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Smoked Cheese

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: The US and Canada
Forum Name: American Barbecue, Grilling and Smoke-Cooked Foods
Forum Discription: Cooking with fire is something that is universal across the globe, but in the US it has risen to incredible heights.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=495
Printed Date: 17 November 2017 at 19:47


Topic: Smoked Cheese
Posted By: Hoser
Subject: Smoked Cheese
Date Posted: 29 April 2010 at 02:41
I'm going to be smoking up some gouda, mozzarella and muenster this weekend and I'm curious. How long do you folks let the finished product sit in the fridge before you taste it? I know it has to "cure" some, but I'm not sure how long to let it go before I cut and eat it.

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Go ahead...play with your food!



Replies:
Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 29 April 2010 at 07:04
overnight seems to be good enough, but of course it is one of those things where "the longer the better" is the rule.....up to a point!


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 29 April 2010 at 11:22
Gotcha Ron, and thanks...I don't think I could have waited a week.

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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: AK1
Date Posted: 09 May 2012 at 13:55
Two weeks.  It takes about that long for all the flavours to come together.


Posted By: pitrow
Date Posted: 09 May 2012 at 14:09
I find it kind of depends on the cheese and how much smoke you put to it.

Harder cheeses and/or heavier smoke I like to let rest longer. I'd start sampling it after a week or so, and find where you like it.

Softer cheeses or stuff you do with less smoke seems to mellow out faster. I did a batch of cheese curds once and they were mellowed out nice two days after the smoke. The chili pepper/garlic cheddar I did at the same time took about a week to mellow out to my liking.

but then again,  it's all up to your personal tastes. If it tastes good to you the next day or even right out of the smoker, then go for it! Smile


Posted By: AK1
Date Posted: 09 May 2012 at 17:56
Yes & no IMO. Obviously different cheeses will need different amounts of smoke.  My opinion is that regardless of the cheese and/or the smoke, it takes about 2 weeks for the flavours to blend properly. At that point IMO it's good for everyone. Of course some may like the cheese right off the smoker some may not. I feel that if you wait 2 weeks, everyone is happy.

Darko


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 14 July 2012 at 12:47
Guys,
 
Interesting Post ...
 
I would like to smoke some Italian Bufala di Mozzarella, Provolone and Home Made Ricotta.
 
Any steps 1 - 10 on how to do´s ?
 
Thanks.
Have a fab wkend,
Ciao. Margi.


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www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com


Posted By: Hoser
Date Posted: 15 July 2012 at 03:30
My initial advice to you Margi, would be to use a very low temperature in your smoker, and to watch it carefully or you can wind up with something that looks like this.



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Go ahead...play with your food!


Posted By: AK1
Date Posted: 15 July 2012 at 08:48
Hi Margi;

Here's a simple way to make smoked cheese;
http://www.culturecheesemag.com/can_do/spring_2012/homemade_smoker" rel="nofollow - http://www.culturecheesemag.com/can_do/spring_2012/homemade_smoker




Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 15 July 2012 at 09:01
AK1,
 
Truly appreciate your helpfulness and for sending me the link.
 
Have a lovely Sunday. I shall take a more in depth look at the website you have sent me, during the week and clarify some points I am sure right here.
 
Kind regards.
Margi-


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www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com


Posted By: AK1
Date Posted: 15 July 2012 at 20:11
You are very welcome Margi.

I'd love to be more specific but to do so I need to know what equipment you have, where you want to smoke, etc.

The most important thing will be cold smoke. You'll want little to no heat coming through, as that will cause the cheese to start melting.


Posted By: gracoman
Date Posted: 08 December 2013 at 14:10
Today's cheese smoke is on.
My handy dandy AMNPS
http://s1293.photobucket.com/user/gracoman/media/AMNPS_zpsca0a2b7d.jpg.html">

White cheddar, sharp cheddar and pepper jack.  These will be under maple and cherry smoke for 4 hours then placed in a plastic bag to be put in the fridge overnight.  They will be vac sealed tomorrow then the wait begins.  Minimum 2 weeks before opening.
http://s1293.photobucket.com/user/gracoman/media/Cheesesmokeison_zps6b744af3.jpg.html">


Posted By: Effigy
Date Posted: 08 December 2013 at 23:42
Oh yummmmmmm, I love smoked cheese but wouldn't know where to begin to make it - assuming I even owned a smoker. Well I can dream along with your posts.

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Resident Peasant


Posted By: Rod Franklin
Date Posted: 09 December 2013 at 05:04
I've had to purchase every piece of smoked cheese I've ever eaten. There was a time when I would eat a turkey and smoked gouda cheese sandwich almost every day.

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Hungry


Posted By: gracoman
Date Posted: 09 December 2013 at 06:57
Store bought "smoked" cheese is not actually smoked.  It is bathed in smoke flavoring.  Were you to serve home smoked cheese side by side with store bought, the difference would be immediate and dramatic. Store bought smoked cheese elicits a "I like smoked cheese" reaction whereas home smoke cheese gets more of a "Be still my beating heart.  Where have you been all my life?"

Home smoked cheese is an outstanding treat well worth the minimal effort it takes to produce it.  It also makes for a wonderful, much appreciated holiday gift. 

The only requirements are cool temps and a cold smoker of some sort.  Heck, with an AMNPS you could use a vented cardboard box as the cabinet if you wanted to.  Yes, its just that easy.  Cooler temps are why cheese smoking begins in November and ends in the Spring.  It can still be done with added ice but I just keep it a seasonal thing.

I'll be smoking gouda and provolone today for more unsuspecting recipients.

http://www.amazenproducts.com/ - http://www.amazenproducts.com/   




Posted By: gonefishin
Date Posted: 09 December 2013 at 07:17
Originally posted by gracoman gracoman wrote:

  Cooler temps are why cheese smoking begins in November and ends in the Spring.  It can still be done with added ice but I just keep it a seasonal thing.

   That's really good advice.  No need for ice at all...we've already got a cold box to begin with.  When cold smoking in my smoker, I usually just light a corner of two pieces of lump...then place two pieces of smokin' wood on top of that...plenty of smoke and it doesn't heat up the chamber.  But add in the seasonal weather and it would be even better.

   Thanks Graco!


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Enjoy The Food!


Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 09 December 2013 at 08:11
assuming I even owned a smoker.

Anne, it's easy to assume, from the literature and specialized web sites, that you need a lot of fancy equipment to smoke foods. Nothing is further from the truth.

A smoker consists of an enclosed container and a smoke generator. That last just means a heat source to get the wood to smoulder.

I used to make smokers from galvanized trash cans, using a charcoal starter as the heat source and a tin pie pan to hold the chips. Heat was controlled with a rheostat (read "dimmer switch).

I've seen some rather good results from a cardboard box as the chamber, with the smoke led to it with some duct work.

So don't let the lack of equipment deter you from enjoying home-smoked foods. Smoking is the ultimate in making-do with what you have.


Posted By: AK1
Date Posted: 09 December 2013 at 10:26
What Brook said. 

Just think about what you need.... a smoke source, a way to bring that smoke cold to an enclosed chamber with the cheese in it. Easy peasy!!!


Posted By: gracoman
Date Posted: 09 December 2013 at 17:27
MacGyver one
http://www.ourkrazzykitchen.com/2010/12/how-to-make-your-own-smoked-cheese.html - http://www.ourkrazzykitchen.com/2010/12/how-to-make-your-own-smoked-cheese.html


Posted By: Effigy
Date Posted: 09 December 2013 at 20:03
Originally posted by gracoman gracoman wrote:

MacGyver one
http://www.ourkrazzykitchen.com/2010/12/how-to-make-your-own-smoked-cheese.html - http://www.ourkrazzykitchen.com/2010/12/how-to-make-your-own-smoked-cheese.html

Eff is humming happily to herself, there is nothing like a 'Project' to make one happy.
... off course I'm not sure that the original contents of the box will be any cheaper than a smoker, but that's the magic of womanly persuasion. Evil Smile

Thank you!


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Resident Peasant


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 10 December 2013 at 23:25
yep, like gm said, cooler weather is a great time for smoking cheese and is usually when most of ours gets smoked. i've used my little chief smoker, and now have an A-MAZE-N pellet smoker like the one pictured above to play with....happy times!

Anne, listen to us - it's much easier and less-specialised than it seems....and it opens whole new doors for you!




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Posted By: priya456
Date Posted: 12 July 2017 at 02:32
Many types of smoked cheeses are smoked in smokers rather than by a wide-open fire. The smokers waft smoke over wheels of cheese as they age on racks. Some cheesemakers use small smokers. Others, like Rumiano Fine Natural Cheese, build walk-in smokers that accommodate larger quantities of cheese. A cheese can be lightly smoked, so the finished product has a very subtle smokiness, or heavily smoked.

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ghost


Posted By: Margi Cintrano
Date Posted: 12 July 2017 at 03:48


The best smoked cheese I have ever had is a conical 100% raw  cow milk variety:  

Galician San  Simon which is smoked on Wood. 

The designation:   Lugo,  Galicia,  Spain .. 

When one opens the "cheese paper that it is wrapped in", the aromas of Wood burning are absolutely amazing .. 

Incredible if you can find it at a specialised cheese shop of European cheeses.  Or order it online from José Andrés Shop, however, it is rarely exported.  Small boutique producers .. 





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www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com


Posted By: Percebes
Date Posted: 13 July 2017 at 06:34
Originally posted by Margi Cintrano Margi Cintrano wrote:



The best smoked cheese I have ever had is a conical 100% raw  cow milk variety:  

Galician San  Simon which is smoked on Wood. 

The designation:   Lugo,  Galicia,  Spain .. 

When one opens the "cheese paper that it is wrapped in", the aromas of Wood burning are absolutely amazing .. 

Incredible if you can find it at a specialised cheese shop of European cheeses.  Or order it online from José Andrés Shop, however, it is rarely exported.  Small boutique producers .. 




Sounds delicious.

My only experience with European Smoked Cheese was in Greece I tried a Metsovone. Ok but too firm


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I am a wine enthusiast. The more wine I drink, the more enthusiastic I become.



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