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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 15 November 2015 at 11:48
The American Thanksgiving holiday is coming up in less than two weeks.

I'm curious how everyone celebrates. Do you do a "traditional" feast, with turkey, dressing, cranberries and the like? Or do you go a different route; maybe indulging in ethnic specialties of a different kind? Or doing something totally out of the box?

I'll be celebrating with friends, who do a traditional Thanksgiving meal. So will just bring a pass-around dish. Haven't quite made up my mind, but I'm leaning towards a cranberry conserve, just to keep within the spirit of things.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2015 at 12:54
Being from S. Texas, traditional is tamales, baked sweet potatoes and pecan pie, perhaps some empanadas de pina for a late in the day snack.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2015 at 17:40
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

The American Thanksgiving holiday is coming up in less than two weeks.

I'm curious how everyone celebrates. Do you do a "traditional" feast, with turkey, dressing, cranberries and the like? Or do you go a different route; maybe indulging in ethnic specialties of a different kind? Or doing something totally out of the box?

I'll be celebrating with friends, who do a traditional Thanksgiving meal. So will just bring a pass-around dish. Haven't quite made up my mind, but I'm leaning towards a cranberry conserve, just to keep within the spirit of things.

    We'll have a traditional turkey dinner at my parents house.  With Thanksgiving coming up I already made a turkey dinner at home, and at work.  Both times in the sous vide with herbs and spices in the cook.  It turned out delicious both times...it's a pretty impressive way to cook.

   I love cranberries, cooked whole or even the jelly stuff we had when I was a kid.  Nowadays I use whole cranberries...I had no idea it was a conserve though...I had to look that up Shocked
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2015 at 20:17
You got me, Dan. I'd been taught that a fruit conserve was defined as having three or more ingredients, one of which was nuts.

Turns out, virtually all the dictionaries define it merely as preserving fruit with sugar. To me, that would be a fruit preserve.

Go figure.

At any rate, here's the recipe I use:

Cranberry Conserve

In a large heavy saucepan combine one pound raw cranberries (about 4 cups) and 1 1/2 cups water. Bring the liquid to a boil over moderately high heat and simmer five to eight minutes, or until the berries have popped and are tender. Stir in three cups sugar, one cup crushed pinapple, 1/2 cup sultans (i.e., golden raisins), and a seedless orange, pitch removed and chopped fine, and simmer the mixture, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped pecans, pour the conserve into canning jars, and seal the jars with the lids.

I usually double the recipe and put the conserve up, using some for presents and the balance over the course of the year. Process in a boiling water bath 15 minutes. Makes about 7 pints.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 November 2015 at 06:41
    Sounds really good. Brook.  I may end up making that...minus the nuts.  My oldest daughter has a tree nut allergy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 November 2015 at 11:20
Thanksgiving will be with my wife's family as usual. This year is traditional with turkey and dressing, sometimes ham, mashed potatoes and gravy, etc. Some years have been varied. One year was Mexican, featuring Uncle Terry's posole and Aunt Sandra's tacos. Another year was a shrimp boil.

A recipe from my Grandma Weber (Martha Paulina Wilhelmina Knuth Weber) that I make every year both Thanksgiving and Christmas no matter where we go because my SIL Sarah, my kid and I all love it. To hell with anyone who doesn't!

2-3 C. cranberries (1 12oz. bag)
2 C. Tokay grapes, halved and seeded*
1 C. sugar
1 C. nutmeats**
1/2 pt. heavy cream, whipped, sweetened and flavored (vanilla)***

*Tokay grapes are never available around here anymore. I just use red table grapes.
**My family has always used pecan halves. Missouri hardy pecans are ideal.
***Mom used to substitute CoolWhip but to me it's just not the same.

Grind cranberries with medium blade. Mix well with sugar. Refrigerate for 4-5 hours or overnight. Place in a colander to drain. When well drained, combine with grapes and nuts. Fold in whipped cream just before serving.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 November 2015 at 11:23
Hey Brook, How is a conserve used? Not in my realm of familiarity.
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Tom

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 November 2015 at 12:09
Pretty much like any fruit preserve, Tom. Think of this one as a semi-savory jam.

In this case it's served the same as cranberry sauce, as an accompaniment to Thanksgiving turkey.

I've also used it with luncheon meats, on sandwiches. And with any fowl---chicken, duck, game hens, even quail. It's a bit acidic for lamb, imo, but others might enjoy it.

You can even mix it into a muffin batter, in lieu of blueberries. Or combine it with dressing ingredients to make stuffin-muffins.

All in all, pretty versatile stuff.

BTW, in your recipe above, you are mixing a conserve with whipped cream
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 November 2015 at 23:00
Originally posted by Tom Kurth Tom Kurth wrote:

Grind cranberries with medium blade. Mix well with sugar. Refrigerate for 4-5 hours or overnight. Place in a colander to drain. When well drained, combine with grapes and nuts. Fold in whipped cream just before serving.

I can't get fresh cranberries here - do you think that might be nice made with re-hydrated craisins? (dried cranberries)
I could use cranberry juice to do it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 November 2015 at 03:54
Would probably work, Ann. But watch the sugar content. Craisins are more than just dried cranberries; they're sweetened--rather heavily-- as well.
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2016 at 19:33
Tradition is good, in my opinion - and while I usually go for something "different" most of the year, I believe that days such as Thanksgiving belong to the traditions.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 January 2016 at 16:08
Hi Anne sorry I missed your question. Don't know about dried fruit but I think frozen cranberries could be used if you can get them that way. While you want sweetened whipped cream and the berries are sweetened be careful not to get too much sugar. You don't want to overwhelm the tartness of the berries.
Best,
Tom

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