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Recipe Storage

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: Other Food-Related Topics
Forum Name: The Tools of the Trade
Forum Discription: A place to discuss pots, pans, appliances, crockery, utensils and gadgets.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=4787
Printed Date: 24 September 2017 at 08:07


Topic: Recipe Storage
Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Subject: Recipe Storage
Date Posted: 19 April 2017 at 05:31
How do you store, retrieve, and physically use your recipes?

This is not an idle question. I know most modern cooks use their computers, somehow or other. But don’t know the details.

Personally, I’m a dinosaur. My recipes go on index cards, which are filed, in appropriate boxes, by category. This includes recipes taken from cookbooks. In the past, I’ve found, that if there’s a dish I like in a cookbook, and I want to make it again, I can’t find it. Not when there are several hundred books devoted to cuisine and cooking. So any recipe I want to keep goes on a card.

The majority of my recipe cards are on 4 x 6 cards, and fit in a series of metal index card boxes. Once those were filled, I started using the regular pressboard type boxes, just for cost and storage-room reasons.
Some, particularly longer, recipes go on letter-sized paper, and are kept, also by category, in plastic protectors, stored in loose-leaf binders. Many of my bread recipes, for example, fit that category.
Of late I’ve been using 5 x 8 cards, for longer recipes that won’t fit on the smaller size. These are cross-referenced; that is, in my small-card file I’ll put a card that identifies the recipe, and refers to it being in the large-card file.

In use, I have two approaches. Most of the time I use recipe holders that a friend taught me to make more years ago than I care to remember. Essentially, these are pedestals made from scrap wood, with a wooden clothespin mounted, diagonally, to actually hold the card. These are cheap (practically free), easy to make, and, with a bit of paint or stain, can fit with any décor. They also make great gifts, btw. If anyone wants specifics I’ll be glad to supply them.

For the full-sheet recipes, and, lately, the larger cards, I have a couple of mini-bulldog clips attached to the bottom of a cabinet door, right above my work surface.

Something I regret: In the dim past, for no particular reason, I didn’t include the source of a recipe on the card. Once I started writing about food, however, I felt it particularly important to credit a recipe’s source. So, after typing in the recipe (often as modified by myself), I go down a font size, and, in italics, type: Adapted from……..

What about everyone else? What’s your system?



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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket



Replies:
Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 19 April 2017 at 10:37
    You bring up good points, Brook.  Unfortunately, I really don't have a method of saving my recipes.  I suppose I use this website for writing down some of my recipes...but I really should do more to preserve a hard copy of some of the foods that I cook.

   On a similar note...I wish I would have actively pursued getting both of my grandmothers recipe books.  Both passed before I really had a passion for cooking and I didn't have the foresight to really want to get my hands on those.  To me, and I'm sure for many others who enjoy cooking, having those written recipe books would have been priceless.  Plus, today, I think I would have been able to effectively interpret the written recipes which were written in very "bare form".

    I have a leather bound journal that I write my beer recipes, and notes learned, in...perhaps I should start putting some food recipes in this as well.




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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 19 April 2017 at 11:34
I know what you mean about those grandmother books, Dan.

Years ago, when computers were first coming in, and the internet was in its infancy, a friend and I talked about starting a company called Rescued Recipes. The idea was we would take your grandma's or mother's cooking notebook, reconfigure it into a modern format, and return both to you, along with some extra's we had in mind. You would thereby have grannie's notebook as a family keepsake, but a usable version for cooking.

Unfortunately, we never followed through on it. A shame, really, because so many of those notebooks have gone by the wayside.

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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 19 April 2017 at 14:53
I'm kind of all over the place. I have some family recipes on 3x5 note cards in a photo binder. Most recipes I've gathered from online I store on evernote.com but that's starting to get cumbersome. I have some on my dropbox account, but I often forget about those. And I have about 200+ recipes from my grandmothers (both side) as pictures on my phone that I need to figure out what to do with.

I've been searching for a solution that would allow me to store the recipes online, so that I can access it from computer, phone, whatever, in a format that I like and that is easy to use, but so far I haven't found that holy grail. 

Typically if I'm cooking from a computer recipe I have the ipad sitting on the counter that I refer back to often. Which is somewhat of a pain because it's both in the way, and it goes to sleep a lot, which in turn is a real pain if you're trying to go fast or have dough all over your hands.

Same deal with paper recipes, they just sit on the counter somewhere while I'm cooking.


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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 19 April 2017 at 14:58
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

I know what you mean about those grandmother books, Dan.

Years ago, when computers were first coming in, and the internet was in its infancy, a friend and I talked about starting a company called Rescued Recipes. The idea was we would take your grandma's or mother's cooking notebook, reconfigure it into a modern format, and return both to you, along with some extra's we had in mind. You would thereby have grannie's notebook as a family keepsake, but a usable version for cooking.

Unfortunately, we never followed through on it. A shame, really, because so many of those notebooks have gone by the wayside.


This is a very intriguing idea. So you'd basically convert it to an online format, or a hard copy format? Or both?


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Mike
http://lifeinpitrow.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow - Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 19 April 2017 at 19:29
When my friend and I discussed it, the idea was to convert them to hard copy books. Among the aspects we discussed was updating and translating the recipes as necessary, as well as printing the original versions.

At the time we had neither the funds nor the time to develop the project, and it sort of died. But I've always had it in the back of my mind.

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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 20 April 2017 at 03:12
This was the exact reason I wrote my first book Brook...because I kept losing recipes in computer crashes.

Now I use a clone of Microsft office and save them as .doc files and as pdf files (because most of mine have photos) I save them on my hard drive, and on the cloud, and on google docs. Even if I crash, I have triple redundancy at this point...should be covered.


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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 20 April 2017 at 06:10

One question, Dave, from the dinosaur: When you want to browse recipes looking for something to make, how do you do that with your set-up?



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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 20 April 2017 at 07:49
I have LOTS of cookbooks - my favourite recipes usually find their way from there to my Google cloud drive...and to this forum.

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Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 20 April 2017 at 09:30
So, Ron, riddle me this: when you want to make a dish, how do you retrieve it from the cloud? And, do you then download a hard copy from which to actually work?

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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 20 April 2017 at 09:48
I find it to be pretty easy ~ I simply go into my Google Drive, "with the push of a button," then retrieve it from wherever I filed it. Depending on what's going on and how the cook will go down, I either work off my phone/computer screen, or print it out on paper. I actually prefer to use the phone or computer, because it forces me to be extra careful. My printed copies don't last long, and end up looking like Napoleon's army marched across them.

Also, as mentioned, almost every recipe of interest that I have ends up here, posted under it's appropriate location. If the recipe isn't already on the Google Drive, I'll simply come here to the forum, and proceed from there as I would if I were on the Google Drive; i.e., I'll either work off my phone/computer, or I will select, copy and print a copy on paper.

Because of the work schedule that The Beautiful Mrs. Tas and I have, our son Mike often ends up cooking the meals. If this is the case, I'll copy and send the recipe to him on his email or FaceBook Messenger, or I'll print out a copy for him.

It's all pretty versatile and flexible.

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Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 21 April 2017 at 03:54
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:


One question, Dave, from the dinosaur: When you want to browse recipes looking for something to make, how do you do that with your set-up?


I just open the folder and surf through the titles Brook, then open however many I'm interested in with open office. If I keep it in my files it means I've made it and am at least passingly familiar with the ingredients and techniques used in it. Once I make up my mind I just print it up and hang it from the pot rack in the kitchen as needed for reference.


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Go ahead...play with your food!



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