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Rezance s tvarohom a k么prom

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14 January 2014 at 21:50
From Mike Murcko:
 
Quote My Ancestors came to America more than 100 years ago (from Plave膷 and Pre拧ov). I have no 鈥楽lovak鈥 name for this easy recipe. , but many have asked me for it. You could call it Poznam len niekoliko slov po Slovensku:

Warm Buttered Egg Noodles with Cold Cottage Cheese and Fresh Dill

Chop a small bunch of fresh dill (I use about 1/2 cup of loosely-chopped dill).

In small pan, melt 1/2 stick salted butter; then finely chop 2 to 3 cloves of fresh garlic or a similar amount of chives. Brown very lightly, then remove from heat and keep for later.

In salted water boil 1 pound of medium egg noodles (or make your own, but never use Italian-style pasta) Strain out the water and place in large bowl. Add the butter and garlic mixture and the fresh dill, then add salt and black pepper to taste. Lightly toss, then add one quart of cold, large-curd cottage cheese. Mix quickly and serve.

The cottage cheese is a substitute for that hard-to-find Slovak 鈥渇armers' cheese鈥 or similar style cheese.

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Rod Franklin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2014 at 11:03
Lots of variations on the cottage cheese and noodles theme, and I like them all.
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Furtwangler View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Furtwangler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2014 at 07:24

It's called rezance s tvarohom a k么prom in standard Slovak, it goes by many regional names (flia膷ky, sl铆啪e, sl铆啪iky, rezanky...). 

It's actually not cottage cheese, this is made without rennet using only three ingredients: raw milk, time and heat. It's called tvaroh in Slovak and Czech, twar贸g in Polish, Quark in German, Topfen in Austrian German.

All you need is raw milk, about two litres should be enough for a family of four. Last year, I described the method here:

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/76049/challenge-june-2013-pasta/240#post_433142

The cheese is slightly acidic, fresh tasting and equally at home with both savoury and sweet dishes.

One piece of advice:

When making Slovak pasta, I think it's better to use coarsely-ground flour, something like semolina, but NOT semolina but made from regular wheat just like normal flour, only coarsely ground. In Slovakia, one normally gets three basic kinds of flour (m煤ka) - hladk谩 (fine), polohrub谩 (semi-coarse), hrub谩 (coarse). Then there is, however, krupica, which is in fact wheat meal and is even coarser. You can get detsk谩 krupica (children's wheat meal) and the regular kind, which is the coarsest and is not that far away from fine bulgur. Both kinds of krupica are ill-suited for pasta making (they're used for sweet breakfast porridge and soup dumplings). The ideal kind, in my opinion, is hrub谩 m煤ka.

So if you knead your dough with eggs and hrub谩 m煤ka and maybe a little water, you get pasta with great al dente bite, but a different kind of bite that Italian semolina pasta. It is only my opinion that you should use coarse flour, other Slovaks may disagree. I, however, love that bite and especially when I make flia膷ky s kapustou (pasta with fried cabbage). And that's the way my grandmother used to make it.

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go没t de ce qu'elles sont."
- Curnonsky

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 July 2014 at 22:41
Hi, Furtwangler, and thank you very much for sharing this information ~ I've been wanting to try making tvaroh for quite some time, and your method looks like a great way to do it!

I'm not sure if coarse-ground flour is available near here but will keep an eye out for it. I will also see if I can find it the next time we go to Great Falls or Billings, which are Montana's two largest cities. 

Thank you again for a valuable contribution, and welcome to the FotW! Handshake
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2015 at 15:27
If you are really wanting to have grain flour in a texture to suit you, look for a Corona mill.
I would start on Ebay and Amazon.com
Very small batches could be made in a blender but you would really need to watch the heat.
Ebay has a BUNCH, even an old Porkert to go with Ron's meat grinder.
As with all the handcrank tools, you do need to keep the motor from overheating, however , it would be a good way to get some use out of the rugrats!

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