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Königsberger Klopse (also known as Soßklopse)

Printed From: Foods of the World Forum
Category: Europe
Forum Name: Germany
Forum Discription: From the Alsatian influence in the west to the hearty eastern border, Germany has tradition and variety.
URL: http://foodsoftheworld.ActiveBoards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=5411
Printed Date: 23 September 2020 at 20:23


Topic: Königsberger Klopse (also known as Soßklopse)
Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Subject: Königsberger Klopse (also known as Soßklopse)
Date Posted: 15 May 2019 at 13:19
Königsberger Klopse (also known as Soßklopse)
Poached Meatballs In Lemon-And-Caper Sauce

From Time/Life's Foods of the World - The Cooking of Germany, 1969:


Königsberger Klopse differ from other meatballs being poached. they always contain pork and at least one other kind of meat, very finely ground and combined with seasoning, eggs and bread crumbs. Dropped into boiling liquid, they are cooked like dumplings. Capers flavour the sauce showed being poured.

to serve 4:

Meatballs:

1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup finely chopped onions
2 slices homemade-type fresh white bread with crusts removed
2 tablespoons heavy cream
1/3 pound lean boneless beef*
1/3 pound lean boneless pork*
1/3 pound lean boneless veal*
3 flat anchovy fillets, drained, rinsed in cold water and coarsely chopped, or substitute 1 teaspoon anchovy paste
2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

*The meats should be ground together 3 times.

Poaching Liquid:

2 quarts water
1 medium-sized onion, peeled and pierced with 1 whole clove
1 small bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt

Sauce:

4 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons flour
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon capers, drained
2 egg yolks
2 tablespoons sour cream


Meatballs: Melt 1 tablespoon of butter in a small skillet over moderate heat and in it cook the chopped onions for 5 minutes, or until they are transparent but not brown. Remove the skillet from the heat. Tear the bread into small pieces into a large bowl, add the cream and mix well. Add the onions, ground meat, anchovy fillets or anchovy paste, parsley, eggs, lemon peel, 1/2 teaspoon salt and black pepper. Knead vigorously with both hands until the ingredients are well combined, then put the mixture through the finest blade of a meat grinder. Moistening your hands lightly with cold water, shape the mixture into 8 large meatballs about 2 inches in diameter.

Poaching Liquid: In a heavy 6- to 8-quart saucepan or soup pot, bring the water, whole onion, bay leaf and 1 teaspoon of salt to a boil over high heat. Boil, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Then reduce the heat to low and drop in the meatballs. Simmer, uncovered, for 20 minutes, or until the Klopse rise to the surface of the water. With a slotted spoon, transfer them to a deep heated platter and cover them with aluminum foil to prevent their darkening upon exposure to air. Strain the poaching liquid through a fine sieve into a bowl and put it aside.

Sauce: In a heavy 10- to 12-inch skillet, melt 4 tablespoons of butter over moderate heat. When the foam subsides, stir in the flour. Pour in 3 cups of the poaching liquid and bring it to a boil, beating constantly with a whisk until the sauce thickens and is smooth. Reduce the heat to low, add the lemon juice and capers and simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes. In a small bowl break the egg yolks up with a fork, then stir into them 1/4 cup of the simmering sauce. Whisk the mixture back into the skillet and stir in the sour cream. Taste for seasoning. Add the meatballs and simmer, basting from time to time, until they are thoroughly heated.

To serve, return the meatballs to the platter, and pour the sauce over them.

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Replies:
Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 15 May 2019 at 23:27
Now this sounds really interesting.

I think, though, that rather than plain water, I'd use stock as the poaching liquid. Other than that, this is definatley on my to-do list.




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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 16 May 2019 at 08:39
I would also use stock, Brook - it just makes sense, to me.

I guess the question, though, would be: which stock? I think that beef stock might take away from the lemon and the capers; chicken is an option, but wouldn't veal stock be more likely, in Germany?

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Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 16 May 2019 at 22:05
Veal stock? Yeah, right! With whose second mortgage?

You could go with a thin beef stock. For example, if using the BTB base, try using only a half teaspoon per cup.  That would still contribute flavor, but not overpower the other ingredients. 


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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket


Posted By: TasunkaWitko
Date Posted: 17 May 2019 at 09:07
I got to thinking last night that your venison stock would probably be excellent as well, and should fit within the German profile?

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Posted By: HistoricFoodie
Date Posted: 17 May 2019 at 09:47
Thumbs Up

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But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket



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