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Progressive Dinner for Sept 5

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 31 August 2013 at 22:40
Well, guys, this is our last dinner for this sequence. Let's make it a gangbusters.

Normally it would have been Dave's turn for the main course. So I'll fill in for him. I'll post it in the next day or two, and everyone else can then work around it for a nicely balanced meal.

Here are the assignments:

Appy: Ron
First course: Anne
Main: Brook
Side: Dan:
Dessert: Brook

Let's give some thought, too, to whether we want to continue with this, and, if so, how we can attract other FotWers to take part.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2013 at 23:44
I have the most perfect first course I would love to share with you all, but it is just too particular to where I live and how I live.
Whitebait Fritters
So that is not what I will offer...
I will think hard about how to get the tastes and flavours truly universally international.

The fun thing about a progressive dinner in real life is that you get to taste each home's cuisine, in this virtual example I think we really need to stick to flavours that are available to all of us.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 07:18
Whitebait and smelt are the same thing, Anne. Or close enough to make no never mind. And smelt are readily available.

So I see no reason not to run with that dish if you want.

The only downside is that I'm planning fish for the main course, and we don't want to conflict.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 07:56


Brook,

I have a suggestion; since I would like to participate, and do not really have alot of free time, my suggestion is:


To wine and food pair each dish, with a different wine, from all the world´s designations.

This is very common in Spain, called a MARIDAJE ( pronounced: Ma ree dah Hey ) ...

Once each dish is submitted on FOTW, or by you to me directly; I can wine pair that specific dish with a choice of wines that would enhance and pair perfectly with each of the different dishes.

I am a licensed Catadora, which is: A sommelier, however, it is not veered toward the hopsitality service industry; it is for working in a winery tasting the wines at different stages of oak fermentation; wine retail, and tourism industry ... publishing industry.

It denotes: Certified Wine Taster ... A Master´s Sommelier Course, is much more extensive on serving, clientel relationships, sales and depending on the establishment,purchasing and working hand in hand with The Food and beverage Director or as a Professor ; etcetra ...

Many oenologists are Certified Wine Tasters, and Sommeliers.

Thank you for the opportunity in advance to participate ...

Can also of course, include beverages: Cider, soft drinks, punches, etcetra ...

Look forward to hearing your ideas on subject, which includes my participation as a long standing member of FOTW.

Thank you,
Margi.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 07:56
For our last meal of this first progressive dinner I’d like to see us really go out with a bang. So, for the main course, I’ve chosen Eric Ripert’s Black Bass With Port Wine.

It’s no secret that I’m a big fan of Ripert. If he’s not the finest seafood chef in America he runs whoever is a very close second. If any proof is needed, not only does Le Bernardin, his flagship restaurant, carry three Michelin stars, it has four-star ranking from the New York Times, and has held that position continuously for more than 20 years---the only restaurant with such a distinction.

The Black Bass With Port Wine was Le Bernardin’s signature dish for many years.

This particular recipe is close to my heart, because it’s the first dish I every prepared using restaurant type techniques and procedures. I used a striped bass, that first time, which I’d caught myself in the surf.

Among the things I learned from it was that seemingly illogical steps often do make a difference. For example, you might think that there’d be no difference, with two liquids are being reduced, between reducing them separately or combining them and reducing them at one time. But it actually does make a difference.

Anyway, here is our main course for this week:

Black Bass With Port Wine

1 cup ruby port
½ cup Sherry vinegar
1 stick butter, softened
Salt and pepper to taste
¼ cup vegetable oil
4 6-ouce sea bass filets
¼ cup five-spice powder
2-3 tbls peanut oil (approx.)
1 ½ cups wild mushrooms, sliced
2 large shallots, finely chopped
1 tbls minced fresh parsley
1 tbls fresh thyme leaves, finely chopped

Boil the port in a heavy saucepan over moderately high heat until thick and syrupy; there should be just enough liquid to thinly coat the bottom of the pan. Stir in the vinegar and boil until syrupy. Remove from heat and whisk in the butter. Season with salt & pepper.

In a large skillet heat the vegetable oil over moderately high heat. Season fish filets lightly with salt and pepper. Coat each filet on both sides with the five-spice powder. Sauté the filets in the hot pan, turning once, until crusty on the outside and opaque throughout. Transfer to a platter and keep warm.

If necessary, add peanut oil to the pan. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring frequently, over moderately high heat until softened and browned. Add the shallots, parsley and thyme and cook until the shallots are translucent. Season with salt and pepper.

Arrange each filet on a bed of mushrooms. Top with the sauce.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 08:35
I don’t do desserts very often. And when I do I like keeping them on the simple side, and not overly sweet.

This one fits that bill to a T:

Pound Cake With Raspberry Sauce and Honey Yogurt Topped Grilled Fruit


1 recipe Ahron’s pound cake (http://www.foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/pound-cake_topic3721.html)
1 recipe Chocolate Raspberry Sauce
1 recipe Honey Yogurt sauce
Peaches, nectarines, apricots in any mixture desired

Bake the pound cake in fancy muffin tins, ramekins, brioche tins, or similar molds. At this size, bake only about 35 minutes. Set on racks to cool.

Split the fruits in half. Remove the pits. Brush the cut sides thinly with extra virgin olive oil followed by honey. Grill over hot coals until fruit is tender and cut sides take on grill marks, five to ten minutes total time. Set aside.

Make the raspberry sauce:

1 pkg (10-12 oz) frozen raspberries, defrosted
½ cup sugar
½ cup orange juice
½ ounce semi-sweet chocolate
1 tbls cornstarch dissolved in 2 tbls Grand Marnier

Press the berries through a sieve or tamis to remove the seeds. You can do this directly over the pan in which you’ll be making the sauce. To the berry pulp add the sugar, orange juice, and chocolate. Simmer until sugar and chocolate melts and sauce thickens slightly. Add the cornstarch slurry and continue cooking until sauce thickens to desired consistency.

Can be made ahead.

Make the yogurt sauce:

1 cup yogurt
2 tbls honey or date syrup
1 tsp finely grated fresh ginger

Combine ingredients. Let sit so flavors can meld.

Can be made ahead and kept in the fridge.

For plating, with a spoon draw an arc on a plate with the raspberry sauce. You want to use a fair amount of the sauce. Cut the individual pound cakes in slices about 3/8 inch thick. Fan the slices, slightly overlapping, so the tops just overlap the sauce, and follow its line.

Arrange some of the fruit in the hollow formed by the bottoms of the cake slices. I like to slice them further so only a fork is needed for the dessert. Drizzle the fruit with the yogurt sauce. Serve addition sauce on the side if desired.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 08:54
Margi, when we first kicked this idea around the question of beverages came up. We agreed that it was up to the individual posters to offer suggestions, particularly if specific drinks when with the dish.

If the group as a whole wants you to do those pairings I’ll certainly go along. But if you want to participate I’d much prefer you did so with tried and true dishes. That, after all, is the whole point of the exercise.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 09:18

Brook,

I would be more than pleased to participate, with tried and true dishes, surely.

On the wine pairing question; let us speak to all the participants, and see what their views are; and I would make the commitment to both projects; as it is a weekly Project.

I would also do it in suggestions for each part of the meal: a White, a Rosé or a Red, a beer, a non alcoholic and / or a cocktail depending on the dish / appetiser or dessert, a specific type of coffee for example ... etcetra.

The black sea bass with Port and mushrooms sounds phenomenal ... This I shall surely prepare when Phil returns from Argentina ...

It appears, no body else has done the beverage side of the Dinners, so I am offering to do it ...

I also, as you know very much like a large majority of your récipes; and henceforth, wish to compliment you on the poundcake ( Ahron´s récipe ) and the outstanding rasberry & peach / apricot sauce, to pair with the homemade from scratch pound cake ... Fanstastic. I love fresh rasberries ! and peaches & apricots ..

I too do not have much of a sweet tooth, so this is surely perfect after a large meal and not too heavy. However, Phil and I do like to share a black chocolate dessert every so often ...



Thanks for the collaboration and invitation to join with all my colleagues.

Margi.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 09:38
  we're getting ready to head out the door.  Margi, I think this is a good idea, but I think it would work out well if a sister thread is started for the pairings for the progressive dinner. 

Progressive Dinner for Sept 5th - For the food course exercise

then...

Progressive drink pairings for Sept 5th Dinner - To post/discuss the different elements of pairing wine and drink with differing food courses.

 I think this would be a great way to learn elements of cooking foods in courses, and an equally intriguing discussion of pairing drinks with foods.  While I do think these are two different exercises, I think it's a wonderful idea to marry the two through the common theme...although I think a sister thread is warranted (to keep the threads on topic and on discussion to the exercise)

   Anyway...that's my ideas.  I'll read any other discussion/suggestions when I get home tonight.

Dan



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 09:42


EXAMPLE FOR BROOK´s SEA BASS WITH PORT & MUSHROOMS ...

Wine suggestions for the main course, of Sea Bass in Port ...

Firstly,I would defintely go with a Rosé Sparkling or a Rosé or the same Port, chilled that the dish is prepared with.

Suggestions:

1) cava castel d´adge chardonnay rosado brut nature: Pinot Noir 100% Mono varietal, exhibiting a subtle rasberry tone, with rasberry notes and subtle rasberry and strawberry aromas ... very sublime and shall pair wonderfully with the sea bass, the 5 spices ( dry ) & the mushrooms. It has an excellent acid equilibrum and seductive quality. D.O. Sant Sadurni D´Anoia, Barcelona ( 6 Euros ) and exported to the USA.


2) One of the most famous Rosés exported and gold medal award winning is JULIAN CHIVITE ROSÉ GRAN FEUDO from OLITE, NAVARRA. This rosé is available in over 50 countries. It hails from an emblematic wine estate, and costs only 3 Euros a bottle in Iberia.

THE NOTES: The stunning strawberry watermelon color is a delight within itself. It posesses frutal aromas, refreshing and soft on palate, and has a lovely memorable long finish and after taste. It pairs perfectly with; Sea bass and other firm White and coral fish.


This is an example.

Thanks.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 09:45

Dan,

I think your suggestion is excellent. Let us see, what the other members involved on the Project have to say. I like the idea, because it shall open up Wine Discussion topics which is very limited on FOTW.



Thank you, and kind regards,
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 18:44
Deep Fried Zucchini Flowers

For the filling

To fill about 16 baby courgettes, with flowers
1 cup ricotta
1/4c lightly toasted pinenuts
1 tablespoon crushed garlic
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1 tsp finely chopped thyme
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Using a spoon, fill each blossom with about 1 tablespoon ricotta.

For the batter

75g/2¾oz strong white flour
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 egg lightly beaten
good pinch salt
125ml/4fl oz chilled light lager or fizzy water 

Sift the flour and bicarbonate of soda into a mixing bowl. Add the beaten egg and a pinch of salt. Gradually add the lager or sparkling water in a thin stream, whisking continuously with a large whisk until the batter is the consistency of double cream. (NB: Do not over-whisk, as the air will escape from the batter.)

sunflower oil, for deep-frying
3 Tbsp strong white flour
1 lemon, cut into wedges, to serve

Preparation method
Open up the flower of one of the courgettes into the palm of your hand, taking care not to tear it. Carefully remove the stamens and pistil from each with a small knife. Repeat the process with the remaining baby courgettes and filling.

Half-fill a large saucepan with sunflower oil and heat to 180°C / 350°F (use a cooking thermometer to check the temperature).
Sift the flour onto a plate or shallow dish and season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Set aside.

When the oil is hot, dredge the stuffed courgette flowers, one at a time, in the seasoned flour, then dip into the batter until completely covered.

Carefully lower two of the stuffed courgette flowers into the hot oil and fry for 2-3 minutes, turning carefully once or twice, or until crisp and golden-brown. Remove from the pan using a slotted spoon and set aside to drain on kitchen paper.

Repeat the process with the remaining stuffed courgette flowers. Keep warm.

Serve with lemon wedges  for drizzling

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 18:48
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Whitebait and smelt are the same thing, Anne. Or close enough to make no never mind. And smelt are readily available.

When we collect whitebait we throw the smelt back as they are too big.

So no they are not interchangeable.

NZ native whitebait is a completely different species. It is the juvenile forms (around 4–5 centimeters long) of five species of the fish family Galaxiidae.

1. īnanga (Galaxias maculatus)
2. kōaro (Galaxias brevipinnis)
3. banded kōkopu (Galaxias fasciatus)
4. giant kōkopu (Galaxias argenteus)
5. shortjaw kōkopu (Galaxias postvectis).

I have posted in NZ section my recipe for whitebait fritters; I would not recommend using any other type of whitebait, other than perhaps the farmed Chinese version, but there really is no substitute for freshly caught whitebait.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 18:51
Perfect, Anne. Simply perfect for a first course.

I'd still like to see your whitebait fritters recipe. Why don't you post it in the down under forum?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 18:52
Great minds and all that.

Reckon our posts crossed.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 19:02
I think a companion thread on drink pairings makes a lot of sense. That way the suggestions are there, but without cluttering up the actual dinner threads.

I would want it to include more than wines, though, as some dishes naturally pair better with other drinks.

And, to be truly valuable, it should certainly include more than Iberian beverages. Limiting it to those just doesn't make sense to me, for all sorts of obvious reasons.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Sepeptember 2013 at 19:24
I wholeheartedly support a drink pairing thread, its one area I would love to learn more about.

As a rule we usually just have water. My budget does not allow for wine, so I will be happy just reading and imagining. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sepeptember 2013 at 09:25
   A little lagniappe in the form of an amuse-bouche 



Tomato Bread with Prosciutto

  • French baguette
  • Garlic clove
  • Tomato
  • Prosciutto (your choice)
  • finishing Olive Oil and topping salt 


   Cut the bread 1/2" thick and toast on both sides.  Cut a fresh clove of garlic in half, crush it then lightly rub the golden brown toast to leave the garlic oils behind (you'll be surprised at the amount of flavor).  Next, cut a tomato in half and lightly rub the toast in the same manner as with the garlic.  Place a slice of your favorite Jamón on top, add a drizzle of a good olive oil and a bit of topping salt.  Cut into bite sized pieces and plate.


 AvecEric.com


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sepeptember 2013 at 10:49


Separate Wine & Beverage Thread in the Beverage Section ...

Okay, this is surely an execellente idea ...

Just to point out, that in the last 15 years, 99% of the Internaional Wine Challenges throughout the world, have selected Iberian wines, blind folded as the Gold Medal and Silver Medal winners.

This includes the Manhattan event, London, Brussels, and Tokoyo.

I totally agree on world designation of origin wines to be included;

I selected 2 Rosés from Iberia, for their flavor profile with the Sea Bass and mushrooms for their pairing and their Price structure here, and availability via export.

Mendoza, in Argentina, and Sonoma, Napa etcetra, are on the pricey side even for Americans.

Mushrooms are quite challenging to pair, as artichokes are; which the best suggestion is a semi sweet White cava from Sonoma California or Barcelona ... or a semi sweet Prosecco from Treviso, Veneto ...

Shall begin a thread then in BEVERAGES ...

ON SOFT DRINKS: this too shall be included as well as Sidra ( Cider sparkling ); alcohol free beers, lemonades, all natural types of fruit waters etcetra; cocktails ... etcetra ...

Thanks, have nice day.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sepeptember 2013 at 10:51
Anne and Dan,

Lovely selections ... I love zucchini blossoms ...

and needless to say; Prosciutto di parma, is one of my favorites ...

Surely lovely Dan.


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