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The Different Wording Of The Same Thing!

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English Rose View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote English Rose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The Different Wording Of The Same Thing!
    Posted: 28 April 2018 at 08:52

Hi everyone, Found this online and thought I would copy it for the Forum so if there is any puzzlement or query over the different meanings to food names for the same foodstuffs and associated items, we can at least refer to this list. I know it will certainly help me.  Hope it does the same for you.




THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHAT AMERICANS AND THE ENGLISH CALL IT


ENGLISH                       AMERICAN ENGLISH NOTES.


A

Aubergine                        Eggplant


B


Bacon                               Bacon In the UK Bacon is usually from

                                                                              The back of the Pig, whereas in

                                                                              The US it is from the belly, which

                                                                               In the UK we call this Streaky.


Bain Marie                       Double Boiler The term Banger originated

Banger  or Sausage       Sausage               when the skin casing in our

                                                                                Sausages had a tendency to

                                                                                Burst and make a loud bang!

Biscuit                             Cookie

Boiled Sweet                  Hard Candy

Broad Bean                    Fava


C


Candy Floss                  Cotton Candy

Caster Sugar                 Superfine Sugar

Chicory                          Endive

Chipolata                       Cocktail Sausage

Chips                             French Fries

Crisps                            Chips

Cider                              Hard Cider

Cling Film                      Saran Wrap

Conserves                     Preserves

Coriander                      Cilantro

Cornflour                       Cornstarch

Cos Lettuce                   Romaine Lettuce

Courgette                      Zucchini or Summer Squash

Cream (Double)            Heavy Cream

Cream (Single)             Half and Half

Cutlery                          Flatware or Silverware

Cutlet or Chop             Chop


D

Demerara Sugar           Light Brown Cane Sugar

Digestive Biscuit          Graham Cracker

Donar Kebab                 Gyro


F

Fairy Cake                     Cupcake

Fillet Steak                     Fillet Mignon or Tenderloin

Fish Fingers                  Fish Sticks

French Beans                String Beans

Frying Pan                     Skillet


G

Gammon                        Ham

Glace Fruits                  Candied Fruits

Greaseproof paper      Wax paper

Green/Red Peppers     Bell Peppers

Grill                               Broiler


H          

Hull                                       Shuck

Hundreds & Thousands     Sprinkles


I

Ice Lolly                               Popsicle

Icing                                     Frosting

Icing Sugar                          Confectioner’s Sugar


J

Jam                                      Jelly

Jelly                                     Jello


K

Kipper                                  Smoked Herring


L

Liquidizer                             Blender


M

Main Course                        Entree

Mangetout                           Snow Peas

Mince                                   Ground

Muesli                                  Granola


P

Pastry Case                         Pie Case

Paw Paw                              Papaya

Pie                                        Pot Pie

Plain Flour                           All Purpose Flour

Plonk                                   Cheap Wine

Porridge                              Oatmeal, cooked

Prawns                                Small Shrimps

Profiterole                           Cream Puff

Pudding                               Dessert


R

Rocket                                  Arugula

Rump Steak                         Sirloin


S

Scone                                   Biscuit

Semolina                              Cream of Wheat

Sirloin Steak                        Porterhouse Steak

Sorbet                                  Sherbert

Spirit                                     Liquor

Spring Onions                     Green Onions

Stella or Wife Beater           Stella Artois

Stone                                    Pit     As in Peaches

Sultanas                              Golden Raisins

Swede                                  Rutabaga

Sweet                                   Dessert

Sweetcorn                           Corn

Sweets                                 Candy

Swiss Roll                           Jelly Roll


T

Tart                                       Pie

Tin Foil                                Aluminium Foil

Tinned                                 Canned

Toffee                                  Taffy

Treacle                                 Molasses


W

Whisky                                Scotch (Whiskey) spelled with an E comes

                                                                          From Ireland or the USA

Wholemeal Flour               Whole-wheat flour


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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 April 2018 at 16:55
Huh! I say tinfoil and frying pan, and I've lived in Upstate NY (USA) my whole life.
What do you call the brown powdered spice that American stores call coriander? (I think one's the leaf and one's the ground seeds of the same plant, but I like the spice, while the herb tastes like soap to me,)

Thanks for the fascinating list!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 April 2018 at 19:41
Rose & Melissa; in the U.S., the words frying pan and skillet are used interchangeably---although we tend to say skillet more in the South.

This wasn't always the case. In colonial and Federalist times, they were different pans, the primary difference being that one had legs and the other was flat bottomed.

Rose, don't they, in parts of Great Britain, use "pudding" to refer to any dessert? That's an impression I've gained.

BTW, I'm hoping that Ron or Dave will turn this into a sticky. Although there might be some questionable ones on the list, overall it's a valuable contribution to the forums.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 April 2018 at 02:49
[QUOTE

BTW, I'm hoping that Ron or Dave will turn this into a sticky. Although there might be some questionable ones on the list, overall it's a valuable contribution to the forums. [/QUOTE]

Done

Might want to add capsicum to the list as well
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 April 2018 at 03:41

Merits ..  

I live in Europe almost 30 years so I am aware of the nuances on both sides of the blue pond.  

Having had a French Mom and Italian Dad, I am aware of all these nuances ..  

It is quite useful for those unaware,  and  Thank you Hoser for pinning it ..   


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www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 April 2018 at 05:40
Although the distinctions are blurring (thankfully), measurements often mean different things as well. For instance, a "gil," is 1/4 cup, on one side of the Pond, but 1/5 cup on the other. IIRC, a barrel is different, too.

Traditionally, they used level tablespoons in Britain, but rounded ones on this side of the Atlantic.

All of which could have a serious impact, depending on the recipe.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote English Rose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 April 2018 at 02:49
Originally posted by Melissa Mead Melissa Mead wrote:

Huh! I say tinfoil and frying pan, and I've lived in Upstate NY (USA) my whole life.
What do you call the brown powdered spice that American stores call coriander? (I think one's the leaf and one's the ground seeds of the same plant, but I like the spice, while the herb tastes like soap to me,)

Thanks for the fascinating list!


Hi Melissa,


Found this online, courtesy of Mr Gordon N. Hamilton :-


In the United Kingdom                         In the USA                          In India

Here we refer to                             In the US, the leaves In India, the herb is extremely

The leaves and the stalks              and stalks of the plant popular in cooking. It is

Of the plant as “Coriander”            are referred to as referred to as something

While the seeds are                       “Ciantro” while the different sounding altogether -

Called “Coriander Seeds”              seeds are referred to “dhania” “just to further

Basically, the word                         as “Coriander” confuse the issue!”

“Ciantro” does not exist                

In the UK.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 April 2018 at 15:32
In fact, "coriander" is used for both the herb and the seeds in most of the world that uses it. Cilantro seems to be endemic to the U.S. and Latin America.

In the Republic of Georgia, in addition to the fresh herb, dried coriander is used for culinary purposes. I don't know of any other cuisine that does so.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 May 2018 at 12:59
A very good resource that helps explain many things - thank you!
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