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The HOT Pepper & You

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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 02:17
Hoser,
 
I am in agreement ... It is cultural too ... One must take it slow if it a 1st time ... As children, we become quite used to piquant or whatever flavor profiles are presented ...
 
I am a Tabasco fan too ... And I love Peruvian Ahí  too ... and Calabrian Chili Peppers ... I used to order them from www.almagourmet.com 
 
They were pretty pricey in the USA ... however, they are an earthy essence with a mild heat and are dried variety ... Lovely on pasta with garlic and some minced fresh basil or parsley ... with a high quality Italian Evoo ...
 
Have nice wkend.
Margi.
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africanmeat View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 11:56
Originally posted by MarkR MarkR wrote:

I love steamed Thai Spring Rolls! With peanut sauce!
Yummm, think I'll go make some!

i got a great peanut sauce that i use on my chicken satay, try it with your spring  rolls 
i do it is yummy.
you will find it here 
http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/thai-chicken-satay-with-peanut-sauce_topic2137.html

Ahron
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MarkR View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MarkR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 13:56
Originally posted by africanmeat africanmeat wrote:


Originally posted by MarkR MarkR wrote:

I love steamed Thai Spring Rolls! With peanut sauce!
Yummm, think I'll go make some!

i got a great peanut sauce that i use on my chicken satay, try it with your spring  rolls i do it is yummy.
you will find it here http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/thai-chicken-satay-with-peanut-sauce_topic2137.html


That is really close to my recipe, I use Panang Red Curry paste.
Mark R
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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 14:31
Originally posted by africanmeat africanmeat wrote:

Originally posted by MarkR MarkR wrote:

I love steamed Thai Spring Rolls! With peanut sauce!
Yummm, think I'll go make some!

i got a great peanut sauce that i use on my chicken satay, try it with your spring  rolls 
i do it is yummy.
you will find it here 
http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/thai-chicken-satay-with-peanut-sauce_topic2137.html



   Delicious sounding recipe!
Enjoy The Food!
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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 14:36
   Wow, lots of heated discussion in this thread LOL

   I, like others, like to use hot peppers for the flavoring...heat comes secondary.  The days of me biting into a hot pepper are long gone.
 
   Margi, you mentioned wasabi.  I just love fresh wasabi!!!  The way it delivers the heat is so much different than many peppers, or fake wasabi.  To me, fresh wasabi packs an incredible punch of heat in your mouth from the first taste...then it quickly goes vanishes and lets the flavors flow through.  It's really a unique way to present flavors behind the heat, instead of in front of it. 

Enjoy The Food!
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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 14:42

Dan,

 
Wasabi, indigenious to Japan, is a freshly cultivated  Japanese radish root ...
 
Now the Light Green Powder or dried Wasabi is not fake; it is just dried Wasabi --- at least here it is ... It states so on the packaging; 100% Dried Wasabi Radish Root in Spanish, English and French ...
 
Yes, I love Wasabi ... It provides a delightful touch to Sashimi and Sushi ... or Maki ...
 
Kindest regards;
Have lovely wkend.
Margi.
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Rod Franklin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 19:44
According to East Indian Ayurvedic tradition there are 6 tastes. Sweet, sour, salty, pungent, bitter, and astringent. Those who hold to those traditions try to incorporate all of them in every dish, believing to do so provides a natural balance, and thereby health.

It's easy to find foods from all corners of the globe that one could classify as predominately of one or the other of the first four mentioned. The last two are more difficult but I'm sure examples are not impossible to locate.

The point of the preceding is to stress that for vast numbers of people inhabiting this planet, foods whose main feature is pungency, or 'chile pepper hot' is what they like.

Me? I can tolerate hot food. In fact, I more than tolerate it, I can enjoy it. I think eating super hot chiles as some sort of macho display is just dumb. It's like turning a force of nature into a bad-boy toy. It's disrespectful. I read a lot. Books and what I consider reliable sources on the internet. Does that make me a scholar? Or a know-it-all? I don't think so. What I am is someone who does his homework. The following is the result of some research and nothing more. Noting that couldn't be found or verified by anyone reading this if they wanted to.

That said, a little history. Chiles come from the New World. Southern Brazil/Bolivia to be precise. Archaeological evidence of chile eating goes back maybe 10,000 years and undisputed evidence of their cultivation goes back about 5,500 years. Much recorded testimony from Incan scholars and the Spanish in South America attest to the use of chiles in most everything eaten by the indigenous cultures of the time. Their cultures revered chile as devine and used it in many ways beyond just in food.

It was the Spanish who brought chile to the rest of the world more than 500 years ago. Since, many millions of people and many cultures far and wide have embraced the pod and have made it an integral, if not prominent part of their cuisine, with commonly consumed dishes that are just too hot for those not accustomed being the norm.

So, if you fancy yourself to be a world gastronome and want to say you know from which you speak, then you need to get used to heat. There truly is only one way and that is to burn yourself with it a few times. Yeah, that means flames going in and flames going out. I promise, you won't die.

That isn't some idle dare to make you do something stupid, there's some science going on in that burning process. You knew there was going to be some science.

There are six capsaicinoids (cap-SAY-iss-sin-oyds) in chile peppers. Each kind of chile, for which there are many, have their own mix of these six chemicals, producing the signature type of burn found in different families of chiles. All of these capsaisinoids react with pain receptors in your body, these receptors in turn produce a chemical signal which is sent to the brain telling it something is on fire! Intense application of the capsaisinoids confuses the pain receptors and drains them of the chemical messenger. Capsaicin also inhibits the pain receptors from making more of the chemical messenger, effectively making one able to consume more capsaisin with less burning effect. The chemical messenger also triggers the brain to release endorphins which are morphine like pain killers. Burn yourself good a few times and you are good to go for quite a while, and another part of the food world opens to you.

All-in-all, for many millions of people throughout the world, eating hot food is that uniquely human experience that can only be described as benignly masochistic.

If there were people participating in this forum that were born and raised in a chile centric food environment, and they started posting their everyday recipes, and those recipes as written would make you cry like a..., I don't think they would like being singled out as some sort of...

YOU fill in the blanks. 
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MarkR View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MarkR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 22:09
Baby.
And add Umammi. (some say)
Mark R
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 March 2013 at 06:13
Hmmmmmmmm? Mushrooms, soy sauce, fish sauce, salt, anchovy paste----and chilis? I don't see it.
Or, as they say on Sesame Street, one of these things is not like the others.
 
Chilis bring a special flavor profile to food, its true. But Umammi? Uh, uh. Chilis do not make other foods taste more like themselves.
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