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Smoked Pork Bánh Bao

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gracoman View Drop Down
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    Posted: 29 January 2015 at 19:41
Bánh Bao (literally “wrapped in cake”) is the Vietnamese take on Chinese Baozi or steamed bun. It was brought to Viet Nam by Cantonese immigrants having been invented during the hardship days of old China to feed the ordinary people.  Viet Nam embraced these buns and they are extremely popular.  Pork is the most popular filling. You can usually find chinese sausage, chopped mushrooms and hard cooked eggs in there somewhere.  Here’s my first attempt with ground smoked pork shoulder.

The filling, ground pork mix surrounded by slices of Chinese sausage, and topped with half a hard cooked egg sitting on rolled dough.


I didn't do the best job wrapping them.  I need some more practice.


Into the steamer they go


Finished and cut in half


These tasty buns may be eaten as a snack or light meal.  They are portable,  freeze very well, and come back with just a short visit to the microwave if you don’t care to break out the steamer again.


 

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Hoser View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 January 2015 at 02:24
They sure look awesome G man....do you normally serve a dipping sauce or anything with them?Thumbs Up
Go ahead...play with your food!
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gracoman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 January 2015 at 05:24
Just eat them as is and you'll be a happy guy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 January 2015 at 06:44
I could definitely learn to love those - they look great sitting there in that steamer!

Are any seasonings in particular used?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 January 2015 at 10:09
Things have gotten very busy around here.  Guess I forgot to post the recipe I used Embarrassed  There are many, many ways to make these so I just chose one.

For the dough I used a packaged Bôt Bánh Bao mix from my local Asian mkt because the simple ingredients were unadulterated, it was easy, and the store’s owner said that’s what she uses. The dough may steam up fluffier when freshly made.

For the filling:
1 lb minced pork
10 g dried shiitake mushrooms rehydrated and minced              
10 g  dried woodear mushrooms rehydrated and minced   
1 tbsp minced shallot
1 tbsp  minced garlic
1 tbsp oyster sauce
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
½ tsp black pepper
1/2 cup diced onion
4 Chinese sausages thinly sliced on the diagonal
4 hard cooked eggs peeled and halved lengthwise

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients for the filling (except Chinese sausages and eggs). Mix well and let marinate for 30 minutes. Then divide in to 8 equal balls.

To shape the bun, place one piece of dough on a floured surface, roll it out to form a 1cm thick disk with the edges thinner than the center. Place 1 filling ball in the center, gather up the edges around the filling, bring together and twist securely. Place the shaped bun onto squares of parchment paper and let them rise for 15 more minutes in a warm place before steaming.

Steam for 25 minutes. Remember to wrap the lid of the steamer with a large and thick kitchen towel to avoid water from dropping onto the buns.  If you are using a metal steamer, wrap the lid of the steamer with a kitchen towel to prevent moisture from dripping onto the buns.  A bamboo steamer does not have this issue.

The buns can be stored in the fridge up to a week and in the freezer for months. Steam again (5-10 mins) or microwave (2 minutes) if to eat on the next days.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 February 2015 at 19:03
Nice - thanks for posting! 

A few of the specialised ingredients are out of my reach (those specific mushrooms and Chinese sausages), but I'm sure that acceptable substitutes can be found.
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