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Salad turnips

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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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    Posted: 18 May 2013 at 10:08
I've never heard of these before, but boy are they good! They look like white radishes, and they taste like radishes might if they weren't hot. Or like tiny mild kohlrabi. Little crunchy veggie balls. Yum!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2013 at 11:46
Melissa,

If you don't mind planting hybrids you can grow those baby turnips. Tokyo Market is one varietal name for them.

Check out suppliers of Asian seeds, such as Kitazawa (www.kitazawaseed.com.

It's not too late, either, because turnips can be grown as a fall crop.
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2013 at 13:10
Thanks! I tend to have bad luck with root crops (my kohlrabi, carrots and radishes have all failed), but then, I've never tried turnips.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2013 at 14:37
Yeah, they can be persnickety. Last year my carrots did well, but that was the first time they worked for me. Radishes I can usually do. Beets---forgedaboutit.

I've tried salsify several times, with no luck whatsoever.

But for some reason turnips do well for me.

Go figure.

On the other hand, onions, garlic, leeks, other alliums will drive me out if I let 'em.

I have little trouble growing kohlrabi. But it's not really a root crop. The bulb grows above ground; it's really just a swelling of the stem. So long as I keep after the cabbage worms I'm ok.

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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2013 at 14:49
My problem with the kohlrabi was that critters ate it.

I can do at lease one allium- chives. They've grown in my lawn.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2013 at 16:11
I've never heard of salad turnips, but I wish I had a bunch of them in front of me right now? Back in the day, kohlrabi was almost a staple. I remember just eating them like apples. Brook, have you ever over wintered carrots or other root vegetables? I remember flipping over a very think layer of mulch under the snow to uncover carrots, parsnips and parsley roots still in the ground. These went into the chicken soup pot. I remember the carrots being as sweet as candy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2013 at 17:02
I have the same problem with parsnips, Melissa. I used to tell people that venison was how I got to eat my parsnips.

Overwintering in the ground is a fairly common practice throughout North America, Rod. Of course, the further north one goes the thicker the mulch layer has to be. Down here we can usually get away with no mulch, or just a couple of inches, whereas in New England they measure it in feet.

I've not overwintered carrots because, as noted above, I've not had a lot of success growing them. But I've overwintered turnips and parsnips (when the deer leave me some). And my winter radishes remain in the ground, and get harvested as needed.
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