Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > Italy
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Scampi alla Griglia
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Scampi alla Griglia

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Scampi alla Griglia
    Posted: 01 October 2010 at 14:29

I decided to put this in the Italian section, although schrimp scampi as we know it may very well belong in the "American Northeast" section. A little bit of research will demonstrate why:

From "The Food Timeline"

Quote http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodlobster.html#scampi

Scampi has two meanings: the name of a shrimp (Italian word) and the name of the dish. Shrimp scampi, as we Americans know it today, became popular after World War II. This was when many Italian dishes went "mainstream." According to our sources, "scampi" is not one set recipe, but a generic name applied to several dishes variously composed of shrimp. Notes here:

"What is scampi?"...is asked frequently of this department, and a quick check disclosed that it is also asked of fishmongers and Italian restauranteurs. Although the answers received will probably vary with every source consulted, they do fall into two basic categories: a type of shrimp or a preparation of shrimp. Howevever, the ramifications within these two categories are bewildering. In an effort to get an unromantic, unbiased definition of the word; Italian dictionaries of all sizes were consulted. Unfortunately they were peculiarly silent on the subject...Italian cookbooks yielded more relevant, but scarcely more helpful information. Most offered recipes for "scampi" or "shrimp scampi style" and such recipes generally (but not always) called for jumbo shrimp, olive oil, garilc and parsley. "Preparation varies. The methods of cooking, however, varied from boiling to broiling and from frying to baking. Some called for shelling the shrimp in advance; others recommended serving the dish only to "people who are willing to remove the shells at table." Some called for marinating the shellfish in advance; others did not. One even introduced a bread crumb topping. All this would seem to point to the fact that scampi is not, after all, a particular method of preparing shrimp. Some cookbooks and most persons consulted agreed with this and generally (but, again, not always) deveined scampi as shellfish native to the Adriatic (notably the Bay of Venice) that are not available in this country. But the specifications of the shellfish varied from that of a small shrimp to that of a lobster tail and a flavor from similar to Mexican shrimp to unlike anything else. The most authoritative answer came from Mrs. Hedy Giusti-Lanham, who styled herself "practically a scampo--although not quite as pink as I should be--because the best ones come from Venice, where I am from." "Plump little beasts. "What are scampi?" she asked rhetorically..."The are like shrimps in this country, only smaller. The larger ones, like the jumbo here, are called scampi imperali; but the normal scampi are quite small. The are plump little beasts and are quite round when they sit on the plate, because the tails curl in close." "No one where I come from would put a heavy sauce on top, like in shrimp cocktail." she commented. "They are usually thrown into heavy boiling water, then deveined and shelled and served lukewarm. Or they may be broiled by basting the shells with oil and putting them under the broiled or over charcoal and basting them while they cook. The shells get very dark and crack when the inside is done. They are served with their shells on. You put a little olive oil and a little lemon on them as you take them out of the shells, and a little pepper--but no salt. Garlic? Oh, no, no, no. They have such flavor that anything else would be an insult." Asked whether there was a great difference between scampi and American-style shrimp, Mrs. Guisti-Lanhan replied: "They are a similar type of person but the accent is very different."
---"Food News: Italian Ways With Scampi," Nan Ickeringill, New York Times, November 17, 1964 (p. 44)

"Scampi. A Venetian term, dating in English print to 1920, that in America refers to shrimp cooked in garlic, butter, lemon juice, and white wine, commonly listed on menus as "shrimp scampi." The true scampo (scampi is the plural) of Italy is a small lobster or prawn, of the family Nephropidae, which in America is called a "lobsterette.""
---Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. Mariani [Lebhar-Friedman:New York] 1999 (p. 286)

"Scampi. We seem not to have discovered this simple Italian way of cooking shrimp until after World War II. Certainly scampi weren't familiar beyond big metropolitan areas."
---American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes of the 20th Century, Jean Anderson [Clarkson Potter:New York] 1997 (p. 139)
[NOTE: The earliest reference to shrimp scampi in the New York Times is a restaurant advertisement published May 9, 1956 for The Tenakill Restaurant in Englewood NJ]

"In the latter part of the 20th century the Norway lobster became a standard item on British menus, usually under the Italian name scampi. This reflects the fact that Italians in the Adriatic had for long appreciated it, and had many recipes for scampi cooked in this or that way, which became famouns to tourists."
---Oxford Companion to Food, Alan Davidson [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 1999 (p. 541)

"Scampi is the plural of the word scampo, 'shrimp', a word of unkown origin. It started to filter into English in the 1920s, but it was not really until the 1950s and 1960s that it began to make headway. This coincided with a boom in popularity of a dish consisting of large prawn tails coated in breadcrumbs and deep-fried: scampi and chips became a staple on cafe and restaurant menus. Soon scampi had well and truly ousted the native English Dublin Bay prawns."
---An A-Z of Food & Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2003 (p. 303-4)

From WikiPedia:

Quote Scampi is a culinary name for some species of prawn, notably the 'true' scampi Nephrops norvegicus, and is also used as a name for a style of preparation of these lobsters and other seafood. In India, 'freshwater scampi' refers to the shrimp Macrobrachium rosenbergii....In Ireland, the United Kingdom and the USA, the word has come to define the method of preparation rather than the ingredient, although referring to quite different methods.

In the USA, "scampi" is often the menu name for shrimp in Italian-American cuisine (the actual word for "shrimp" in Italian is gambero or gamberetto, plural gamberi or gamberetti[3]). The term "scampi", by itself, is also the name of a dish of shrimp served in garlic butter and dry white wine, served either with bread, or over pasta or rice. The word "scampi" is often construed as that style of preparation rather than an ingredient, with that preparation being called "shrimp scampi", and with variants such as "chicken scampi".

In the UK and Ireland, "scampi" refers to the full flesh of a Norway lobster, deep fried in batter and breadcrumbs. "Whole tail" scampi is always made with Norway lobster, but other seafood such as monkfish tails may be used where this is not stated.

With this information in mind, my guess (and it is a pure guess) that "shrimp scampi" as we know it was never "officially" an Italian dish and that "scampi" in Italy were cooked in a variety of ways, probably including the method that became famous. The post-WW2 timing suggests that it most likely was something brought to the US and "Americanized" by returning GIs or perhaps by Italian POWs who may have worked in restaurants. Perhaps it was eventually served as we know it in a restaurant and the idea caught on. Since it would have been impractical to import true scampi from Italy, whatever shrimp were on hand were used and "scampi" became a designation used to differentiate it from other shrimp items on the menu (and perhaps to make it sound more Italian.)  As the dish was introduced and became popular, it came to be a universally accepted "Italian" dish. As stated earlier, this is all a pure guess, and If anyone finds solid information to refute it, I'll be more than willing to stand corrected.

As for where to place it, I am sure that someone somewhere in Italy prepared it as we've come to know it, and since the original inspiration for it certainly came from Italy, I'll post it in Italy. If anything comes up to designate it as a purely American creation, It's easy enough to move it there!
 
Anyway, now that the background is behind us, Time to look at ideas for preparation. Certainly shrimp, butter and pepper are invovled, with many references to garlic, dry, white wine and lemon juice. Also, it looks like it can be served equally well with pasta, rice or bread. I have all of these ingredients on hand right now, so from this humble genesis, let's see if we can come up with a "quintessential" shrimp scampi, which can be posted here.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2010 at 11:35
Well, my research shows that this is indeed an Italian dish, originating in the Veneto region, which includes the ancient trading centre of Venezia (Venice) and the surrounding area in northeastern Italy.
 
Wiki does a great job (as usual) of describing the region:
 
Quote From Wikipedia:
 
 
Veneto, Latin Venetia, Venetian Vèneto), is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about 4.8 million. Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country....
 
Veneto had been for a millennium an independent state, known as the Venetian Republic, and the region was annexed to Italy in 1866 after brief Austrian and French rule. Its capital was, and still is Venice, which for a period ruled one of the vastest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. Due to this recent annexation to the rest of Italy, most Venetians still have a unique identity, and the Veneto is one of two Italian regions (along with Sardinia) whose inhabitants are officially recognized as being "a people...."
 
Once the heartland of the Venetian Republic, Veneto is today among the wealthiest, most developed and industrialised regions of Italy. Having one of the country's richest historical, natural, artistic, cultural, musical and culinary heritages, it is also the most visited region of Italy, with about 60 million tourists every year (2007). Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian.
 
 
In reading Time/Life's Foods of the World - The Cooking of Italy (1968), I learned that Venice was literally built on food, and came across some dazzling accounts of the Grand Canal in Venice as well as a description of Veneto's place in Italian cuisine:
 
Quote [The modern] traveler steps through the station portals and lo - instead of a teeming, landlocked square, there are half a dozen wide steps stretching the whole length of the building and leading down into water. Along the bottom of the steps, the tall bows of gondolas bob up and down in the choppy wakes of motor boats. Before the eye lies the incredible spectacle of the Grand Canal, which Goethe called "the most beautiful street in the world." It leads to the culinary center of the city, the Piazza San Marco, which Napoleon, another traveler given to superlatives, characterized as the most elegant ballroom in Europe. On the canal, in the piazza itself and in the narrow streets behind the bell tower of St. Mark's basilica are some of the finest restaurants in Europe.
 
Almost all the buildings on the Grand Canal, except the churches and public edifices, are palaces. They remain the substantive evidence of the tremendous riches of Venice, reminders that this, in its medieval heyday, was the most brilliant, the most glittering, the most spectacular city in the world, the city that once "held the gorgeous East in fee." Its wealth and its palaces were built on trade monopolies in what were then rare foods: sugar, salt, pepper, spices, coffee. And the city that supplied these commodities to the rest of European world made lavish use of them at home, establishing a subtle and ingenious school of cooking - a finished cuisine enriched by the contributions from the lands brought under the control of Venice when her riches and power were at their height.
 
Of the three regions associated with Venice, only Veneto, where the city lies, has pure Italian cooking. The cooking of the Trentino-Alto Adige region, to the northwest, once owned by Austria-Hungary, is largely Austro-German. Still farther afield, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, which occupies part of the Dalmatian coast in the neighborhood of Trieste, offers overtones of Austrian, Hungarian, Slavic and Balkan cuisines on its menus. These influences are a natural consequence of the fact that Venice once controlled the entire Yugoslav coast and Trieste was once the Austro-Hungarian Empire's Adriatic seaport.
 
Along with a brief discussion describing scampi in relation to other local crustaceans, FOTW-Italy gives us this:
 
Quote Scampi are served in a seeming infinity of fashions: they can, for instance, be combined with other forms of seafood, in a brodetto, rolled in slices of ham, or boiled, cooled and served with a dressing of olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Scampi can be baked in the oven or fried, or - as I have grown to prefer them over the years - grilled in butter and garlic. The American cook need not be worried about not being able to buy genuine Venetian scampi: anything that can be done with them can also be done with [shrimp available in America].
 
FOTW provides two recipes that can be used to provide a wonderful experience in the traditional scampi of Veneto; Risotto con Scampi (braised rice and shrimp) and Scampi alla Griglia (broiled shrimp with garlic butter). Looking at the ingredients and time we had on hand when I got home from work last night, I chose the latter and have no regrets! I will post the recipe for Risotto con Scampi at a later time; for now, here is the recipe for Scampi alla Griglia:
 
Quote
Scampi alla Griglia
Broiled Shrimp with Garlic Butter
 
To serve 6:
 
2 lbs. large fresh shrimp in their shells or defrosted frozen shrimp
8 Tbsp. (1 quarter-pound stick) of butter
1/2 cup olive oil
1 Tbsp. lemon juice
1/4 cup finely-chopped shallots or scallions
1 Tbsp. finely-chopped garlic
1 tsp. salt
Freshly-ground black pepper
4 Tbsp. finely-chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley
Lemon quarters
 
Shell the shrimp, but be careful not to remove the last small segment of shell or the tail. With a small, sharp knife, slit each shrimp down the back and lift out the black or white intestinal vein. Wash the shrimp quickly under cold running water and pat them thoroughly dry with paper towels.
 
Preheat the broiler to its highest temperature. In a shallow flame-proof baking dish or pan just large enough to hold the shrimp in one layer, melt the butter over low heat, and be careful not to let it brown. Stir in the 1/2 cup of olive oil, lemon juice, shallots, garlic, salt and and a few grindings of pepper, add the shrimp and turn them in the butter and oil until they glisten on all sides. Broil them 3 to 4 inches from the heat for 5 minutes, then turn the shrimp over and broil them for 5 to 10 minites longer, or until they are lightly browned and firm to the touch. Be careful not to overcook them.
 
With tongs, transfer the shrimp to a heated serving platter, pour the sauce from the pan over them, and sprinkle with chopped parsley. Garnish with lemon quarters, and serve.
 
I gave this a try with a couple of modest substitutions (to be explained later), serving it on a bed of angel hair pasta. Results were in the neighbourhood of a home run out of the park and we truly enjoyed this dish! It is a definite do-agin in the our household and I highly recommend it to anyone who is looking for an easy-yet-elegant italian meal.
 
Pictures of preparation etc. to follow!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2010 at 13:05
Outstanding research into scampi and certainly a signature example of why this site is the best around! You have certainly done the homework and set the stage for all the rest of us to have our mouths watering waiting for your pictures.
 
I researched the Culinaria Italy volume and unfortunately it did not have much. Scampo on the Italian mainland is considered to be the tiger shrimp, a large (and sometimes very large) version of what we consider shrimp. In Sicily, scampi are smallish spiny lobsters, about a pound or so apiece. There were only two recipes for scampo in the book, one for fried scampo and the other Scampi a la Zuppetta, which is in a tomato sauce. 
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3414
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 October 2010 at 06:06
Nice work guys.....a very informative post. I'd be dreaming about making garlic shrimp right now if I hadn't eaten all that paella last night Wink
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2010 at 17:06
well, as usual, it took me a while to get these pix posted, but i hope they were worth the wait. while i did fight a bit with the camera, a few shots turned out great and it is my pleasure to share them with you all.
 
this was a very delicious and satisfying meal, made doubly so by the fact that the beautiful mrs. tas also enjoyed it! here's a spread of the goods - take note of my necessary substitutions -
 
 
the "regular" olive oil in the picture was not intended to be used and was replaced by extra-virgin olive oil after the picture was taken so that its full-bodied flavour would stand well with the other bold seasonings. the garlic was grown by some family members in colorado and had very good and robust flavour! the flat-leaf italian parsley was grown by me and cut from my herb garden; considering the time of year, i probably got it just in time!
 
we did not have fresh lemons on hand, so i used bottled lemon juice. this is of course acceptable, but i can only imagine how much more bright this meal would have been had i used fresh lemons and their zest. the same idea applies to the pepper, which in this case was canned, ground black pepper instead of freshly-cracked. it's ok, and the meal tasted fine, but once agian, i would have preferred the latter.
 
here we are, with ingredients measured out as according the the recipe. please note that for this evening, i cut the recipe in half, since it was just the two of us.
 
 
starting at 12 o'clock, we have the butter, olive oil and lemon juice (combined), onion, chopped fine, then garlic, also chopped fine, salt and pepper, then finally the fresh parsley, chopped fine.
 
since we had no scallions/green onions/spring onions (pick your term), i chose a nice, white onion that substituted very well, the only thing lacking was the extra colour and maybe a few subtle flavours - no big deal. keep in mind that good cooking is what you make of it and it is surprising and gratifying to see the wonderful flavours that you can get with different combinations of very common ingredients.
 
preparation is as easy as it gets. there really is no excuse NOT to make this. read on to see for yourself!
 
simply melt the butter in the bottom of a baking dish or other heat proof pan (do it in a way that does not brown the butter!), then add the olive oil, onion, garlic, salt and pepper:
 
 
next, toss in the shrimp:
 
 
a word about the shrimp: due to budget and availablility, we used these frozen shrimp and the meal was very fine. keep in mind that they should be thawed and patted dry with a peper towel; i am not sure how necessary this is, but the recipe recommended it, so it was done. the drawback is that they are pre-cooked, but careful broiling in the oven will yield great results; mine were not completely thawed, so i ended up broiling them for a little longer and i am sure they shrunk a little because of this. for an anniversary or other special evening i would have splurged and tried to get bigger, fresh shrimp, but that is hard to do in montana, so this is what we used. taste did not suffer for it!
 
stir the shrimp carefully in the seasonings to coat each shrimp well:
 
 
and then arrange them in a single layer in the bottom of the baking dish.
 
after broiling on both sides, they looked very succulent, in my opinion:
 
 
i really loved the toasty-brown hue that they took on. and was entranced by the rich, buttery aroma coming up from the baking dish!
 
i served the scampi on a simple bed of angel-hair pasta that was lightly flavoured with and tossed in about half as much alfredo sauce as i would normally use. the alfredo sauce was simply a jarred sauce from ragu, of the "quattro formaggio" variety rather than strictly parmesan - very good stuff and convenient. it did a wonderful job of providing a backdrop for the scampi, which was the intended star of the meal.
 
 
the leftover broiling "sauce" in the bottom of the baking dish had acquired a wonderful oniony, garlicky, lemony taste, accented by the salt and pepper and carried very well by the butter and olive oil. this made a perfect drizzle over the top of the shrimp and pasta before the parsley garnish was added, and supplemented the alfredo very well.
 
as i said before, i fought a bit with the camera this evening, and it shows in some shots, but in other shots, it is amazing what i could do given the cheap camera i have. for instance, i never could get a satisfactory picture of both plates together, so i experimented a bit with just one plate using different angles and focal points and got some interesting results. i couldn't decide between these last three shots, so pick your favourite:
 
 
 
 
thanks for looking, and i hope you give this a try. if so, please let me know what you thought of it!
 
 
 
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3414
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2010 at 17:13
That's basically the way I used to make it for the boys at the firehouse Ron.
I didn't use alfredo sauce, but the shrimp were literally swimming in melted butter, extra virgin olive oil, shallots and garlic, then broiled about 4 inches from the flame for three minutes, flip and broil for two mintes, then serve over pasta or rice. My guys tended to prefer the rice.

I'm going to have to make this again soon...you've got me pumped for it

You did an outstanding job my friend...oh, by the way I liked picture number 2 the best.
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 680
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2010 at 17:24
That looks delicious, Ron.  I have to stop at the grocery store before picking up my son from football practice here in a minute and now I think I'll get some shrimp while I'm there. 
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2010 at 17:30

thanks so far for the comments guys - dave, the alfredo was really a "backup" plan in case there wasn't much sauce in the bottom of the shrimp baking dish. i used only half as much as normal so that there would be some flavour to the pasta but mainly i wanted to showcase the shrimp and any sauce that might be left. i figured that if there wasn't enough sauce in the shrimp, the alfredo might cover up the deficiency

as it turned out, there were no worries on that front, and the two together worked very well!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2010 at 17:49
Ron, you did fine! That's an excellent wonderful dinner and the folks above concur. No need to feel short on anything - especially the scallions. Scallions might be critical in scallion soup or a mild creamy recipe but for this and most others you can substitute onions any day and have a party! Personally, I think scallions are over-rated. Even for soup. (An aside challenge for anyone out there Smile )
 
Loved the broiling pic...wow my mouth was atering and I could smell the deliciousness. VBery nice and the plated pics were perfect! You can't make better than this and you hit this baby out of the ballpark!
 
By the way, the regular jarred sauces make outstanding "bases" for top-notch meals like you just demonstrated. Be proud of your success with it Ron, eveyone does it and makes fine upstanding feasts at home with them....why else would they sell!
 
Big congratulations on your scampi. You sure make me want to do same this weekend!  WOW!  Clap
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2010 at 18:44
thanks, john! i agree about the onions, but i do like the colour provided by scallions, even though i prefer "regular" onions or shallots for flavour.
 
well, guys, it looks like at least three members are giving this a try soon - can't wait to see the pix!Tongue
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 680
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2010 at 19:35
Looks pretty darn good to me, I use jarred sauces all the time, BTW.  I just picked up the ingredients and will be making it here in the next few days.  Mrs. Andy is fanatical about having shrimps perfectly de-veined so I will be going to some work to shell and de-vein fresh gulf shrimp but that's okay.

Now you've also got me hungry for my shrimp and grits which we haven't had in a while so I'll make that and post it up too.

You did real good, Ron!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 August 2011 at 15:49
hey, andy - i know this was a while ago, but did you give it a go? how was it?
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 680
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 August 2011 at 16:54
Ha!!!  How timely!

Funny you should bump this thread, I just made it last night!  My wife came home with a two pound chunk of fresh butter she picked up at a farmers' market in North Georgia on Saturday and I thought this would be a good use for some of the butter.  About the only things I did differently were I substituted rice, cooked with the same fresh butter and in chicken stock then tossed with some green peas in place of the pasta, and I sauteed the shrimp and garlic in the butter and EVOO and when the shrimp were done I removed them and deglazed the pan with extra dry vermouth and a shot of lemon juice and then poured the sauce over the shrimp.  Marvelous dish and easy, too!  Thanks for posting.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 August 2011 at 16:56
oh boy, oh boy, andy ~ that does sound wonderful! glad you liked it!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6082
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2013 at 13:26
Tas.
 
Truly lovely work ... Coming from an Italian 50% and a full blooded Italian 100%, this is a true compliment. Your research is exemplary.
 
Scampi are quite different in shape and are not found in North American waters.
 
They are common fare in Italia and España. I had posted some photos of them, on my variation on the renowned recipe last week and the recipe is called SHRIMP SCAMPI WITH ANGEL HAIR.
 
Our recipes are quite similar though I employ white wine ... And like Hoser comibine Evoo with a very tiny amount of French butter. Very delicious looking pictorial.
 
Kind regards.
Margi.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2013 at 13:38
Hi, Margi -
 
this is indeed an excellent recipe ~ a little white wine and of course olive oil would only make it better, i think! perhaps a few red pepper flakes too ~
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6082
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2013 at 13:45
Tas. Definitely white wine; red pep. Flakes and Evoo from Italy and angel hair or cappellini a very fine ribbon pasta ... Though linguini works too. Great research on Venezia and Veneto province.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6082
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2013 at 13:48
Tas. I posted my grandmother's and shall study the two. On list ... They are quite similar. I love ur feature. Great job. When i make i will pictorial it.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2013 at 13:51
I really liked the capellini ~ it seemed perfect for the shrimp.
 
My wife really enjoys any version of this dish, and has me make it often. Sometimes we also add crab, and almost always it is with some form of alfredo, quattro formaggio or other white, cheesy-and-garlicky sauce, which seems to be closely associated with the Veneto province along with rich, buttery good stuff.Tongue
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6082
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2013 at 14:01
Tas. It is a very elegant dish and served on Port Venezia. Cappellini is light and does pair perfectly ... I use fresh lemon and s a tiny shallot ... Shall be preparing after 5th.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.