Print Page | Close Window

Stroopwafels

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: Europe
Forum Name: The Low Countries
Forum Discription: Belgium and the Netherlands.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=4672
Printed Date: 25 September 2017 at 05:25


Topic: Stroopwafels
Posted By: gracoman
Subject: Stroopwafels
Date Posted: 11 September 2016 at 18:29
I love these things and always pick some up when lucky enough to find them which isn't often. There are dedicated stroopwafel wafel makers on the market but I recently discovered my waffle cone maker can be used as a substitute so game on.

Make a sweet, buttery, stiff yeasted dough and let it rise for 45 minutes or so to begin constructing this world famous cookie.
http://s1293.photobucket.com/user/gracoman/media/A%20stiff%20dough_zpsocefrc6s.jpg.html">

While the dough is resting make the filling.  This can be made with treacle, golden syrup, or mild molasses if you are going that route.  The other popular option is caramel.  I mixed mild molasses with corn syrup to lighten the flavor a bit because I like all things molasses. Sorry, no pics of that Cry

Heat up the waffle cone maker and start pumping out the cookies.  Each waffle take between 40 and fifty seconds to complete so it goes pretty fast.  Remove the finished waffel and cut with a pastry round before spliting it in half while they are still warm.  They harden as they cool so you must work quickly.  Add a dollop of cooled filling, close them up and let them harden.
http://s1293.photobucket.com/user/gracoman/media/Waffle%20Cone%20Maker_zpsj3bvxotn.jpg.html">

The traditional way to serve these cookies in over a hot beverage.  Coffee, teas, hot chocolate are all contenders.   I'm a coffee guy so there is no contest here.  The hot coffee steams the cookie and softens the thin gooey sweet filling.  It return, the cookie keeps the coffee hot.  Its is a wonderful idea and makes for quite a nice breakfast treat.
http://s1293.photobucket.com/user/gracoman/media/Stroop%20Wafel%20is%20Served_zpscnlnfnfn.jpg.html">

Mmmmmm.... Stroopwafels!!!


 



Replies:
Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 12 September 2016 at 09:40
yum! I need to try my hand at making these someday, but usually I just buy them since they're pretty easy to find around here. Nice work! 

-------------
Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: gracoman
Date Posted: 13 September 2016 at 16:02
I wish they were as easy to find around my neck of the woods.  I'm lucky to find them at all.

I was able to get the hang of splitting the finished wafels in two after a while but I never did get used to the heat.  I didn't actually burn the hand that held and spun them but it was a bit raw by the time I made a dozen of these things.  Then after going through all of that.... >poof<.... they were gone leaving me with only a raw handed sticky memory.

After making this trial batch I think I'll leave it to the professionals.   Unless....  


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 14 September 2016 at 08:32
G-man,

Would a serrated bread knife help? Seems you could likely let them cool a bit before cutting???



-------------
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 14 September 2016 at 09:58
Originally posted by gracoman gracoman wrote:

I wish they were as easy to find around my neck of the woods.  I'm lucky to find them at all.

I was able to get the hang of splitting the finished wafels in two after a while but I never did get used to the heat.  I didn't actually burn the hand that held and spun them but it was a bit raw by the time I made a dozen of these things.  Then after going through all of that.... >poof<.... they were gone leaving me with only a raw handed sticky memory.

After making this trial batch I think I'll leave it to the professionals.   Unless....  


yeah, I think the only reason they're fairly easy to find around here is we have a large population of Dutch immigrants so you'll often see them in the mom & pop general stores in the smaller towns. None of the big box places would ever have them.

My aunt spent some time perfecting a recipe for them but I think, like you found, they're just too much trouble to make very often. Seems like she makes them about every third or fourth Christmas now and gives them out as gifts.


-------------
Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 14 September 2016 at 10:02
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

G-man,

Would a serrated bread knife help? Seems you could likely let them cool a bit before cutting???



if you watch this video at about the 1 minute mark he uses what looks like a paint scraper to cut it. I wonder if that might not be the trick.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMaQH-uh4Z4


-------------
Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: gracoman
Date Posted: 14 September 2016 at 19:31
After watching many vids and reading multiple recipes I had a pretty good idea this was going to take a bit of practice.  First time out I laid out several different knives to grab in case whatever I started with didn't work out.  I started with a freshly sharpened pairing knife, tried a serrated and went back to the pairing knife. 

The wafels must be cut while they are hot.  They become more and more brittle as they cool until finally cutting them is impossible.  They would just shatter when cooled so hot hand was the order of the day.

I watched the "paint scraper" vid and the thing almost sliced itself in half.  So I re watched several other videos and It looks to me like my waffle cone make is probably the culprit.  My cone maker wafels are thinner than the dedicated stroopwafel maker's are.  There is quite a difference and I can see how the thicker one's would me much easier to deal with.  So even though many recipes say a waffle cone maker is a good substitute I think that's a bit of a stretch.  Fair substitute possibly, as it is possible to make them, but if you look at the picture of my finished stroopwafel it is not cooked as evenly either.  That may just be from me not using a higher temperature setting but the thinness isn't going away.  Slicing them in half was the most difficult part of the process and I ruined a few.


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 15 September 2016 at 12:02
One of the videos I watched yesterday said (in Dutch) that they didn't bother cutting them in half and just used two waffles. might be a better approach especially with the thinner ones from the waffle cone maker


-------------
Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: crustyo44
Date Posted: 26 November 2016 at 21:58
The stroopwafels are cut in halve when hot with a short knife. Easy as chips, when they are cool don't attempt it they will break.Cry


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 19 December 2016 at 10:39
Originally posted by crustyo44 crustyo44 wrote:

The stroopwafels are cut in halve when hot with a short knife. Easy as chips, when they are cool don't attempt it they will break.Cry


Good tip - thank you, and welcome to the FoTW forum!

-------------
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/registration_rules.asp?FID=0" rel="nofollow - click here and join the discussions in our community!



Print Page | Close Window