Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > Scandinavia
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Santa Lucia
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Santa Lucia

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4525
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Santa Lucia
    Posted: 14 December 2014 at 08:24
Well, thanks to my ridiculous work schedule I blew it. Yesterday was the 13th, which is Santa Lucia day. In Scandinavia this marks the official start of the Christmas season. I’d intended making saffron buns, which is a traditional way of marking the day.

I’m still alright, though. St Lucy, as she’s also known, is intimately tied to the winter Solstice. Due to changes in calendars and methods of determining the actual Solstice, this ranges from December 13 to December 21. Truth to tell, though, that's just an excuse. Any day is a good day to enjoy these rolls.

Lucy of Syracuse was an early female martyr. Her story is a powerful one, and you can read the whole legend here ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy). Although she died in the third century, it wasn’t until about the sixth century that her sufferings included eye-gouging as part of the story. That’s why most paintings of her include a bowl with two eyes (supposedly her’s) floating in them.

In Sweden, Lusse Brod is baked in celebration of St Lucy’s Day. Known in English as saffron buns, these buns are twisted into a traditional double S pattern, thus representing St Lucy’s eyes.
There are several variations on the Lusse Brod theme. This one is adapted from Ingram and Shapter’s Breads of the World and How To Bake Them at Home:

Lusse Brod
(Swedish Saffron Buns)


½ cup hot milk
Pinch of saffron threads
3 ½ cups white flour
½ cup ground almonds
6 tbls sugar
1 envelope (2 teaspoons) active dry yeast
½ cup lukewarm water
Few drops almond extract
½ cup butter, softened
1 egg
1 tbls water

Prep two baking sheets.

Bring the milk to boil in a small saucepan Add the saffron, remove from the heat, and let infuse for about 15 minutes. Meanwhile combine the flour, almonds, salt and sugar in a large bowl.

In a small bowl, mix the yeast with the water. Add the saffron liquid, yeast mixture, and almond extract to the flour mixture and mix into a dough. Gradually beat in the softened butter.

Turn out dough on a lightly floured surface and kead for about five minutes until smooth and elastic. Place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about an hour.

Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and punch down. Divide into 12 equal pieces and roll each into a long rope. Working from each end, twist the rope into an S shape, with a coil at each end.

Place on the baking sheets, spaced well apart. Cover with greased plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for about 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Beat the egg with the water and brush on the rolls. Bake for 15 minutes or until golden. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8935
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 December 2014 at 08:27
Earlier this year, I fully intended to try these on Sankta Lucia's day, but...life intervened and I forgot, until yesterday afternoon. By then, it was too late, and I barely managed to get some köttbullar made; not exactly a meal geared specifically geared toward her, but still - a Swedish meal in her honour....
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4525
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 December 2014 at 08:34
Although Santa Lucia is canonized in at least five different churches, it's kind of ironic that she's most celebrated in Scandinavia than anywhere else.

I mean we're talking about a rich girl from Italy, with Greek origins.

Anyway, any time during the season would be appropriate for these. So that would give you from right now all the way to January 6 to give them a try.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1051
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 December 2014 at 12:02
They sound delicious!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4525
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2014 at 06:33
That they are, Melissa. Like all enriched breads, a little on the sweet side. But not so much as to be cloying.

Plus it's always fun to make a bread with a story behind it, as most celebration breads do.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1051
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2014 at 18:59
"Celebration breads." I like that."
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4525
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 May 2016 at 06:48
"Celebration breads" is a fairly common designation, Melissa, for breads designed to be served, primarily, on holidays and special occasions. Most cultures have at least one; often several.

I'm wondering, now, if I shouldn't have included a chapter specifically on them in my bread primer?

If there's any interest in that I'll be happy to add it on.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1051
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 May 2016 at 16:43
Sure!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8935
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 June 2016 at 23:43
Please do, Brook - your writing is informative, easy to read and always interesting. Clap
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.