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Progressive Dinner For Oct 17

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 10 October 2013 at 10:17
It's gonna be hard to top this past weeks dinner, I reckon. But let's try our best.

Here are the assignments, due no later than October 17:

Appy: Ahron
First: Ron
Soup/salad: Margi
Seafood: Hila
Main: Brook
Dessert: Anne

As usual, let's wait for the seafood and main courses to be posted so we can balance the other dishes to them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 October 2013 at 07:58
Two years ago, when I was in the process of getting my natural teeth replaced, I took umbrage over the fact my dentist and his staff ate junk food for lunch. I mean, really? You call that setting an example? So I promised that I would bring them a real lunch.

I wanted to really make it special, so developed this dish. It was a big hit. And we’ve served it as a main course several times since.

Although I make it with pheasant, there’s no reason chicken, turkey, or other fowl wouldn’t work just as well.

Pheasant-Stuffed Flank Steak on Parsnip Mash

Pheasant-Stuffed Flank Steak

1 large flank steak (1 ½-1 ¾ lbs)
1 lb mushrooms
1 recipe pheasant forcemeat
Several roasted red bell peppers
Salt & Pepper
1 tbls each butter and olive oil
Parsnip mash
Pinot-noir reduction

Preheat oven to 350F.

Make a duxelle with the mushrooms. Chop them very fine and cook in a dry skillet until all the liquid has evaporated. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

Pound flank steak until very thin, keeping it as much rectangular as possible. Season with salt and pepper. Put a layer of duxelle over the meat, followed by a layer of pheasant forcemeat, followed by strips of roasted peppers. Roll tightly and tie with kitchen twine about every inch or so.

Heat the butter and oil in a skillet. Sear the roll on all sides. Transfer to the oven and roast until internal temperature reaches 155F. Let meat rest before cutting into pinwheels about ¾-inch thick.

PHEASANT FORCEMEAT

Meat from one pheasant breast, cut in cubes
Slab bacon, half the volume of the pheasant, cut in cubes
1 small onion, cut in chunks
Salt, pepper, and rosemary to taste
Large handful roasted chestnuts (or sub pine nuts or even pistachios)
Large handful dried dates, chopped small

Combine the first five ingredients in a bowl and toss to coat meat with seasonings. Grind, using medium plate. Add the dates, distributing them evenly.

PARSNIP MASH

1 lb parsnips, peeled and cut into evenly sized chunks
1 tsp grated ginger
2 tbls butter
Salt and pepper to taste
Crème fraiche
Squeeze of lemon (optional)

Boil the parsnips in salted water until very tender.

Mash parsnips, discarding any hard cores. Combine with the butter, ginger, salt, and pepper. Blend in enough crème fraiche to achieve desired consistency. Mash should be on the stiff side. Adjust seasonings. Add a squeeze of lemon if desired.

PINOT NOIR REDUCTION

2 cups pinot noir
2 tbls sugar
Pinch black pepper

Combine ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer until reduced at least in half. Reduction should be thickened and slightly syrupy.

For service: Using a squeeze bottle, create a nice pattern on an individual serving plate with the pinot noir reduction. I like using a spider-web design for this. Put a mound of parsnip mash on the plate and arrange two or three flank steak pinwheels on it.
     This is one of the rare times when centering the food works well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 October 2013 at 17:18


From: Margaux Cintrano

I believe in light salads and light soups ( as well as starters, when having a heafty main, especially if it is a meat or game dish ).


LEEK SOUP WITH IBERIAN ACORN FED HAM

1 tablespoon Evoo
20 grams of French room temperatura butter ( to not sub margarine )
3 large leeks minced finely
FOR ADORNMENT: 6 slices of Iberian Ham or sub: Prosciutto di Parma
1 stalk of celery diced very finely
2 Laurel or Bay leaves
2 zucchini peeled and sliced very finely
80 Ml. of cream
15 grams of minced fresh parsely
2 Cloves of garlic finely minced


1) Preheat oven to 10 centigrade degrees
2) Heat the Evoo and the butter in a large roasting pan
3) add the hamand sauté 1.5 minutes
4) add the minced leek, the garlic, the zucchini, the celery and 2 leaves of Laurel or Bay leaf, and stir with wooden spoon 3 minutes
5) now introduce the sautéed vegetables in a roasting pan in the oven and roast for 1/2 hour with the ham
6) Cover the roasting pan with aluminum foil
7) Transfer the ingredients into a stock pot and add chicken or vegetable stock
8) SLOW LOW FLAME, FUEGO LENTO, simmer the soup for 30 minutes
9) stir with wooden spatula from time to time and add the cream very slowly
10) Now, let the soup cool a few minutes, and serve in deep bowls with ham strips ( virutas ) and serve with: rustic dark country bread and a glass of semi sweet White wine of choice / leeks are hard to pair with dry wines, as they créate too much acid. Go with a Prosecco, or Cava or Apple Cider Sparkling.
11) note: I prefer chunky soups, however, one can créate a finer versión by blending and putting through sieve.

Enjoy.
Margaux Cintrano.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2013 at 14:04
I wanted to use rhubarb as soon as I read pheasant. So I went hunting for a recipe that was a bit special and I found this. I won't have time to prepare it myself this week, but I will at some stage because it sounds amazing.

Rhubarb and Tomato Tart

 
The acidity of the rhubarb and the sweetness of the tomato jam in a tart. A sweet shortcrust pastry, almond cream, rhubarb cream and tomato jam.

For a 20 cm diameter tart (about 6 servings),

The Tomato Jam :
- 400 gr tomato pulp
- 150 gr sugar
- verbena (tea bag or better, fresh)

Clean, peel and remove the seeds of the tomatoes to get about 400 gr pulp. Mix it in a food processor, then put it in a pan with the sugar and the verbena. Cook for about 20 minutes but remove the verbena after 5 minutes.

Must be still fluid, lightly thick. Pass through a sieve and reserve.

 
The Sweet Shortcrust Pastry :
- 200 gr flour
- 100 gr butter (softened)
- 50 gr icing sugar
- 1 small egg (or 50 gr)
- 20 gr ground almonds
- pinch of salt

Cream the sugar with the butter, then add the flour and the salt and mix, no need to be homogeneous.

 
Add the egg and the ground almonds... 


Knead quickly, do not over mix and spread over a plastic film. Place in the fridge for at least 1 hour.


The Almond Cream :
- 35 gr ground almond
- 35 gr butter (softened)
- 15 gr sugar
- 25 gr egg

Beat all the ingredients together until homogeneous. Reserve.


The Rhubarb Cream :

- 300 gr rhubarb (cleaned and peeled)
- 30 gr sugar
- 1/2 tsp vanilla powder
- 100 gr eggs
- 25 gr sugar
- 60 gr butter
- 1/2 gelatin sheet (1 gr)

Hydrate the gelatin in cold water.

In a pan, cook (medium heat) the rhubarb with 30 gr sugar and the vanilla until it gets the consistency of a jam. Allow to cool down 10 minutes.


Beat the rhubarb paste with 25 gr sugar and the eggs... 


Cook over low heat until it starts to boil, add the gelatin (drained), stir until dissolved, then out of the heat add the butter. Mix in a food processor.

 
The Assembly :
- 3 tbsp lemon juice
- 2 gelatin sheets (4 gr)
Roll out the shortcrust dough 3 mm thick, put it in the tart pan. Prick the bottom with a fork. Place baking paper and ceramic balls or beans. Put in preheated oven (medium heat) for 10 to 15 minutes....


... then remove the balls and baking paper and pipe in the almond cream (with a pastry bag or a spoon). Put back in the oven for 10 minutes more.


Allow to cool down completely. Then pour in the rhubarb cream. Leave room (about 2 mm) for the tomato jam. Put in the fridge for 1 hour ( or 20 minutes in the freezer).

 
Prepare the tomato jam glaze.

Hydrate the gelatin (2 sheets) in cold water.Put the tomato jam in a pan with 3 tbsp lemon juice, warm it up. Add the gelatin (drained) stir until dissolved. Allow to reach room temperature. 


Then pour over the tart. Put back in the fridge for at least 1 hour.



Decorate according your imagination (here with sugared and fried tomato peel). Remove from fridge 30 minutes before serving.


 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2013 at 15:14
That looks amazing!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2013 at 16:27
Anne,

Beautiful pictorial.

What is a good sub for rhubard ? It is typical in France however, not grown in Iberia or Italy.

Thank you. Oh yes, www.foodsubs.com

Margaux.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2013 at 18:07
You could use cranberry or quince.It would give a similar flavour profile. The texture might be different though.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2013 at 19:05
Lovely looking dessert, Anne. I'm not a rhubarb fan, but that one could change my mind.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2013 at 22:20
Margi
I think tamarillo might work. The key to the recipe is that the rhubarb is somewhat tart/sour, whilst the tomato jam is rich and sweet.
I cant help thinking that sour apples could also work. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 October 2013 at 01:50


A K 1 and Anne,

Thank you both. Quince or cranberry or tamarind or tart apples.

I am going to speak with my Farmer´s Market, and see if they can order me some Rhubard; and check the International Market.

There is a French section --- They are large growers.

Thanks, its gorgeous Anne !

I shall update my findings.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 October 2013 at 05:38
this is a great looking Dessert, Anne.
i will have to work hard on my appetizer .
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 October 2013 at 13:10

Chicken Yaki Gyoza 





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 October 2013 at 14:43
   Interesting recipe Brook!

    Interesting using the pounded flank steak with the ground pheasant mixture inside.  I can see the rosemary, nuts and dried dates inside the forcemeat going great with the flank wrapping.  I can also see turkey going very well for this too (not a big fan...but the turkey flavor with the additional fat seems like it would go great).  

The parsnip (with ginger) mash seem like it would hold real well with this main.  I can see taking one of the leftover pinwheels and serving it beside some eggs in the morning.  of course, I'll serve just about any meat beside a couple of eggs Tongue

  Nice recipe, thanks for sharing!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 October 2013 at 15:39
Funny you mention eggs. As I was putting together some leftovers for my meal, this evening, I thought how great a sunny-side-up would go, sitting on top of one of the pinwheels. Great minds, as they say. 

I'm thinking, too, mixing an egg and some breadcrumbs in with the parsnips and frying them up would make a nice sub for hash browns. I'll have to give that a try. 
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 October 2013 at 19:21
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:


I'm thinking, too, mixing an egg and some breadcrumbs in with the parsnips and frying them up would make a nice sub for hash browns. I'll have to give that a try. 


   Oooh...the hashbrown sound good.  Maybe a touch of horseradish in the mash too!
Enjoy The Food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Addtotaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 October 2013 at 04:46
Hummus baked fish with majadra and tahina



Ingredients:
For Tahina:
1 cup tahini paste
1 tbs lemon juice
salt to taste
water

For the Fish
2 cups soaked and cooked chickpeas
2 tbs tahina
1 clove garlic, crushed
1-2 tbs lemon juice, to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
2 fillets meaty white fish (I used what we call Angelfish otherwise known as Ray's Bream)

For the Majadra
1 onion, slices
2 tsp cumin powder
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 cup partially cooked rice
1 cup cooked lentils
salt and pepper to taste

Method:
Preheat oven to 180 Degrees C
Put all the ingredients except the fish in a food processor  and process till almost smooth.
Place the fish in an oiled baking dish and season. Cover in the hummus using wet fingers to create an even crust. Place in the oven for 10 - 15 minutes depending on thickness of fillet. Switch on the grill/ broiler to create a nice brown crust.

In the meantime fry the onions and spices in olive oil until onions are soft. Add the rice and lentils and stir fry until rice is soft. Season to taste

Mix the tahini paste with lemon juice and salt. Add water slowly, mixing a little at a time.  The oaste will seize at first but keep mixing in a little at a time until it creates a runny sauce. Season accordingly.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 October 2013 at 09:19
Everything looks great! I've been holding off on the first course because I had something in mind, but wanted to wait and see what the main and seafood courses are in order to be sure that what I chose would be a good match. I am pretty confident that is the case here!
 
My choice for the first course is going to be something that I learned from a good man and a good friend: Dave - AKA Hoser. It's perfect for this time of year, it goes well with our main course and is complimentary, i think, to our seafood course. It's easy, it's delicious, and it can look great on a plate with the proper presentation. I've made it as a main course, and the photos that I have will reflect that - however, it is very easy to portion as a first course, so no worries there.
 
My choice for this week is a New England (and probably mid-western) American classic: stuffed pumpkin. This can be as easy or as complicated as you want it to be, but in essence it comes down to this: take a pumpkin or some pumpkins (I think small sugar pumpkins would be perfect for our dinner), then hollow them out, reserving the lids. Once this is done, stuff them with a meat filling mixture; it can be anything you want - even your favourite meatloaf or cabbage roll recipe - then bake in the oven until both the pumpkins and the filling are done - remove the lids and top with cheese halfway through the baking.
 
For mine, here is the recipe that I used:
 
4 small pumpkins
2 lbs lean burger
1 lb thick-cut smoked bacon, diced and pre-cooked to eliminate most of the fat
1 bunch spring onions, chopped fine
2 large garlic cloves, minced
Salt-n-pepper
2 eggs
8 oz sharp cheddar cheese, diced
1 can cream of celery soup
 
Everything except the pumpkins and half of the cheese was for the stuffing; the last two ingredients might be considered cheating a little, but when I made this, it was all about weeknight cooking with what's available. I really wanted to try diced apples in this as per Dave's suggestion, and I also needed some sort of binder such as rice, oatmeal.....or breadcrumbs..... the stuffing provided both, plus a few herbs and spices to add to the party. The apples in the stuffing are dehydrated of course, but there was plenty of moisture to reconstitute them during cooking. The soup added moisture as well as flavour since there was no celery in the house at the time.
 
Here's how my attempt looked coming out of the oven:
 
 
Not quite as nice as Dave's, but they were indeed very good tasting, and took the chill off the blustery evening. A close-up of the top shows all that golden-crusty goodness of the cheese:
 
 
Too much cheese? Maybe, but remember that these are going to be cut into quarters or possibly even sixths for serving as a first course, so it's all good.
 
There is a very nice plethora of notes, step-by-step photos and other important information that can be found by following the link below:
 
 
There, you will find Dave's original, BEAUTIFUL post, and also my attempt, which was not as good as it could have been, but I did learn from the experience. Come to think of it - it is definitely that time of year, so I'm thinking that this would be a good candidate for the weekend menu.
 
I hope you all enjoy it. It provides a rustic, autumny (is that a word?) ambience that goes hand-in-hand with Brook's main course, and I believe that it also works quite well with Hila's seafood course, since her dish reminded me of North Africa and the Middle East, where pumpkins thrive and are used to great effect. There's a clear bridge to Anne's rhubarb and tomato tart, as well.
 
Any questions, just ask, and I hope that some of you are inspired to try it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 October 2013 at 11:32
Sounds good, Ron.

I'm wondering: Have you seen those mini-pumpkins the stores have been selling the past few years? They're only about the size of a baseball. I've no idea what their taste/texture is like, but, from a size point of view, they might be perfect for this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 October 2013 at 11:36
I think those would work just fine - and presentation could go in many directions. When I envision it on a plate, I see a quarter, sixth or 8th of a pumpkin (depending on the size of the pumpkin) resting on a plate in sort of a moon position, with garnish or other components arranged alongside in a way that would be appropriate. But for the Autumn - especially witih a harvest moon in October coming up - a whole, small pumpkin would make a nice full moon presentation.
 
Maybe I've simply seen "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown!" too many times! Shocked
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 October 2013 at 11:40
I got a rock
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