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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 February 2019 at 11:05
I don't see any reason why it wouldn't work on pork, Ron. The flavors are all compatible.

Dried orange peel is available in Asian markets, and, I suppose, on-line? I make my own, and try to keep about a year's supply on hand. It's a little time consuming, because you want to remove as much of the white pith as possible before throwing the pieces in the dehydrator.  But, other than that, it's a straight-forward drying process.

The small amount needed in this recipe probably wouldn't take a whole orange. So preparing it shouldn't be a big deal. 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 February 2019 at 11:28
I have some dried Valencia orange peel that should work pretty well for this; otherwise, it would be just as easy to get some going.

I'm pretty eager to try the rub - will look for an opportunity to do so!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2019 at 08:56
The dried Valencia should be perfect Ron.

Nice thing about it: if it's been dried and stored properly, it lasts about 2 days longer than forever.  

I keep it on hand primarily because I periodically make things like Chinese Orange Chicken.  Earlier this week I made it again, but, as an experiment, used fresh zest instead of dried peel.  I could detect no difference in the flavor. 

Although the rub is said to store well, I'm always leery about making large batches of any mix using ground spices.  Once ground, spice potency starts to decline.  At best, ground spices of any kind should be replaced annually. When mixing up spice blends, I make as much as I think I'll use up in no more than six months. 

This is not the same as keeping whole spices.  They do not go bad.  That's what made the spice trade possible in the first place.  Think about it: Some of those caravans were on the road for more than two years just getting to the trade centers.  Add in the distribution time, and it could be three or more years before they reached the consumer.  But it made no difference.  

Once the whole spices are broken or ground their essential oils start to evaporate.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2019 at 10:33
Sounds about right, Brook - I tend to keep my spices longer than I should, and am going to have to schedule a clean-out of the spice cabinet, soon.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2019 at 12:11
Quote This is not the same as keeping whole spices.  They do not go bad.  That's what made the spice trade possible in the first place.  Think about it: Some of those caravans were on the road for more than two years just getting to the trade centers.  Add in the distribution time, and it could be three or more years before they reached the consumer.  But it made no difference.

Once the whole spices are broken or ground their essential oils start to evaporate.


Which is why I always purchase my spice in the whole form if possible. Black pepper, cloves, allspice, cinnamon and coriander are just a few ....grind them as you need them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2019 at 15:51


The anguilas ( tiny shoe string baby eels ) :  These are very common in the Basque Country served with dried red horn shaped chili peppers and many frozen fish companies package them as they are commonly served with eggs baked in cazuelas or sautéed with scrambled eggs, but NOT all brands are authentic eel ..  However, all are labelled !!  

Best to buy from a Fish Monger that you know and trust ..  

If wild, you can purchase live, and / or packaged frozen  shall say so .. 

If false, shall tell you the ingredients.  

These are okay but surely not like other varieties of wild  eel and definitely not the best quality. 

The best are served as Sashimi or Nigriri at Japanese restaurants or at Michelin Star Restaurants or top hotel venues.  




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 February 2019 at 07:58

When it comes to vegetables and side dishes, Portuguese cooks really shine. Veggies play an important role, and there is no lack of diversity. From roots to cole crops to grains and, especially, legumes, Portuguese cooks put a special slant to all their dishes.

Potatoes are an especial love. Whether roasted, boiled, mashed, fried, or baked, there’s always room for the lowly spud on Portuguese tables. Indeed, it’s likely the Portuguese are second only to the Irish in their love of potatoes.  Most often they are merely boiled, and served with a drizzle of flavorful sauce.

Legumes, both fresh and dried, run potatoes a close second, with fava beans most prevalent. But the Portuguese diet expands further than that, with peas, common beans, like kidneys, and even black-eyed peas playing a role.

Leafy greens are commonly found. Often merely sautéed, there are numerous dishes that put a uniquely Portuguese twist on them. Most cultures, for instance, have a form of stuffed cabbage rolls. Rather than the more common ground beef filling, the Portuguese take that idea and make kale rolls filled with pulled pork.

Wheat, as should be obvious in a bread-centric society, is an important grain. But rice is equally important. Rice, very often, is combined with other veggies and ingredients that produce dishes which aren’t quite pilafs, but which certainly go far beyond plain boiled rice. While enjoyed nationally, corn is more of a regional favorite, particularly in the northern reaches, and out on the islands.   

Here, in no particular order, are some of the vegetables and side-dishes we’ve enjoyed:

BATATAS ASSADAS COM MASSA DE PIMENTAO

(Roasted Potatoes with Sweet Pepper Paste)

2 garlic cloves, halved                                                            

1 tsp paprika

1 scant tbls sweet pepper paste                                              

1 bay leaf

2 tbls finely chopped parsley                                                 

¼ tsp black pepper

2 tbls white wine  

2tbls olive oil

6 med-large potatoes, peeled

Preheat oven to 375F.

Using a mortar and pestle, mash the garlic with paprika, making a paste. Incorporate the pepper paste, crumbled bay leaf, parsley, black pepper and wine. Drizzle in the olive oil and mix to make a spreadable paste.

Pat the potatoes dry and cut them into quarters. Put the potatoes into a large bowl and add the seasoning paste. Turn to coat them in the paste. Transfer to a roasting or baking dish and cover with foil. Roast for 30 minutes. Remove the foil, turn the potatoes, and continue to roast them for 30 minutes more, uncovered, until tender. Season with salt if needed.

Taking this a step further, Portuguese cooks, particularly in the Alentejo region, combine the sweet pepper paste with a tomato-based sauce to pour over boiled potatoes for an even more flavorful dish:

TOMATADO

(Garlicy Tomato Sauce

¼ cup olive oil

10 garlic cloves, finely chopped

6 cups peeled, seeded, finely chopped ripe tomatoes

2 tsp sweet pepper paste

1 tsp chili pepper paste

½ tsp salt or to taste

3 tbls cider vinegar

Heat the oil in a heavy-bottomed pan. Toss in the garlic.

When the garlic becomes aromatic, but not colored, stir in the tomatoes, and pepper pastes and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until the sauce is reduced to the point where you can draw a spoon across the bottom of the pan and the line nearly remains, about 30-35 minutes.

Season with salt and mix in the vinegar. Serve over boiled potatoes. 

As noted, the Portuguese aren’t content to just serve rice as a side dish. Instead, they spark it up with various additions.  Here are two versions:

ARROZ DE TOMATE

(Tomato Rice)                                                                              

8 oz long grain rice                                                                 

1 med onion, chopped fine

2 med tomatoes, peeled, seeded, chopped

2 tbls olive oil       

Water (2 ½ x rice volume)

1 sprig parsley, chopped                                                        

Salt

Fry the onion in the oil until lightly caramelized, then add the tomatoes and parsley and cook agin for 5 minutes. Add the water, bring to boil, and add the rice and some salt. Simmer until tender (about 25 minutes) and taste for salt before serving.

You might have to add more water to keep the rice from scorching. Rice should not be too dry.

ARROZ DE COUVE

(Juicy Cabbage Rice)

½ tbls olive oil     

1 onion, chopped

1 garlic clove, chopped                                                          

1 ¼ cups risotto rice

1 small cabbage, shredded                                                    

Salt to taste

Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the onion and garlic and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes.  Add the rice and cook, stirring, 1-2 minutes, until the grains are coated with oil. Pour in 3 cups water and bring to boil. Add the cabbage and season with salt. Cook for 15-20 minutes until the rice is just tender.

I’m including this next recipe for no other reason than we fell in love with it. And, as you’ll see from the ingredients, it’s easy to run the changes on it, varying the flavor while maintaining the integrity of the dish. 

COGUMELOS MARINADOS

(Marinated Mushrooms)

14 oz mixed mushrooms (I used portobellas, oysters, and shiitakes in about equal amounts)          

2 tbls olive oil

7 oz raw ham, sausages and bacon, diced, alone or in combination

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped                                             

1-2 tbls white wine vinegar

3 tbls chopped parsley

Wipe mushrooms and cut or tear larger ones in half or quarters

Heat the olive oil in a frying pan. Add the meat cook over a low heat, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes.  Add the mushrooms, increase heat to high, and cook, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and 1 tablespoon vinegar and cook 1 minute more.

Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the parsley. Serve immediately, or, if serving cold, add the rest of the vinegar.

Next time we’ll look at more veggies and side dishes. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 February 2019 at 09:10
All look good, brook - but the Garlicky Tomato Sauce and Marinated Mushrooms really stand out, for me.

The list grows longer!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 March 2019 at 09:55

Here are a few more Portuguese vegetable and side dishes. Notice how many of them include sausage, usually chourico or linguinca.  These are used in relatively small amounts, more as flavorings than as proteins per se.

 You’d think this would make these various dishes kind of samee-same. But such is not the case. The sausages highlight the flavors, but the main ingredients still shine through.

 ERVILHAS GUISADAS COM LINGUICA

(Stewed Peas with Linguica Sausage)

1/4 cup olive oil     

2 oz salt pork in cubes (opt)

4 oz linguica in ¼ inch slices                                                 

1 small onion, chopped coarse

½ cup chopped, seeded tomatoes or 1 tbls tomato paste

1 tsp paprika         

1-2 garlic cloves, chopped coarse

1 bay leaf             

½ cup white wine

¼ cup parsley or cilantro, chopped fine                                

½-1/3 ground nutmeg or cumin                                             

3 cups frozen peas

1 tsp salt               

½ tsp pepper

4-6 eggs (1 per person)

Heat the oil in a 2 ½ quart saucepan over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add the salt pork and lightly brown, rendering the fat, about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium. Stir in the sausage and onion. When the sausage start taking on some color, about 2-3 minutes, add the tomato, paprika, garlic and bay leaf, and bring to a simmer.

Pour in the wine and stir in the parsley and nutmeg. Add the peas, season with salt and pepper, and give everything a stir. Cover tightly. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer about 15 minutes.

Make 4-6 wells in the peas, one for each egg. Crack the eggs and drop one raw egg into each well. Recover the pan and continue to simmer over medium-low heat for about 5-10 minutes, until the eggs are soft poached.

SALADA DE FEIJAO FRADE

(Black-Eyed Pea Salad)

8 oz (1 ½ cups) black-eyed peas                                            

Small onion, finely chopped

3 tbls olive oil      

1 tsp wine vinegar

2 sprigs parsley, chopped                                                      

Salt to taste

Soak peas overnight or at least half a day. Cook in twice their depth of water. Add some salt towards the end of cooking, 35-40 minutes. Do not overcook, but peas should be very tender. Drain.

Combine the onion, oil, and vinegar. Pour over peas and toss well. Sprinkle with parsley.

COUVE-DE-BRUXLAS COM CHOURICO

(Brussels Sprouts with Chourico)

2 lbs Brussels Sprouts                                                            

¼ cup olive oil

1 sm onion, sliced thin                                                           

½ red bell pepper

1 yellow bell pepper                                                              

4 oz chourico cut in matchsticks

½ cup white wine 

¼ cup cilantro, chopped

Salt & Pepper to taste

Put the sprouts in a large saucepan with water to cover. Bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer until tender, about 20 minutes.

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, bell peppers, and sausage pieces, sautéing until onions are lightly golden and the peppers and sausage take on some color, about 5 minutes. Pour in the wine and simmer 1 minute, scraping up the bottom of the pan.

Drain the sprouts and add to the pan. Give them a turn in the vegetable base and ix in 2 tablespoons of the cilantro. Taste for salt and adjust. Simmer for 1 minute. Season with pepper and serve garnished with the remaining cilantro.

CENOUEAS COM COMINHOS E COENTROS

(Carrots with Cumin and Cilantro)

1 lb carrots, peeled and cut crosswise in 1-2 inch pieces

2 tbls olive oil      

½ tsp cumin seed

1 tsp salt or to taste                                                                

5 black or white peppercorns

Pinch of dried chili pepper (option)                                      

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 tsp sweet paprika                                                                 

Juice of 1 lemon

2 tbls olive oil      

½ cup cilantro, chopped fine

2 tbls heavy cream                                                                

½ cup slivered almonds or pine nuts, toasted

Preheat oven to 400 F.  Coat the carrots with the olive oil. Transfer to a sheet pan and roast 20 minutes or to desired doneness.

While the carrots roast, make the sauce. Using a mortar and pestle, crush the cumin seeds with the salt until fairly fine. Toss in the peppercorns and chili, grinding until they are well blended. Add the garlic, grinding until a paste is formed.

Mix in the paprika followed by the lemon juice. Transfer to a larger bowl. Using a whisk, whip the dressing while gradually drizzling in the olive oil. Periodically taste the amount of lemon juice to your liking. Mix in the cilantro. Drizzle in the cream and stir.

Transfer the carrots to a serving bowl. Drizzle the sauce over, tossing the hot carrots to coat. Let stand 15 minutes and serve garnished with the toasted almonds.

COUVE FLOR COM PRESUNTO

(Cauliflower with Prosciutto)

1 large head cauliflower separated into florets

¼ cup olive oil     

1-2 garlic cloves, chopped

2-3 oz thinly sliced prosciutto, chiffonaded

½ small onion, chopped finely

Salt to taste          

White pepper to taste

1 part cider vinegar                                                                

1 part EVOO

Preheat oven to 400F. Place the cauliflower in a bowl, drizzle with the oil and toss to coat the florets. Transfer to a sheet pan and roast, turning occasionally, for 20 minutes or until fork tender.

Transfer the cauliflower to a serving bowl and add the garlic.

Meanwhile, sauté the onion and prosciutto in a little olive oil until onion is soft. Toss with the cauliflower

Season with salt and pepper to taste and drizzle with equal parts vinegar and olive oil, adjusting to taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2019 at 09:13
Brook - I see two right away that I would like to try (and could try): The carrots and the cauliflower. unfortunately, neither The Beautiful Mrs. Tas nor I have ever developed a taste for black-eyed peas, although the Brussels Sprout dish would also be good, assuming I could get a comparable sausage.

Regarding the cauliflower dish, I assume that subbing parsley in place of the cilantro would not be a faux pas where Portuguese foodways are concerned?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2019 at 09:18
No reason the salad wouldn't work with another choice, Ron. Maybe Navy beans or the like?

Yeah, sure. parsley would work just as well, I reckon.


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Regular readers know that I rarely include desserts and sweets in these explorations.  There are two reasons for this:

 

First, we don’t do a lot of desserts, here. Friend Wife is diabetic, so we have to watch her sugar intake. And I never developed a taste for them. In fact, the sweeter the dish, the less likely I am to enjoy it. 

Second: While I’m the first to admit that I’m a great cook, as a pastry chef I make a good plumber. Possibly because I do so little of it.  I do not understand how the ingredients work together (every time I hear a pastry person say something like, “it you put another egg in it it will stay moister” I get filled with envy.  Jealous of that knowledge, yes. But no desire to emulate it.

However, a friend in Europe, who is familiar with Portugal, and who has been very helpful preparing this study, specifically requested that I include some.  So this final installment is for him.

 

Caveat: Unlike all the above recipes, I have not actually prepared any of these sweet treats. So, if they require modification or adaptation, you’re on your own.

 

That said, there is no question that the Portuguese suffer from a national sweet tooth. Their world is filled with sweets, and cakes, and all sorts of pastries. Rather than finishing a meal with either a dessert or a cheese plate, they often have dessert followed by the cheese.

I’m particularly intrigued with some of the names attached to their sweets. I thought the Ottoman’s were whimsical in their naming of recipes, but they don’t hold a candle to the Portos. Angel’s Breasts, and Nun’s Bellies, and Heavenly Bacon…..the list goes on and on. 

There’s a good reason for those names. From the 13th to 16th centuries in particular, the nuns living in convents (of which there are many, in Portugal) made these sweets to sell, for fund raising, and to serve to visiting dignitaries. Apparently, back in the day, the sisters were a lot more earthy than they became in latter days. Certainly they enjoyed a better sense of humor than the ones I grew up with.

There is a sameness to many of these sweets, however. Despite the various names, they’re based on eggs, sugar (lots of sugar!) and flour, with the addition of other flavorings such as fruit, nuts, juices, and even honey---as if they weren’t sweet enough.

On the other hand, the Portuguese have a great affinity for cake. Their love of cake is at least as strong as their love of bread. And no culture I know of is as bread-centric as Portugal, in terms of variety. Georgia comes close. But many Georgian breads are merely regional variations on a theme, rather than unique products, as is the case with Portugal. But many Georgian breads are merely regional variations on a theme, rather than unique products, as is the case with Portugal.

 

A diversity of their desserts combine these two loves, in that they are pastries converted from bread. Not just bread pudding and pain perdue---versions of which most cultures have---but others as well.

 There are regional specialties that are, at first, surprising. Until you realize that Portugal’s diverse geography and climate make growing unexpected things more than possible. Did you know, for instance, that in the Azores, pineapples are a major cash crop?  It’s not just chauvinism that makes many Portos claim Azorean pineapples are better than any grown in the tropics. Although, overall, smaller than, say, those from Hawaii, they tend to be both sweeter and juicier.

So, all in all, there is plenty to choose from. Here are just a few of the possibilities:

 

BARRIGA DE FREIRA

(Nun’s Belly)

 

10 oz granulated sugar

Small piece lemon rind

2 small slices crustless white bread, crumbled

1 oz butter

5 egg yolks

1 tsp cinnamon

 

Make a simple syrup (by heating) the sugar and just enough water to melt it, adding the lemon rind. Remove the rind and add the breadcrumbs, the butter, and, finally, the lightly beaten egg yolks. Boil very gently for 2-3 minutes, stirring all the time, to thicken. Pour into a serving dish and sprinkle with the cinnamon.

 

PAPOS DE ANJO

(Angel’s Breasts)

 

12 oz granulated sugar

2 tbls thick jam, any flavor

6 eggs plus 4 egg yolks, beaten together

1 tsp cinnamon

Butter

Icing (confectioner’s) sugar

 

Make a thick syrup with the sugar and enough water to melt it.  Remove from heat and beat in the jam. Boil again, over low heat, to thicken. Cool it down a little and add the eggs and cinnamon, stirring vigorously. Butter small patty tins really well and fill them half way with the mixture.

 

Bake in a preheated 400F oven until set and golden. When cold, dust with icing sugar before serving.

 

PAPOS DE ANJO COM LARANA EM CALDA

(Angel’s Cheeks with Oranges)

 

Melted butter for brushing

5 egg yolks

1 egg

24 raspberries to serve

3 oranges

1 cup sugar

 

Wash the oranges well, then remove the rind with a citrus zester.

 

Put the orange rind and sugar in a pan and add a scant cup water. Bring to the boil, stirring, until the sugar dissolves, then boil, without stirring, for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

 

Remove the pith from the oranges and cut out the segments. Place in a heatproof bowl and add the syrup.

 

Preheat the oven to 325F. Brush six ramekins, traditionally half-spheres, measuring 3x1 ½” with the melted butter.

 

Beat the egg yoks and egg for about 10 minutes. Divide among the prepared ramekins and place on a tray with about ½-inch water and bake for about 15 minutes, until golden.

 

To serve: divide the oranges in syrup among individual plates then turn out an angels cheek on top of each serving and add a few raspberries.

 

BOLO DE CANELA COM LARANGE

(Orange Cinnamon Cake)

 

8 tbls (112 g) unsalted butter

3 cups (400g) sugar

6 large eggs, separated

2 cups (240g) all-purpose flour

4 tsp (12g) ground cinnamon

1 tsp (3g) baking powder

½ tsp (1.5g) salt

Zest of one orange

½ cup (120ml) whole milk

½ cup (120ml) orange juice

Confectioner’s sugar for dusting

 

Preheat oven to 350F (180C). Grease and lightly flour a 10-inch (25cm) tube pan.

 

In a medium bowl using an electric mixer on medium speed, cream the butter with the granulated sugar until fluffy, about 2 minutes. Incorporate the egg yolks, beating well after each addition, mixing for 1 minute.

 

In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, cinnamon, baking powder, salt and orange zest. With the mixer on medium-low speed, add the dry ingredients in increments to the batter, alternating with the milk and orange juice. Continue to mix for about 2 minutes on medium speed.

 

With clean beaters on high speed in a separate bowl, whip the egg whites until soft peaks form. Fold into the cake batter. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for about 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean.

 

Serve this with a dusting of confectioner’ sugar. A dollop of whipped cream and perhaps a few raspberries make this an elegant desert.

 

PAO DE LO

 (Portuguese Sponge Cake with Cinnamon Sauce)

 

Melted butter for brushing                                                     

1 generous cup all-purpose flour

6 eggs                  

12 egg yolks

2 cups confectioner’s sugar

 

For the sauce:       

7 tbls milk            

3 tbls confectioner’s sugar

2 egg yolks          

Pinch of ground cinnamon

 

Preheat oven to 375F. Brush a round, 8-inch cake pan with melted butter. Line with baking parchment and brush with butter again.

 

Sift the flour into a bowl and set aside. Beat the eggs and yolks with the sugar in another bowl until light and fluffy. Gradually fold in the flour.

 

Spoon the mixture into the prepared pan and bake 25 minutes. Leave to cool completely in the pan.

Meanwhile, make the cinnamon sauce. Put all the ingredients in a heatproof bowl over a pan of barely simmering water and beat well until slightly thickened. Taste and beat in more cinnamon if desired. Leave to cool.

 

To serve, remove cake from pan. Cut into slices or wedges, keeping in mind that the center will be moist. Serve on individual plates, topped with some of the cinnamon sauce.

 

NATERCIAS

(Custard Tarts)

 

24 tartlet tins or mini-muffin tins

2 ¼ cups whole milk

½ cup butter plus additional for greasing tins

2 cinnamon sticks

Peel of one lemon

2 large eggs

2 cups sugar

¾ cups all-purpose flour

 

Preheat oven to 350F.

 

Lightly grease the unlined tins with butter, then set them on sheet pans. Heat the milk in a medium pot with the butter, cinnamon sticks and lemon peel until the butter is melted and steam is rising from the milk, about 5 minutes. Do not allow milk to boil. 

 

Using the high speed of an electric mixer, beat the eggs in a bowl with the sugar until they are thick and pale yellow, about 3-4 minutes. Reduce the speed to medium and gradually add the flour in small increments while beating. Slowly, while mixing, incorporate the hot milk into the batter, about 1 minute. Discard the lemon peel and cinnamon sticks.

 

Ladle a scant ¼ cup of custard mix into each tine, filling them about three-fourths full. Place in the oven and bake until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean and they are lightly golden on top, about 30-35 minutes. Remove from the oven. They will firm up as they cool. When slightly cool, transfer to a serving dish. Cool completely. Serve cool or at room temperature. Be sure to keep refrigerated if you are not serving immediately.

 

 

But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 March 2019 at 10:29
Excellent desserts by the looks of them, Brook - and a nice finish to this exploration!

Like you, we do not eat to many desserts at home. On Fat Tuesday, we bought a very small section of Tiramisu cake, just to get into the spirit of things - we ate it, but decided the next day that it was too much!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2019 at 08:14
Well, if you gotta, you gotta.  Personally, I'd have gone with a King cake, cuz it's more traditional, not only for Mardi Gras but wherever Carnival is celebrated. But each to his own.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2019 at 10:41
Unfortunately, the tiramisu was the "closest" that they had, quotation marks placed deliberately.
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