Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > The British Isles
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Shepherd's Pie
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Shepherd's Pie

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
SavageShooter View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 19 December 2011
Location: Kansas City
Status: Offline
Points: 43
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SavageShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Shepherd's Pie
    Posted: 11 June 2012 at 14:29
I'd like to find a truly authentic recipe for Shepherd's Pie.  Any help or posts would be appreciated. 
Common sense is not all that common.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 June 2012 at 14:57

Here's this, from about.com. If/when I find something that is certified authentic, I'll post it; however, about.com has been pretty reliable in the past for reasonably-authentic regional cuisine.

Quote Shepherd's Pie

One of the quickest and easiest supper dishes is...shepherds pie.... Traditionally the pie is made with ground lamb, but if using ground beef it would be called a Cottage Pie....however, the recipe is the same for both.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutesIngredients:
Serves 6

2 lb / 900g potatoes, peeled and quartered
6 tbsp milk
1 stick / 110g butter, cubed + 1 tbsp for the sauce
Salt and ground black pepper
1/2 tbsp lard or dripping
1 cup/ 115g chopped onion
1 cup / 115g finely diced carrot
1 clove garlic, minced
2 cups / 450g ground/ minced lamb
1 pint / 600 ml beef stock
1 cup / 115g chopped white mushrooms
2 tbsp finely chopped flat leaf parsley
1 tbsp all-purpose flour
1 cup/ 115g grated Cheddar Cheese

Heat the oven to 375°F/190°C/Gas 5

Boil the potatoes until soft then drain into a colander. Place the milk and butter in the pan used to boil the potatoes, return to the heat and warm gently until the butter has melted. Add the potatoes and mash. Season to taste and keep to one side.

Melt the lard or dripping in a large deep pan. Add the onion and carrot and fry for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another minute.

Add the ground lamb and one-third of the beef stock to the onion and carrot mixture and cook, stirring constantly until all the meat is browned. Add the remaining stock, parsley and mushrooms, season with salt and pepper. Cover with a lid and cook for 15 minutes.

Mash the flour into the remaining 1 tbsp butter then add in small pieces to the ground meat sauce, stirring until all the flour has dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, approx 5 mins.

Place the meat sauce into an 8"X 3"/ 20cm X 7cm deep ceramic of glass ovenproof dish and cover with the mashed potato. Sprinkle the grated cheese on top of the potato and bake in the heated oven for 30 - 35 mins until the surface is crisp and browned. Serve immediately.
 
Also, this is very similar to a recipe we've been making at our house for over 20 years, which we call hamburger pie; if you're interested, here's a link:
 
http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/hamburger-pie_topic1055.html
 
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 673
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 June 2012 at 15:27
I have made the following which is from Gordon Ramsay.  It is very good the only change I make is I use beef instead of lamb.  There's a you youtube at the bottom of the page where he shows how to make it.

http://gordonramsaysrecipes.com/03/shepherd-pie/
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5670
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 02:33

Buon Giorno, Gentlemen,

I have prepared the Gordon Ramsey version that Boilermaker has recommended and it is quite delicious ... I prefer Beef version personally ... 
 
Also, note: UK Chef Jaime Oliver also has a lovely recipe.
 
I had wanted to mention, I am not a fan of any orange or yellow type cow variety (Cheddar) Cheese, and Gordon´s recipe DOESN´T EMPLOY any cheese in his Shepherd´s Pie ... It is not traditional to add cheese to a Shepherd´s Pie.
 
Have a lovely Tuesday,
Margi. Thumbs Up
 
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 381
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 03:32
Ramsay's recipe most definitely does include cheese.  In fact, he explicitly says in the video that Parmesan is a key ingredient. 
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4130
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 06:17
This entire group of "pies" is hallmarked by having a mashed potato crust; technically, Shepherd's Pie must be made with lamb. If you use beef or other meat, the same method produces a Cottage Pie. And, in some locales, if you use venison it is called a Deerstalker Pie.
 
I happen to enjoy Ramsay's version. But the fact is, it is not traditional on several levels.
 
There is no cheese in the traditional Shepherd's Pie. And it originally was made with diced lamb, rather than chopped (or "minced" as the Brits would say).
 
However, Shepherd's Pie is peasant food in its truest sense, so the idea that there is just one  "right" or "authentic" version is a silly conceit at best.
 
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
SavageShooter View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 19 December 2011
Location: Kansas City
Status: Offline
Points: 43
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SavageShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 06:26
Thanks to everyone who's provided input.  I'm going to give Ramsey's version a try but won't be using Lamb.  I will however be using Venison, so I guess I should have asked for Deerstalker Pie.  All I know is that I've been craving a good Shepherds Pie.  I'll post my results and let everyone know how it turned out.

Thanks again,
Common sense is not all that common.
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5670
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 08:10
1) Mashed Potato Topping ( which is the key to a Shepherd´s Pie ) 
 
2) I dislike orange and yellow cow variety cheeses, and thus, I would not employ them in the FILLING of a Shepherd´s  Pie ...
 
3) Reggiano Parmesano Cheese is employed  more as a Spice to provide for flavour to the bland mashed potato topping, than as a cheese in the Italian sense of Cheese;
however, I used Sage instead ...  
 
4) Gordon has numerous cookbooks ( www.amazon.com ) and the same for Jaime Oliver. I had honestly forgotten, since it is not one of our dishes I make often enough and it is an autumn winter dish, my recipe is Jaime Oliver´s and here are the ingredients:
 
Beef:
2 tblsps. olive oil
Four 8 ounce beef tenderlion steaks about 1 1/4 " thick
 
Potato Topping:
1 ten ounce to twelve ounce potato
1 tblsp. unsalted butter
1 tsp. dried sage
1 egg yolk
 
Stuffing or Filling:
1/4 stick butter
6 oz. chopped fresh mushrooms of choice
2 shallots
1 leek chopped
1/2 onion finely chopped
2 tsps. dried thyme
1/4 cup Madeira Wine from Portugal
 
Have a nice evening,
Margaux Cintrano.  
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 7882
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 09:24
carl - hey, i'm glad you found a recipe you like and want to try. let us know how it turns out; looking forward to seeing it! Clap
 
alright, so there is no pastry crust in shepherd's pie - moving forward....i think at this point we can agree on a few things: shepherd's pie (lamb) and cottage pie (beef) and deerstalker pie (venison) are all very similar to the point where they are pretty much the same thing, using different meats.
 
i know that wikipedia is not the final word in any research, let alone food research; however, i picked up some interesting information there:
 
Quote Cottage pie or shepherd's pie is a meat pie with a crust of mashed potato.
 
 
The term cottage pie is known to have been in use in 1791, when the potato was being introduced as an edible crop affordable for the poor (cf. "cottage" meaning a modest dwelling for rural workers).
 
In early cookery books, the dish was a means of using leftover roasted meat of any kind, and the pie dish was lined with mashed potato as well as having a mashed potato crust on top.
 
The term "shepherd's pie" did not appear until 1877, and since then it has sometimes (incorrectly) been used synonymously with "cottage pie," regardless of whether the principal ingredient was beef or mutton. The term "shepherd's pie" should be used when the meat is mutton or lamb, with the origin being that shepherds are concerned with sheep and not cattle. This may, however, be an example of folk etymology
 
What I found intersting was the wide lsiting of variatioons and similar dishes covering a wide geographic area:
 

Quote The Cumberland pie is a version with a layer of bread crumbs on top.
A similar English dish made with fish is a fish pie.
A vegetarian version (occasionally named "Shepherdless Pie") can be made using soya or other meat substitutes (like tofu or Quorn), or legumes such as lentils or chickpeas.
In Bolivia and Chile a similar dish is called "pastel de papa (potato pie).
In Uruguay and Argentina a regional variant exists, also called Shepherd's Pie and made with lamb.
In the Dominican Republic this is called pastelón de papa (potato casserole), it has a layer of potatoes, one or two of meat, and another of potatoes, topped with a layer of cheese.
In France, a similar dish is called hachis Parmentier.
In Jordan, Syria and Lebanon a similar dish is referred to as "Siniyet Batata" (literally meaning a plate of potatoes), or "Kibbet Batata".
In Quebec, a similar dish is called pâté chinois (literally, "Chinese paste").
In Russia, a similar dish is called "Картофельная запеканка" (Kartofel'naya zapekanka, or "potato baked pudding").
In Brazil a similar dish is called "Escondidinho" (literally meaning "Hidden").
In Portugal a similar dish is called "Empadão," with two layers of mashed potatoes and a layer of minced beef in between.
In the Low Countries, a similar dish is called "Filosoof".
In Finland, a similar dish is called "lihaperunasoselaatikko," with the mince (e.g. mix of pork/beef) mixed thoroughly with the potato mash.

 
it seems to me that a person can get as rustic or as uptown as they want with this and still amke a good, authentic dish, as long as there is at least a layer of some kind of meat mixture (minced or ground) and a layer of mashed potatoes on top. going from that base, if a person wants to get historic about it, they can make a layer of mashed potatoes on the bottom, too. from what i can see, any vegetables (or mushrooms) added should be local, in season and inexpensive, and cheese on top is optional. common herbs such as thyme and perhaps parsley can be assumed, as well as onion and possibly a clove or two of garlic. beyond that, the dish goes a little uptown, but is still acceptable as shepherd's/cottage/deerstalker pie. 
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5670
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 09:34
Tas,
 
Thanks for the all the interesting variations of numerous countries on the Shepherd´s  Pie.
 
Ciao.
Margaux.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 766
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 09:55
Just wanted to chime in my little piece here... 

sometimes it's good to remember that not all of our members here have English as a first language and sometimes it's hard to come up with the right words. Also often times a thing will mean one thing in one culture but something entirely different in another. There's been plenty of times when I've been reading a post (not just here, but on other boards too) and thinking to myself, WTF is he/she saying? But you have to remember that we're an international community and sometimes things don't come out exactly as the poster intended them to.

Anyway, as to shepherd's pie, I can't say that I've ever had it, but it sure looks good. I might have to give it a try. Though my wife abhors eating lamb (and i love it) so my version will apparently have to be cottage pie.
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5670
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 10:10
 
Buonasera Pitrow,
 
Thanks for your note ...
 
I have to tell you that I am and I am not a foreigner, I am a native Manhattaner because I was born and raised in Manhattan, however, I married an Italian and we have been living in Europe since 1992 ... having two apartments, a rental for professional purposes in Madrid Capital, Spain and a Condo we own in Puglia, Italy. I speak five in a half languages, and The Vet speaks 4 ...
 
Some times we forget what things are called in English ... I am a publishing journalist however, shepherd´s beef pie with mash potato topping is not exactly a common dish in our apartment. We are Mediterranean in background, and our diets are veered to the Mediterranean.
 
I am sure your wife will like it, if you prepare it with Beef ( I use steak tenderloin for mine ) and lovely mushrooms ... and a lovely red wine or Lambrusco sparkling Italian wine or Cava ...
 
It is a nice autumn and winter dish ...
 
Kind regards.
Margaux Cintrano.
 
 
 
 
 
I make mine with beef ...
 
 
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 766
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 10:32
Margi, I wasn't calling you out specifically, I meant it in a general way because of some other posts I've seen, just seemed like a fitting place to mention it. Sorry if you took it that way. I meant it more as a "before you post a reply, take a minute to think about it" kind of thing.

I guess my thinking falls along these lines....



It's rather funny that someone just posted this on facebook, given the discussion here. In my way of thinking the image above is a great guideline when posting too.



Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5670
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 10:55
Buonasera Pitrow,
 
I should be more careful in proof reading posts ... This is a must do ...
 
I consider you a Gentleman, so take it as a compliment. 
 
Take care,
Ciao. Margaux.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5670
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2012 at 10:57
Tas and Pitrow,
 
Great Point !  Is it inspiring, is it helpful, is it kind ?
 
This is exactly what I am referring to ...
 
Thanks for posting and sharing.
This should be the Forum Mission Statement !
 
Margaux.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
SavageShooter View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 19 December 2011
Location: Kansas City
Status: Offline
Points: 43
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SavageShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 June 2012 at 06:58
Here was my first attempt at making a "Shepherd's Pie" although mine was a hybrid "Deerstalker/PigSlayer Pie" if there is such a thing.

I didn't measure anything out...I prefer to season my dishes to taste so off I go.  First things first, I had my Venison from this last hunting season and I decided to through in some spicy sausage from a feral pig I hunted back in April.  It's a lot of meat, but I only used about 1/2 of it so I can make some chili in the next day or two with the leftover protein.   I also got all my "Mince" ready before hand.  What I have there is roughly 3 carrots, 1 small white onion, 6 cloves of garlic.  (Thanks to my little food processor)

  
Next browned the meat...

Venison & Sausage - both wild game

Started chopping my fresh Rosemary and Thyme

Checking progress of the protein while it's browning...

Looking mostly done, let this brown up for another 3 or 4 minutes, then off it came an into it's own metal bowl for future usage.  The next step, 1 splash of cooking oil and in went my Mince and fresh spices.
Let it sit for a minute in this state until I could smell my spices at the bottom of the mix.  Then I went to cooking it down and when it looked like this, I added the red wine.
 
Now for the wine.  I'd say that I used about 1/4 cup of wine...

At this point I added some beef broth and tomato paste as well.  I'd say about 1/2 cup of beef broth and about 1/3 of a can of tomato paste.  Didn't want too much tomato taste to it.  The rest of the paste will go into the future chili anyway...waste not want not.

Cooked this down until I thought I had most of the fluids gone.

This is where I made my mistake...so pay heed.  Cook all the fluids off if you want your pie to come out and hold it's shape.  I should have given this another 4-5 minutes to cook off, but I was hungry and wanted to try this dish.  Next time, I'm even considering mixing in about a teaspoon of corn starch in my beef broth to help the process along and it will gel up a little helping keep the desired shape.

Here is the mix in the porcelain baking dish, about ready to get the "taters"...

Now being that I wanted to eat this now!  I opted for instant spuds.  Takes all but 2 minutes to make and they turned out great.  Grated up some Parmesan cheese to mix in like Gordon Ramsay suggests.

Covered the mince, put in the oven at 350 for about 15 minutes and here is what it looked like when it came out.

You'll notice a little missing on the side...I had to give the mash a little taste as it had been smelling so good.  Well, I didn't take any pictures of it served up because like I said...cook the excess moisture off the mince.  As when I served this into bowls, it lost all shape and form.  Although it didn't affect the flavor or the fact that it was gone in 20 minutes...

The wife & daughter whom both hate venison, went back for seconds.  It was a success!  

Notes for my future cooking of this dish.
  • I used beef broth instead of chicken broth, excellent switch in my opinion and I will add in 1 tsp of corn starch to get my mince to thicken/gel a little to help hold it's shape.
  • I will use garlic salt to season the mash when I add the butter and cheese to it and also add some chives.
  • I will also mince up some Zucchini to add to the mix, since my garden is full of it.
I enjoyed this dish and hope you all give it a try yourselves.
Common sense is not all that common.
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 673
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 June 2012 at 09:49
Well done!  I'll bet it was fantastic made from venison and sausage.  Yum!  You just made me very hungry.
Back to Top
SavageShooter View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 19 December 2011
Location: Kansas City
Status: Offline
Points: 43
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SavageShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 June 2012 at 12:50
It was way better than I had anticipated it would be, that's for sure.  It was ugly in the bowl, but I wasn't putting it on display.  Wink
Common sense is not all that common.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4130
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 June 2012 at 16:05

Really nice tutorial, and an interesting variation on the theme.

If you're concerned about neatness, next time leave an opening in the spuds. Doesn't have to be much, an inch or so in the center. Any "spillage" (well, most of it) will well up through the hole. Some will spread out over the mash. But much of it will drain back down into the pie.
 
When making this sort of dish I mostly make them as individual portions. That way I don't have to worry about them hold their shape. The ramakin does that for me.
 
What sort of spices did you use in the wild pork?
Back to Top
africanmeat View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 January 2012
Location: south africa
Status: Offline
Points: 913
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 June 2012 at 03:03
It is a great tutorial ,thanks, i will have to do it one day.
Ahron
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.