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Shrimp Coconut Soup

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14 September 2018 at 10:25
Shrimp Coconut Soup

From Culinaria: the Caribbean (1999):

Quote The beautiful islands of St. Vincent and the Grenadines provide those who prefer to travel by yacht with breathtaking views at both dawn and sunset. On the shores are secluded beaches, natural waterfalls, and rainforests rich with wildlife, as well as colorful markets and historical sights. The charter industry could not ask for more.

Yachting cuisine is an art unto itself, gourmet meals prepared in the confines of a tiny galley. But the waters are teeming with delicacies: fish, lobsters, octopus and eel; and whatever the seas cannot provide, the markets and water taxis can[, including shrimp].


This recipe, also from Culinaria, is found in the chapter on St. Vincent and the Grenadines and was part of the menu of a charter yacht named Dabulamanzi:

Quote Shrimp Coconut Soup


Photo Credit: https://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/mm/image?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcdn-image.myrecipes.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fstyles%2Fmedium_2x%2Fpublic%2Fimage%2Frecipes%2Foh%2Fclfffwn%2Fcoconut-shrimp-stew-oh-x.jpg

To serve 2:

3 cloves garlic
1/2 teaspoon roasted coriander seeds
1 cube chicken bouillon
1.25-inch (4 cm) square of fresh ginger, shredded
1 cup (500 ml) coconut milk
2 ounces (60 ml) water
Zest of 1/2 lime OR 5 or 6 lime leaves
1 sprig of lemon grass
2 small slices of seeded red hot peppers

1/2 pound (250 g) shrimp, peeled
A small handful of basil, finely chopped

Bring all the ingredients (except the shrimp and the basil) to a boil and then simmer for 15 minutes.

Add the shrimp to the soup, cook for 2 to 3 minutes and serve garnished with basil.
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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2018 at 14:31
Sounds great! 
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2018 at 14:40
I thought so too, Mike - I'd like to make it, if I can ever get my hands on some lemon grass.

One substitution I would make would be to use a cube of glace de viande from chicken, rather than a bouillon cube; It's so easy to make, using this procedure:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/glace-de-viande_topic1100.html

Dave uses beef in that tutorial, but chicken works just as well.

If by chance I had no glace available, I'd go with the roasted chicken variety of Better than Bouillon.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2018 at 15:51
Glace de viande has always been on my list of things to try, however I always seem to forget to ask about bones when I'm in the grocery store. It's funny the way things work out, in that in your small town you can find soup and dog bones no problem, but despite the plethora of foods available here (I'm pretty sure I could find lemongrass without any effort) bones just aren't one of them. Seems that around here most people just aren't into the old school food traditions and opt for the easy path of buying ready made stocks and broths. In fact, we don't even have a real butcher in this area. I have to drive at least 30 minutes to find a real butcher. The ones here in the grocery stores simply open boxes of already processed cuts and repackage them into consumer packaging. It's possible they could order me some soup bones but I never remember to ask.
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2018 at 19:29
Problem is, Mike, that most groceries and supermarkets no longer break-down proteins. They buy them in their final forms.

What this translates to is that things like bones, as such, are no longer readily available. And when they are, they're incredibly expensive. I mean, six dollars and change for bones. You know, bones.

Don't know this for sure, but I suspect the bones are sent to the folks who make commercial stocks. Lord knows, there are enough makes and models out there.

Chicken isn't a problem. I save bones and scraps in the freezer, until I have enough to make a load. But we don't eat all that much beef, here. And it's mostly the kinds that don't have bones I could save.

Fortunately, venison makes a good brown stock. Otherwise I have not choice but to buy bases.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2018 at 09:36
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Problem is, Mike, that most groceries and supermarkets no longer break-down proteins. They buy them in their final forms.

What this translates to is that things like bones, as such, are no longer readily available. And when they are, they're incredibly expensive. I mean, six dollars and change for bones. You know, bones.

Don't know this for sure, but I suspect the bones are sent to the folks who make commercial stocks. Lord knows, there are enough makes and models out there.

Chicken isn't a problem. I save bones and scraps in the freezer, until I have enough to make a load. But we don't eat all that much beef, here. And it's mostly the kinds that don't have bones I could save.

Fortunately, venison makes a good brown stock. Otherwise I have not choice but to buy bases.


That is exactly the problem here, the "butchers" merely repackage bulk products. That said, this morning I stopped at a grocery store by work to find something for lunch and happened upon a little chest freezer full of marrow bones. Now mind you, this is a commercially packaged product and not stemming from a local butcher, but still I found it amusing given what I had just written yesterday. $2.99/lb wasn't too bad in my book, so I picked up two packages that came to just shy of 4 pounds total.

Anyway, now that we've totally derailed Ron's coconut shrimp soup I can finally say there will be some glace de viande in my future.
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2018 at 11:42
One more shot, and we can return to the regularly scheduled thread:

Mike, were it me, I would roast the marrow bones. Two reasons: first, the marrow is delicious, and you don't want to waste it (or make the stock too greasy). Second, roasted bones (and, in fact, other ingredients) always make a richer, more full-bodied stock.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 September 2018 at 08:22
No worries about "hijacking" the thread, guys - this is one of the great things about a discussion forum: you can pick up useful knowledge everywhere!

Mike, be sure to let us know how it goes when you make it...my personal opinion is that making glace de viande is a great way for people to see some possibilities that they might not have considered before. All of those bits and bobs; scraps left over from trimming aromatics, skeletons from chickens (or other proteins) that have been bought whole on sale and then broken down for the freezer, and so on. No need to throw them away...put them to good use, and create something wonderful while you're at it!
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