ron,

There are non alcoholic cherry liquors too ..   However, I love the idea of Kirsch Transparent Alsace Brandy ..

And dried cherries as cherries are not in season at the momento ( January ) ..

Here the harvest is  31 / 3 March - mid April depending on climate in La Vera,  Extremadura which is our cherry appellation ..

Good luck ..  It sounds delicious  !!  i do agree with Hoser in regards to the spice factor and with Historic  Foodie about using Cherry  preserves ..  


Thanks, MArgi - I need to find some true kirsch...the closest thing available around here is "Mr Boston" Cherry brandy....probably not quite the same.

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