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The Beer Recipe Idea/Development Thread

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 29 March 2017 at 11:44
I figured it might be neat to have a thread dedicated to brainstorming and group idea-sharing when it comes to developing recipes for brewing. We could start a bunch of individual threads, of course, but I am not sure if our community is big enough for such a thing - so, I thought a dedicated thread might be a good way to start.

I'll open up with one that's currently on my mind. I'm just playing around with ideas here, but I am open to suggestions and any input would be appreciated....

I recently bought a pound of Weyermann Abbey Malt and am considering using it as part of some sort of bastardized weizen-type beer. Here's the link to the Malt:

https://www.homebrewsupply.com/weyermann-abbey.html

My current Idea is this:


Quote Un-Named Wheat/Abbey Weizen

1 gallon
All-Grain

OG - 1.051
FG - 1.013
ABV - 5.01%
IBU - 14.73
SRM - 7.70


Fermentables

1.0 lb (50%) German Pale Wheat Malt
0.5 lb (25%) German Abbey Malt
0.5 lb (25%) Pilsner Malt (a "bottom-of-the-bag" mix of German, Belgian and Bohemian)


Mash at 152 Degrees for 60 Minutes


60-Minute Boil

Hops

3.0g Tettnanger (estimated 4.5% AA) @ 60 Minutes
2.75g Tettnanger (estimated 4.5% AA) @ 15 Minutes
2.75g Tettnanger (estimated 4.5% AA) @ 1 Minute


Yeast

Danstar Munich Yeast (Alternates: DanStar Classic Munich or WLP 300)


I am definitely going for German in general character, but the addition of the Abbey malt of course opens the possibility for a twist. I'm not married to the idea of the Tettnanger hops, but something Noble seems...right. Mandarina Bavaria might be interesting; but then again, it might be too much

I considered adding some orange zest at or near the end of the boil, but that has been done to death; still, if it will make a nice beer, then the option is definitely on the table. Lemon zest? Possibly, but I am not sure how it would play with the rest of the flavor profile. Some other possibilities included raspberries, cherries, chocolate nibs or the revolutionary concept of adding...nothing at all!

Anyway, my level of experience in recipe development is such that I would be grateful for any advice. I've never worked with Abbey malt, but I like the description.

Thanks in advance -

Ron
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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 March 2017 at 14:28
I got nothing to add, but I'll be following along for sure.
Mike
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 March 2017 at 15:33
Hi, Mike -

The more I think about it, the more it is simply looking nice the way it is. The Tettnanger hops would be a great tribute to the region, and with their floral/spicy characteristics, not much else would be needed. I'm still thinking that the zest of a lemon might be a nice touch, but I'm worried that it might run the risk of muddling up a good thing.

I'll think about it...maybe I'll just slap the name "Klosterkirche Weizenbier" on it, and run with it as-is.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 March 2017 at 15:46
Adding this to the discussion: a member of another forum suggested the Saphir hop, which is also a German variety. I had never heard of the Saphir, but after reading the description, I agree that it is pretty interesting:

http://beerlegends.com/sapphire-hops

I'll have to think about that one, for sure.

If I did use the Saphir hop, the lemon zest might compliment it very well - or would it be too much?

I'm definitely still on the fence, but I love the brainstorming....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 March 2017 at 09:05
The more I've been thinking about this, the more I've been thinking - rightly or wrongly - of the Black Forest region of Germany.

I think I'll go with a mix of red fruits that would be found there - maybe raspberries, cherries and strawberries - and add that to the beer. I would like to do red currants as well, but they are all but impossible to find where I live, except possibly in dried or jelly form.

I would want this to compliment the beer, not to overwhelm it and become the dominant character. I'm thinking 1.5 or 2 cups of the medley to the gallon of beer would be pretty nice - no more than 3. Based on my experience, the sugars in the fruits would ferment out, leaving a nice, gentle tartness and - over time - a fruit presence that would assert itself after about a month.

My normal practice has been to add the fruits right in the last minute of the boil, or at knock-out; sometimes I mash the fruit up a bit and warm it on the stove, sometimes not. Another option is to dump them into the fermenter before pitching the yeast; or, I could wait until after a week or so in primary. I'll have to figure that out.

And, I think "KlosterKirche" might be a good name for it, for sure, or possibly "SchwarzWälder."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2017 at 11:23
After thinking on it and discussing it a bit, I've decided to abandon the fruit in the beer for the recipe that I've been working on above. The main reason for this is because I think that the fruit flavours might be out of balance with the maltiness f the beer, making it a bit too much on the sweet side. Unless some significant insight changes this decision, I will stick with what was essentially the original plan, and the "KlosterKirche" moniker.

But, the "SchwarzWälder" has still be rolling around in my mind a bit, and I have a plan that might really be something interesting...maybe. What I am thinking is to incorporate the chocolate and forest berry ideas into a Brown Ale, with a coinciding bump in IBUs to provide some balance. It might be something of an English/German hybrid, but oh well - it could be a very good one.

More soon -

Ron

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2017 at 12:01
Here is my idea for the second, "SchwarzWälder"-themed beer, so far....

Quote SchwarzWälder Braun

1 gallon
All-Grain

OG - 1.051
FG - 1.012
ABV - 5.1%
IBU - 23.75
SRM - 20.63


Fermentables

26 oz. American Pale Ale Malt (78.3%)
2.9 oz. British Brown Malt (8.7%)
2.9 oz. Caramel/Crystal 40L Malt (8.7%)
1.42 oz Chocolate Rye Malt (4.3%)

Mash at 152 Degrees for 60 Minutes


60-Minute Boil

Hops

0.1 oz. Bramling Cross (estimated 6.5% AA) @ 60 minutes
0.1 oz. Bramling Cross (estimated 6.5% AA) @ 30 minutes
0.1 oz. Bramling Cross (estimated 6.5% AA) @ Knock-out


Yeast

1/2 Package of Safale S-04


Other Ingredients

1.0 oz. Cocoa powder @ Knock-out (mixed with just enough water to make a slurry)
8.0 oz Raspberries in Secondary (frozen then mashed; after 7 days for 7 days)


Feedback from the brewers here would be welcome.

Thanks in advance -

Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2017 at 15:56
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

After thinking on it and discussing it a bit, I've decided to abandon the fruit in the beer that I've been working on above. The main reason for this is because I think that the fruit flavours might be out of balance with the maltiness f the beer, making it a bit too much on the sweet side.


I'm not sure how 'black forest' it would be, but what if you were to use tart/sour cherries. 'Sauerkirsche' in German. You could possibly reduce/replace the bittering hops with sour cherries added in fermentation? Just an idea.
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2017 at 09:01
Originally posted by pitrow pitrow wrote:

Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

After thinking on it and discussing it a bit, I've decided to abandon the fruit in the beer that I've been working on above. The main reason for this is because I think that the fruit flavours might be out of balance with the maltiness f the beer, making it a bit too much on the sweet side.


I'm not sure how 'black forest' it would be, but what if you were to use tart/sour cherries. 'Sauerkirsche' in German. You could possibly reduce/replace the bittering hops with sour cherries added in fermentation? Just an idea.


   I like that idea Pitrow!

  From a little digging, cherries or tart cherries seem to line up with drinks in the Black Forest region.  If you add the cherries, or fruit, as late editions...treating it with a portion of a campden tablet (then a 24hour wait) may help any worries of introducing wild yeast...or pasteurizing the fruit at 160f for 30minutes should do it too.  I'm thinking sous vide would come in handy here!

   ...or just add it...if the wild yeast does take off you've just got some nice funk!  
Enjoy The Food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 April 2017 at 12:03
After splitting my "recipe development" ideas into two different beers, a third one came to mind as well, and it goes right along with the comments from Mike and Dan.

Recently, I tried two different "Lambic" style Belgian beers: a Cherry "Kriek" and a Raspberry "Framboise." Both are essentially the same - the only difference is the fruit used - and both were knock-your-socks-off incredible, in ways that I would not have imagined possible for a beer. I had a slight preference for the Framboise, but both were outstanding.

I actually have a recipe for the "Kriek," and it would be easily adaptable to the raspberries, or even blackberries (hint to Mike). If either of you would like the recipe in order to take a look, let me know.

For myself, I would eventually brew both (and possibly chockecherry and/or buffaloberry, as well)...but the Framboise will definitely be my first attempt when I do this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2017 at 07:09
    A lambic is on my list too.  I'd love to take a look at the recipe, thanks.  I think I'm switching gears on my next beers, basically because I'm out.  A nice light pale ale, with whole (self roasted) coffee beans, a stout to be determined and an American Whet IPA. 

    I think I need to change my fermentation chamber to a deep freeze, so I can ferment multiple beers at the same time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2017 at 11:30
G'morning, gents -

I went ahead and sent that recipe to both of you. Look it over and let me know if there are any questions; it is a bit of a process compared to "regular" brewing, but I am guessing it is quite rewarding.

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