Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Asia > The Middle East
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Sometimes You Just Fall Into It
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Sometimes You Just Fall Into It

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4758
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Sometimes You Just Fall Into It
    Posted: 17 September 2019 at 22:07
So, Friend Wife's clothes dryer went kaput, and we've been using a commercial laundrimat to dry clothing.

Turns out, the one we've been patronizing is owned by an immigrant Turkish family.  Mama and I got to talking about food, and we've been exchanging recipes, food, and all things culinary.  

Y'all remember my thread on Ottoman foodways? While that level of food is good, it is, at base, palace food.  It's nice, for a change, to explore the actual things a housewife---in this case a Turkish housewife--prepares at home.

Right off, for instance, she shared some lentil & bulgur kofte with me.  Delicious little bites, that appear in none of the five or six Turkish cookbooks on my shelves.

Here's hoping for a long, fattening friendship. 
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4758
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 September 2019 at 02:09
Susan, my new best friend, shared another Turkish delicacy with me. It's called tarhana, and is the basis for what may be the most popular soup in Turkey, particularly in the mountainous regions, such as Anatolia.

Tarhana looks like very course cornmeal, or, perhaps bulgur.  But what it is is a mixture of yogurt, flour, spices, and vegetables that is fermented, then allowed to dry (traditionally in the sun), and ground to consistency. 

This mixture is dissolved in boiling water or stock, often with the addition of other veggies and some tomato paste, to make the actual soup.  One references says this might be the original instant soup. 

Susan gave me a pint jar of the stuff, which should last some time, as only a few spoonsfull of the mixture are used at a time.  I haven't had a chance to actually try the soup, yet, but I'm looking forward to it. 
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
gracoman View Drop Down
Chef
Chef


Joined: 09 August 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 817
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 September 2019 at 19:28
You got me going with this one. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7Sq7VKWAfo
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6202
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 September 2019 at 04:01


Historic Foodie,

Wow.  This is phenomenal .. 

What a  surprise one can encounter in a laundry-mat  !!

Look forward to hearing all about the soup.

Best wishes for a lovely weekend. 
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6202
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 September 2019 at 04:16


Gracoman and Brook,

Thank you for posting the Video, Gracoman.

Wow.  Quite exceptional ..  Though very laborious and 12 days worth of labor.

I have been to Turkey back in the 1990s and the base (red and Green horn shaped capscicum, parsley, mint, yogurt, tomatoes ) are common ingredients in a large variety or Turkish dishes. 

Good luck with the Project  !!!  


Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
gracoman View Drop Down
Chef
Chef


Joined: 09 August 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 817
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 September 2019 at 08:36
Active time doesn't seem like all that much and I'm thinking my Ankarsrum and 9 tray Excalibur dehydrator will make short work of this.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4758
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 September 2019 at 06:53
Fortunately, the hard part was done for me. Thumbs Up
I'm planning on making the actual soup today, and will file a report.  Rest of the meal will be Caspian Sweet & Sour Chicken Kababs, Susan's lentil/bulgur kofte, and an olive salad.  

Those kababs cryk out for chelow, but I don't think I have enough time to do it all. 
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4758
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 September 2019 at 20:52
The meal was a near perfect as could be.  

As to the soup: All I can say is, where has this been all my life.  Initially I was concerned that the yogurt would be overpowering. But such is not the case. There is just enough tartness to perk it up, but not that deep-sour which sometimes happens.

With no additions, it's almost like a heavy consomme, if that makes sense.  It lacks the clarity, of course. But is, in general terms, light and refreshing. Friend Wife wondered if it wouldn't make a good summertime cold soup. If this heat wave continues, I might even give that a try.

I served it, this time, as a hot appetizer, before the main meal.  

Susan, my Turkish lady friend, usually adds chicken and additional veggies when she makes it. I can certainly see that. And other additions as well.  

The recipe I used calls for either water or stock. I used poultry stock, cuz of it's rich flavor.  Rehydration uses time, with this recipe, so you have to remember to set the tarhana up to soak a couple of hours ahead of time.  And, as all the recipes I looked at stress, you have to monitor it, stirring all the time, to prevent any solids from settling on the bottom of the pot. 

All in all, a great addition to my soup collection; one that we'll be enjoying often. 


But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4758
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 September 2019 at 20:57
G-man: I can't think of a single reason a dehydrator wouldn't work for this.  The volume of the Excaliber makes especial sense.

My AH also has an incredible volume, since I've acquired numerous trays through the years. Right now I have 12.

One caveat: I don't know what the raw "dough" looks and feels like, so the open question is whether it will work on the screened trays?  If not, I have several solid inserts (usually used for making fruit leathers and the like), which I'm sure would do the job.

But, so long as I have Susan as a friend.......

Selfish and evil of me, I know.  But what can I say. Beer
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
gracoman View Drop Down
Chef
Chef


Joined: 09 August 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 817
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2019 at 09:07
I thought the same about the dough but I also have the non stick liners which I use for things like this.  FWIW, parchment paper works in a pinch.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4758
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 October 2019 at 00:16
That'll work!
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.